Linux ??

trencin

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What Linux would you guys recommend for a new Linux user. I have read many posts on linux software but not sure which exactly would be good starting point for me. Thanks for yall help
 

linux_0

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What Linux would you guys recommend for a new Linux user. I have read many posts on linux software but not sure which exactly would be good starting point for me. Thanks for yall help
http://tdlp.org
http://ubuntuforums.org/
http://www.fedoraforum.org/

You should probably try out Ubuntu x86_64 or FC5 x86_64

If you want something user friendly check out ubuntu x86_64 http://mirror.mcs.anl.gov/pub/ubuntu-iso/CDs/5.10/ubuntu-5.10-install-amd64.iso

http://www.ubuntu.com/screenshots

If you want something cutting edge go for FC5 x86_64
http://mirrors.kernel.org/fedora/core/5/x86_64/iso/FC-5-x86_64-DVD.iso

http://www.linuxforums.org/reviews/fedora_core_5_review.html

OpenSuSE is kewl http://mirrors.kernel.org/opensuse/distribution/SL-OSS-current/iso/

http://gnuman.com/content/view/61/28/

If you want something stable ( and several versions behind ) for server use check out CentOS http://mirrors.kernel.org/centos/4.3/isos/x86_64/

Be sure to check out: http://distrowatch.com/

A good x86_64 distribution can run 64bit and 32bit code and can also run other operating systems using VMWare, QEMU, DOSBox, WINE, Cedega and many others.

http://www.vmware.com/products/server/

http://qemu.org/

http://dosbox.sourceforge.net/news.php?show_news=1

http://winehq.com/

http://transgaming.org/ aka Cedega


Linux can also emulate other architectures such as Power PC, ARM, Sparc, Commodore 64 and many others as well as game consoles (Nintendo, Sega and others).

Whatever Linux cannot run natively it can run in a Virtual Machine or in an emulator.


You may also find useful info below:

http://forumz.tomshardware.com/software/Whats-favoriet-Distro-ftopict230908.html

http://forumz.tomshardware.com/software/distro-AMD64-SMP-ftopict230313.html
 

trencin

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Thanks for the help. I have decided that I will get Ubuntu. Looks really cool and seems to have more configuration than windows. Thanks again for the help
 

trencin

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Thanks for the help. I have decided that I will get Ubuntu. Looks really cool and seems to have more configuration than windows. Thanks again for the help
 

bmouring

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I have recommended ubuntu to many newcomers, it's very user friendly and has a fine support base (of both users/forums and software packages). Fine choice indeed!
 

Zoron

Splendid
You don't have to... you can always dual-boot. I do, Linux_0 does... and a lot of people do. The only difference is how much time we spend on Linux vs. Windows. I spend more time on Windows, and Linux_0 spends more time on Linux.

:)
 

linux_0

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You don't have to... you can always dual-boot. I do, Linux_0 does... and a lot of people do. The only difference is how much time we spend on Linux vs. Windows. I spend more time on Windows, and Linux_0 spends more time on Linux.

:)

Aye this is true :-D

I spend all my time under Linux except when I play stubborn windoze-only games.

If you have the disk space, you can dual, triple or quad boot no problem.

You can also run some OSes in virtual machines or emulators, unfortunately those aren't perfect yet but they have gotten very good. :-D
 

bmouring

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Do yall think that Linux will stand strong after vista comes out ???
One of the major draws of Linux is the engineering and scientific applications which, surprisingly, some applications are Linux/BSD only! . In addition, the fact is that (currently,at least) Linux and BSD are more stable, reliable, and secure which will always have a place in enterprise and server applications. We'll see what kind of improvements Vista will bring, but even if it is rock-solid, the fact is Linux and BSD can be as low-requirements as you need it to be: a fine server can be run on a 200MHz pentium with 64 Megs of memory (not high-load, but for home use it'd be plenty)

As for dual-booting, it's actually pretty easy now with many of the new distributions of Linux to maintain access to the Windows install you have. There are litterally tons of guides on how to do this procedure, and as always linux_0 and I are more than willing to help you out if you sriously want to give it a spin.

That being said, you don't even need to invest to that level, you can try linux without actually even touching Windows or your harddrive with one of the many Linux LiveCDs. In addition to giving you a low-risk taste of Linux, they make damn fine diagnostic and recovery tools. Again, many tutorials on how to use such bootable CDs as a recovery vessel.

Happy computing.
 

trencin

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Linux seems to be a really good program. Where could I get the LiveCD to look at the Linux programs or do I need to order them ? Sorry to ask too many questions but Do you guys think that Linux will support future games later on ?
 

linux_0

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Linux seems to be a really good program. Where could I get the LiveCD to look at the Linux programs or do I need to order them ? Sorry to ask too many questions but Do you guys think that Linux will support future games later on ?

Knoppix!

http://www.kernel.org/pub/dist/knoppix/KNOPPIX_V4.0.2CD-2005-09-23-EN.iso

http://www.kernel.org/pub/dist/knoppix/knoppix-dvd/KNOPPIX_V4.0.2DVD-2005-09-23-EN.iso

You do not have to order anything you can download the ISO ( s ) and burn them to CD or DVD yourself.

All you need is a machine with a CD or DVD recorder, some blanks and ISOrecorder ( if you have windoze ) http://isorecorder.alexfeinman.com/download/ISORecorderV2RC1.msi

http://isorecorder.alexfeinman.com/HowTo.htm

OR

Linux with cdrecord or k3b

http://forumz.tomshardware.com/software/memtest86-ISO-burning-HOWTO-ftopict230767.html

OR *BSD, Mac OS, or Unix with cd recording capabilities.
 

bmouring

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A good place to start is, like linux_0 stated, a liveCD(1) distribution(2) called knoppix. There are some distributions (distros as some call them) that are targeted for specific purposes, like a magor split is whether they're meant to be a livecd or installed. Another fun livecd distro to try is kororaa, although it's not nearly as useful as others.

Basically, the idea with a liveCD is to download a CD "image" which is burned to a CD, restart your PC with the CD in the drive and boot from the CD(3). This loads up a version of a GNU/Linux operating system.

Here are some helpful links if you want to give this stuff a spin:
Knoppix liveCD homepage, to download the cd image
Kororaa liveCD homepage
Instructions and a free download for burning a cd "iso" image, if you need it
Guide on how to enter most BIOS's, or just read your computer's screen on boot.

(1) A liveCD runs from the cdrom and memory, and does not install stuff to the hard drive, so when you remove the cd and reboot, Windows will be just how you left it. great for testing things out, and it can also be used to recover data from a Windows computer that won't boot up all the way anymore and can't be recovered in other ways.
(2) Distributions are collections of software that are put together by various groups that can vary widely, but ultimately all use the Linux kernel underneath (think of this as if there were differnet versions of Windows with different programs installed by default, including different "look and feel" stuff)
(3) You may need to reconfigure your BIOS to allow booting your system off of a CD and to do so before trying the harddrive, unfortunately there is no standard for entering the BIOS configuration and where in the configuration this exists. The above link is a fine start for figuring out how to get into the BIOS configuration and, once there, usually it's pretty easy to find the boot settings.
 

trencin

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Thanks a lot for all the help I will go get some blanks today and start it up. If I have some more questions I'll ask you guys. Thanks for all the help again.
 

bmouring

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Oh sure, make the reasonable suggestion that he reads related material and guides before jumping headlong into it... :D

Really though, it's the way to get the best experience out of the whole thing (read: prevents giving up before you get to the good stuff)
 

linux_0

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Oh sure, make the reasonable suggestion that he reads related material and guides before jumping headlong into it... :D

Really though, it's the way to get the best experience out of the whole thing (read: prevents giving up before you get to the good stuff)

:lol: :lol:

:D :D

It's very important to be patient and not give up on it too soon.
 

DaBigHurt

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I tried LiveCD for Ubuntu but it was very very slow right after the loading was complete, is this normal?

Ive been using, Windows my whole life, but I wanted to see what all the fuss is about, but seems like everytime I try using Linux I hit a bump in the road, I'm probably Jinxed. But anyway, How long should I wait till after the loading is complete in order to start using the OS from the CD?
 

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