Linksys wrt54g2 v1 access point

Jul 8, 2018
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Hi everyone,

First of all, I already checked the other questions about this subject, I tried the answers but they didn't work for me. I got an existing router which is too weak to cover the full house. I want to extend this network by adding the wrt54g2 v1 as an access point.
Can anyone help me out?
 
Jul 8, 2018
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Yes, I’ve tried this, but whenever I am trying to connect (either wired or wireless) I don’t have a connection to the internet.
Back in the days I used to use the routers seperately, where a cable from router 1 (LAN port 1) went into the WAN port of the second router.
This method made both networks slower, so that’s why I decided to try this, however, it didn’t go quite as easy as I’ve red.

*EDIT*
Also I don’t really understand why it should be in a normal LAN port instead of the WAN port, why is that?
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator


The WAN port wants to talk to a modem.
The LAN port(s) is basically just a switch, and then distributes the signal downstream. Either wired or WiFi.
 
Jul 8, 2018
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So my main router has this as local IP: 192.168.178.1 and its DHCP server starts with IP: 192.168.178.10 and the amount of devices which can connect are 235, what IP should I use for my WRT54g2?
Also does the SSID and the security of the WRT54g2 have to be the same as my 'main' router?
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator


Change the DHCP range.
Have it be something like 192.168.178.10 - 192.168.178.50.
Then, give the Linksys an IP address outside that range. 192.168.178.60, for example.
 
Are you really sure you want to use that old router as a AP it is going to be kinda slow since it only runs 802.11g.

To make things simpler I would use different SSID so you know what you are connecting to. You can make them the same but the end device may not choose the correct router sometimes. In some cases a weaker signal from the main router running 802.11n may be faster than a strong signal running 802.11g. The selection software in the end devices are pretty stupid, they are lucky if they connect to the strongest signal sometimes.
 


You are creating a bridge like a switch. At layer2 frames can be sent around to everything on the same layer2 broadcast. When it needs to get outside the network it is turned into packet which normally goes through a NAT to the outside. When you connect the LAN of one to another they are on the same layer2 broadcast now and should be on the same subnet/gateway for the internet to work. layer2 is designed to go fast not to be secure. frames don't go through firewalls on unmanaged switches or through the router for local traffic.

The physical ports are assigned to interfaces. WAN and LAN. In some routers they can be changed. In managed ones VLANs can be created that does this all virtually in the software and you can run multiple networks off one device.

Plugging a router into another router is nesting. it's not great practice. it just adds extra overhead to your network and it's not separating your subnets.
 

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