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Question Limiting the CPU power but package temps are still high on intervals

Jul 16, 2020
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I'm rendering 3D animations for >10 hours at a time on a laptop: Asus GL704GW (i7-8750H & RTX 2070). The CPU is reaching 95°C when on Balanced power plan and 86°C when on silent - not a good practice for long hours imo. So, I created a power plan where I limit the "Maximum Processor State" to 80% or 70% (I don't mind it taking longer time to render). When on 70% the CPU cores average 70°C (in CPUID HWMonitor) but the package temp fluctuates between 70°C and 92°C (cause the processor kicks in and out of processing). I'm wondering if the peaks of 92°C in package temp might still be an overheat for the laptop for the long run, what do you guys think? (Must be a laptop as I'm travelling) Thanks!
 

Phaaze88

Illustrious
Ambassador
You have to keep in mind that laptops gaming laptops are going to run hotter than desktops by default.
It's a simple rule of physics with no way around it other than increasing the size of the package area for a larger heatsink and more fans.

Low 90C thermals aren't unusual for this.
You can try the following if interested:
1)Sometimes the manufacturer does a crap job of paste application, and that leads to worse thermals - within certain expectations.
You can try and get hands on, open the laptop up, clean up the old paste application, and apply some yourself.

2)Elevate the back end of the laptop to improve ventilation.
 
Reactions: RodroX
Jul 16, 2020
4
0
10
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You have to keep in mind that laptops gaming laptops are going to run hotter than desktops by default.
It's a simple rule of physics with no way around it other than increasing the size of the package area for a larger heatsink and more fans.

Low 90C thermals aren't unusual for this.
You can try the following if interested:
1)Sometimes the manufacturer does a crap job of paste application, and that leads to worse thermals - within certain expectations.
You can try and get hands on, open the laptop up, clean up the old paste application, and apply some yourself.

2)Elevate the back end of the laptop to improve ventilation.
thanks, I understand that higher temps are expected in Gaming Laptops. When I create 3D animations I do need the extreme power. But when I leave the computer to calculate the animation for hours I don't want the extreme heat and I can wait a bit longer if needed. That's why I reduced the CPU's Power to 70%. It mosty does the trick of reducing the heat, but my question is regarding the package temps: when the core temps are in their 70°C the Package temp still, every couple of seconds, hits the 90s °C then reduces to 70°C and again and again, wondering if these 90s°C are something that will impact the longevity of the system for the long run.
 

Phaaze88

Illustrious
Ambassador
thanks, I understand that higher temps are expected in Gaming Laptops. When I create 3D animations I do need the extreme power. But when I leave the computer to calculate the animation for hours I don't want the extreme heat and I can wait a bit longer if needed. That's why I reduced the CPU's Power to 70%. It mosty does the trick of reducing the heat, but my question is regarding the package temps: when the core temps are in their 70°C the Package temp still, every couple of seconds, hits the 90s °C then reduces to 70°C and again and again, wondering if these 90s°C are something that will impact the longevity of the system for the long run.
It's the consequence of the model's thin package + cpu and gpu being on a shared cooling system.
Gaming laptops need a bigger package or a divided cooling system, or both... but that adds to the cost, unfortunately.

... running like that for 10+ hours straight? I can't see that being good in the long run.
 
Jul 16, 2020
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I think I found what's making my CPU hot - the Intel iGPU. Whenever it kicks-in the CPU package temp raises. I can clearly see that the cores temperatures are stable and then the package temp raises in 20c when the iGPU starts processing.
I cannot shut down or disable the iGPU as the RTX 2070 is routed through it. It's a shame cause it seems that the system prefers using the iGPU rather than the RTX 2070. What I found to be solving the heating issue is going into the Power Plan / Intel Graphic settings / Intel Graphics Power Plan, and change it to use "Maximum Battery Power" (instead of the "Balanced" plan) - even when it's plugged in. This lowers the usage of the iGPU and lets the RTX 2070 work. I can clearly see that the RTX 2070 in being utilized in the CPUID HWmonitor. Any thoughts on how can I achieve it in a better way? I cannot disable the iGPU in Bios or Disable it in Device Manager. Thanks!
 
Jul 16, 2020
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It's designed to dynamically switch between the 2 graphics processors when needed. It's a power saving feature.
The igpu will use less power than the 2070 on average.
Yeah, I solved the heating by capping the CPU & GPU. Before I set it to render many hours I disable turbo on the CPU (throttlestop) & limit the GPU frequency (Afterburner). Both CPU Package & GPU are not heating up above 63c so I guess this is an OK temp for +10 hours of processing non-stop?
 

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