life span of system

ezerider60

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Hi my system first, p5k-e whi-fi, cpu q6600, 700w power supply, corsair ram 4gb, win xp, vid nx8600gt 256 ram, system on water cooling. System oc to 3.717 ghz, speedfan shows idle cpu 34c core 0=44c 1=43c 2=35c 3=37c. Prime95 highest core temp=0= 56c.
My question is what life span can I expect from cpu or system with these temps. system runs like a rocket.

Thanks for the reply.
 

sportsfanboy

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There are a lot of variables to consider. How many hours per day you use your computer. What voltage are you running it at. Also keep in mind what ever I say or other say, it will be only an opinion, and nothing more.

Anyway post back with your cpuz voltage at idle and load, as well as the cpu's VID number, and the hours of usage a day.
 

ezerider60

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Hi thanks for the quick reply. cpu volts 1.368 dont play many games, 10 hrs a day approx use of pc cpu loaded volts 1.360, not sure of vid number?
 
This is the 3rd or 4th thread asking this same question within the past month or so; the search feature is your friend.

Hardware will last as long as it is cooled properly, maintained, and not abused. I've got a Skt478 P4 @ 2.4GHz on an aBit IC7 mobo that is about 5 years old and it runs as reliable and as stable as the day I put it together. I also have a dual opteron workstation that has been running 24/7/365 for the past 2 years with only the occasional reboot for maintenance.

Chances are you will end up upgrading your machine long before it the hardware actually fails due to metal/silicon fatigue and wear.
 

sportsfanboy

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Chunky, you forgot to add voltage as a contributing factor to cpu degradation.
His voltage is actually really low for that overclock, but adding voltage on top of the VID value will make the cpu degrade faster than running it at stock voltage. That being said, your right, with the temperatures he's showing, and relatively low voltage (for that overclock, and max voltage should be 1.5 volts), upgrading should be the problem before it dies.

Keep in mind this is only a guess, as that processor has only been available to the public for around two years.

Edit: The VID value can be found in Realtemp/Coretemp

Are you sure your stable at 3.7ghz with that voltage? Does seem low for that overclock, lol

Make sure "round off checking" is checked in prime95.26, or the errors will not show.
 

zenmaster

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It's really hard to say how long a system will "last".
The overwhelming majority of time, the system will last longer than you deem it useful. So it will die from just being outdated and not from physical failure.

And how long a device remains useful, is very dependent on what you do.
I could use a 5-6 year old PC for what most people use their computers for today. (Not the People on this Forum, but the average web surfer.)

What are you happening to use your system for?
It does not look like gaming. Just curious.
 

ezerider60

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Hi vid =1.2750 I just wanted a fast system s
ome games, photoshop, general surfing.and I just wanted to know on average how long it would last on these settings.
By the way i did do a search it came up with nothing found.
 

sportsfanboy

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Two to five years is my guess... Like Chunky said, you will likely want to upgrade before it dies, provided you keep the temps under control, and you don't require more voltage as time moves on. A q6600 or equivalent, will probably cost you 80 to 120 dollars USD in two years, so there really isn't anything to worry about.
 

DXRick

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Hardware wise, the weakest components are the hard drive and CD/DVD drives. They are the likeliest to die before you want to upgrade for more speed. Other than that, it is games that really determine the lifetime of your system.

My P4 3.0 and X800XT system is still going strong, but I need to upgrade if I want to play the latest games.

 

sportsfanboy

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Dxrick... you can't overclock a hard drive or a dvd rom to my knowledge.

Overclocking absolutely puts more stress on the part than running it stock, especially when added voltage is concerned.

Three things kill electronics and and I'm not going to mention condensation or water.

1) Heat------> An excessive amount of heat will help kill your electronic part more quickly. This value isn't fixed as most electronic devices have different heat tolerances.

2) Voltage------> Using a voltage value higher than factory specification, will contribute to electron migration within his, your cpu and will help kill it more quickly. The higher the voltage setting, the quicker the process. A chip at stock voltage may be capable of lasting ten years. While the moderate to highly overclocked chip with lets say 10 to 20% extra voltage, will cut the life in half or less, depending on how aggressive the overclock.

3) Time------> yeah, this one you can figure out for yourself.
 
I think the weakest component is the power supply.
I have had motherboards go bad after extensive use.
Stores stop selling older components for newer ones, so upgrading is inevitable when a repair comes it's way.
You can transfer many components to newer computers. SATA hard drives, PCI-Express video cards, floppy drives, USB drives, cases, etc.
 

DXRick

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Well said sportsfanboy!

I got an Antec case with 480W PSU and added an APC UPS to keep the power flowing smoothly.

I also replaced the stock fan of the P4 Northwood (temps shot up to 70C when gaming) with a Zalman one (temps rarely go above 40C and it is much quieter), and added a fan that blows directly on the DDR 400 RAM. The Intel Active Monitor was bitching about that too.