Lian-Li Launches Windowed PC-Q10WX: A Tiny Case To Show Off Your Hardware

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I believe my last use of a reset button was last week. I'm not a madd overclocker, but I do make enough adjustments that having a reset button saves time and aggravation, and is a little gentler on components than power-cycling. It is also helpful when recovering from some driver crashes.
 

soccerplayer88

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Why would you need a reset button? To accidentally bump and lose/corrupt data? Hold the power button for 3 seconds. Done.

OT: Looks like a great case. If I can squeeze my spare GTX 980 into it (267mm) I may have found my performance LAN case.
 

McWhiskey

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The press release and marketing is a bit misleading. The 240mm radiator HAS to be mounted on the outside of the case.
 
I don't want to power-cycle. While this may not seem like a big deal, there are too many decent cases that have reset buttons (including many Lian Li), that I am not going to consider this one for a personal build. It would probably be fine for business builds, but they don't typically need windows.
 

atheus

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The case measures 207 mm wide, 277 mm tall and has a depth of 335 mm.
So even though I know an inch is about 25mm, whenever I read an article that describes the overall size of something that isn't a case fan using millimeters I wind up reading past the dimensions without gaining any understanding of its actual size. I have to go back and convert it to inches in my head if I ever decide to really grasp its actual size. Perhaps a younger generation of Americans have been taught to think in metric, but I doubt it. FWIW, this isn't tomshardware.co.uk, so while I don't mind that fans and PSU's are measured in millimeters, when it comes to figuring out how big a case is, I'd much prefer inches (or at least put them in parentheses so swarms of idiots like myself don't all have to do the conversion separately).
 

McWhiskey

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The case measures 207 mm wide, 277 mm tall and has a depth of 335 mm.
So even though I know an inch is about 25mm, whenever I read an article that describes the overall size of something that isn't a case fan using millimeters I wind up reading past the dimensions without gaining any understanding of its actual size. I have to go back and convert it to inches in my head if I ever decide to really grasp its actual size. Perhaps a younger generation of Americans have been taught to think in metric, but I doubt it. FWIW, this isn't tomshardware.co.uk, so while I don't mind that fans and PSU's are measured in millimeters, when it comes to figuring out how big a case is, I'd much prefer inches (or at least put them in parentheses so swarms of idiots like myself don't all have to do the conversion separately).
I read halfway through your comment and said to myself, "What an idiot. You can just do a conversion." Then I read the rest of your comment... foot in mouth. I'll quietly take my place by your side.
 

atheus

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This made me laugh, thanks haha.
 

scolaner

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The case measures 207 mm wide, 277 mm tall and has a depth of 335 mm.
So even though I know an inch is about 25mm, whenever I read an article that describes the overall size of something that isn't a case fan using millimeters I wind up reading past the dimensions without gaining any understanding of its actual size. I have to go back and convert it to inches in my head if I ever decide to really grasp its actual size. Perhaps a younger generation of Americans have been taught to think in metric, but I doubt it. FWIW, this isn't tomshardware.co.uk, so while I don't mind that fans and PSU's are measured in millimeters, when it comes to figuring out how big a case is, I'd much prefer inches (or at least put them in parentheses so swarms of idiots like myself don't all have to do the conversion separately).
I read halfway through your comment and said to myself, "What an idiot. You can just do a conversion." Then I read the rest of your comment... foot in mouth. I'll quietly take my place by your side.
Ha!

I don't entirely disagree with you, and I most definitely don't want to ignite a debate about English vs. metric (please, seriously, let's not), but it's a bit tricky for us in the tech world. As you noted, many components, etc. are measure in metric. Which makes sense...which is easier to understand, that z-height is 5mm, or that it's some fraction of an inch?

But, to your point, for us 'Mericans, we have no frame of reference for 200-or-whatever mm. That might be something to consider for our style guide.

In any case (cough, pun, cough), we often roll with the measurements we're given, without bothering to convert.
 

dave_trimble

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I don't want to power-cycle. While this may not seem like a big deal, there are too many decent cases that have reset buttons (including many Lian Li), that I am not going to consider this one for a personal build. It would probably be fine for business builds, but they don't typically need windows.
With most motherboards, can't you program in the BIOS how the power button behaves? For example, a short press would be a reset while a long press powers the system off. I'm pretty sure I've seen the ability to do that in several systems I've built, and that would negate the need for a dedicated reset button.
 

Kip Lian Li

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I will admit, I did not even notice the lack of reset. That is odd. The 3 second hold does a soft reset or power off, not power cycle on most mobo, afaik, many have power and reset buttons on the rear of the mobo as well, or even on the mobo. But, if you look, many Lian Li do not have them. I think its just the way it is.

As for metric, that was mostly my decision. We used to convert for the USA PR, but now the PR is the same for all of North America. I went with the more precise unit. Any imperial units would be converted, and then you are left with fractions. The cases are built in mm, so we stick with mm. Metric is the official measurement. Hope that helps.
 

scolaner

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Thanks for the explanation, Kip. I think that about sums it up as nicely as possible: metric allows for greater specificity without fractions.
 
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