Let me get this straight.. A few newbie questions regarding OC'ing.

mkil5

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Aug 9, 2008
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I am building a PC and it it will have a C2D E7200, Gigabyte GA-P35-S3G mobo, and 4GB Dual Channel OCZ DDR2 6400 RAM.
Here is the websites of my parts:
http://processorfinder.intel.com/Details.aspx?sSpec=SLAPC
http://www.gigabyte-usa.com/Products/Motherboard/Products_Spec.aspx?ProductID=2627
http://www.ocztechnology.com/products/memory/ocz_ddr2_pc2_6400_sli_ready_edition_4gb_dual_channel

From what I have read regarding overclocking my CPU, I am not interested in doing any OC'ing to my RAM at the moment (Atleast nothing major). I am going to be able to increase my FSB all the way from 266x9.5 up to 400x9.5 without the need for overclocking the RAM. So assuming I have a good voltage set, I can get 3.8GHz OC without messing with my RAM? Also, I have purchased an aftermarket CPU cooler if that makes a difference for the voltage to be set. The Intel page says the Voltage Range is from
0.85V – 1.3625V. However I have read to not exceed 1.4V on 45nm processors on air, which I don't anticipate to be a problem. So if I was to run at 1.3625V, is that what I would set the voltage as in the BIOS? I have read in some guides that the BIOS voltage is not correct and that a Windows program shows the correct voltage, it was that the voltages in the BIOS are either understated or overstated, can someone give me that answer?

Sorry about throwing a bunch of random thoughts into one, but this is where I think the direction I need to be headed into OC'ing. Can someone tell me if I am right/wrong on my thoughts and what direction I need to be heading in.

This is just kind of confusing to me, I have done a ton of reading, but there are so many setups and every PC has so many different variables, I was just wanting some input on my specific setup.

Any input would be appreciated.
Thanks!
 

roadrunner197069

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The bios voltage is differet from windows apps. There is a vdroop that lowers the voltage. If your board has big vdroop you will need lots more vcore volts in the bios. If you st it to 1.4 and you vdroop to 1.325 you wont get a ery big oc without going over 1.4.
 

mkil5

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Too late now, already have the E7200 on the way, oh well. Thats the way computing works I guess.
But am I correct that I can go in and change the FSB up to 400MHZ without worrying about my RAM?
 

realyeti

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only if your fsb:dram divider is 1:1, you wont have to increase the ram from dr2-800 (400:800). otherwise, you will have to do so. (check out your divider)
 

Witt78

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As a new comer to Overclocking I would not suggest trying for an extreme overclock. Or at least take your time with it.

With a 45nm chip, the voltage tolerance is a bit lower than the other chips. This "Could" create problems in regards to "V-Droop" (You set VCore to 1.2V but under load it only gets 1.14V for example)

Many good motherboards have options that allow you to decrease or eliminate V-Droop though. If yours does not, you may want to Google for the "Vdroop pencil mod". I don't know if it works but I've read about it...

As far as your ram goes. Yes, you will get your FSB to 400MHz without screwing up the operation of your ram. Your Motherboard should be on a 1:1 ratio with your ram.... Once you exceed 400MHz FSB, your FSB will then be running faster than your ram and that will cause problems.

HOWEVER, you can change the ram to FSB ratio in your bios. This will allow you to push further. On the other hand, if you don't fully understand what you are doing, you will start entering dangerous waters at that 400 MHz FSB point.

- Witt