[SOLVED] Linksys velop 3pack vs individual nodes to WRT-1900ACS

Thomas_25

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I need a mesh wifi for my home (by mesh I mean all nodes having the same ap and password-so that I do not have to connect using a different password as in the case of range extenders).

I currently have Linksys WRT 1900ACS. So do I buy individual velop nodes and connect them to my existing router for a mesh setup or do I scrap my old router for a velop only setup?
 
What do you think mesh is something magic. It is a marketing term for repeater. The only real difference is that SOME mesh unit have a dedicated radio to talk back to the main router. They did this because for a year or so they had nothing new to sell because 802.11ax was not yet released. They had to have some scam..er reason to get people to buy a new router.

Using cable to connect remote radio sources (better called a AP) is the gold standard for increasing wifi coverage. It has been the method used by large corporations since the beginning of wifi. You will notice there are no "mesh" units being sold in the high end devices designed for corporate customers.

If you use the same or different SSID is up to you there are advantages to both. Key problem is unlike a cell phone network where the network controls where you connect to wifi the end device decides and it does not always pick correctly. Wifi was not really designed for mobile use.
 
It likely doesn't matter a so called "mesh" system is really just a repeater with a couple extra features. Many repeaters allow you to use the same ssid, strange the one you have does not. Normally it is the other problem that they require that they are the same.

In general I prefer that the names are different since the end device tend to not be read smart and will not always connect to the optimum location. Many times they stay connected to the first source and will not change until the signal get unusable.

I would avoid putting in more units that you absolutely need. The signal may be stronger but the quality will be much less. The signals interfere with each other and having mulitple radio hops increases the number of times you take the chance of data being damaged.

If you can use ethernet cables to connect the remote units it will work much better than using radio repeaters. They still have the roaming issue no matter how they are connected.
 

Thomas_25

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Oct 29, 2015
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So your suggestion is to not go for the mesh and instead have a wired connection to the remote units and just put in the same SSID and password?
Will that work the same as a mesh?
It likely doesn't matter a so called "mesh" system is really just a repeater with a couple extra features. Many repeaters allow you to use the same ssid, strange the one you have does not. Normally it is the other problem that they require that they are the same.

In general I prefer that the names are different since the end device tend to not be read smart and will not always connect to the optimum location. Many times they stay connected to the first source and will not change until the signal get unusable.

I would avoid putting in more units that you absolutely need. The signal may be stronger but the quality will be much less. The signals interfere with each other and having mulitple radio hops increases the number of times you take the chance of data being damaged.

If you can use ethernet cables to connect the remote units it will work much better than using radio repeaters. They still have the roaming issue no matter how they are connected.
So your suggestion is to have a wired connection to the remote units (normal range extenders or routers) and have them use the same SSID and password?
Does it work the same as a MESH setup?
 
What do you think mesh is something magic. It is a marketing term for repeater. The only real difference is that SOME mesh unit have a dedicated radio to talk back to the main router. They did this because for a year or so they had nothing new to sell because 802.11ax was not yet released. They had to have some scam..er reason to get people to buy a new router.

Using cable to connect remote radio sources (better called a AP) is the gold standard for increasing wifi coverage. It has been the method used by large corporations since the beginning of wifi. You will notice there are no "mesh" units being sold in the high end devices designed for corporate customers.

If you use the same or different SSID is up to you there are advantages to both. Key problem is unlike a cell phone network where the network controls where you connect to wifi the end device decides and it does not always pick correctly. Wifi was not really designed for mobile use.
 

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