Question Loading games increased out of nowhere

Aug 16, 2021
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Hello.

Yesterday I was playing Monster Hunter Stories 2, and the loading times for everything started to increase. For example, changing the monster that appears on the map, which was instantly now takes several seconds. Loading when changing zones is also taking more time.
Tried another game to see if it was just that game, and notice it also had increased loading times.

Changed the game (Monster Hunter) from my HDD to my SSD, but it didn't help. Tried restarting the Pc, Defrag the HDD, but nothing helped.

What could make the loading times increase? It's not the HDD, since I had the same problem with the SSD. If it was a memory leak, the restart should have helped. Out of the games I don't see anything taking more time than it normally would. Also don't see any fps drops or graphic problems during gameplay.

Specs:

GTX 1070 founder's edition
I7 9700
16GB ram
MSI Z390 gaming pro carbon
Seasonic Focus Gold 850W
Windows 10
 
Assuming the OS and now the game in question being played are now both resident on the SSD, disconnect the hard drive completely and retest...(a failing spinning drive even connected can drag an otherwise fine system down with background attempted file indexing, attempted reads, re-reads, etc., even if the apps you are running are not located on it; completely disconnecting the spinning drive rules out that as a potential issue)

On a different not, install and run HWMonitor.

THen install/run CPU-z

WIthin CPU-Z, select the 'Bench' - tab, then click on 'stress CPU'; let it run for 10 minutes.

While it is running , note temps and clock speeds sustained on all 8 cores of your i7-9700. (If temps are hitting 100C and then clock speeds drastically reducing subsequently , then you have certainly found an issue with temps/throttling. Normal behavior would be ~4.2 GHz for the first minute or 90 seconds, then a reduction to as low as 3 GHz in order to not exceed an average TDP of 65W, although this behavior could be easily overridden to the point of allowing or even causing overheating on a Z390 board via enabling MCE, disabling power limits, etc. Certainly a factory Intel cooler is inadequate for anything above meager stock operations.)

Once thru noting clock speeds/temps, you may click 'stop' within CPU-Z to stop the CPU stress load.
 
Aug 16, 2021
2
0
10
0
Assuming the OS and now the game in question being played are now both resident on the SSD, disconnect the hard drive completely and retest...(a failing spinning drive even connected can drag an otherwise fine system down with background attempted file indexing, attempted reads, re-reads, etc., even if the apps you are running are not located on it; completely disconnecting the spinning drive rules out that as a potential issue)

On a different not, install and run HWMonitor.

THen install/run CPU-z

WIthin CPU-Z, select the 'Bench' - tab, then click on 'stress CPU'; let it run for 10 minutes.

While it is running , note temps and clock speeds sustained on all 8 cores of your i7-9700. (If temps are hitting 100C and then clock speeds drastically reducing subsequently , then you have certainly found an issue with temps/throttling. Normal behavior would be ~4.2 GHz for the first minute or 90 seconds, then a reduction to as low as 3 GHz in order to not exceed an average TDP of 65W, although this behavior could be easily overridden to the point of allowing or even causing overheating on a Z390 board via enabling MCE, disabling power limits, etc. Certainly a factory Intel cooler is inadequate for anything above meager stock operations.)

Once thru noting clock speeds/temps, you may click 'stop' within CPU-Z to stop the CPU stress load.
I will try it when I get home.

I also forgot to post, but my Temps during gameplay stayed bellow 70°C for the CPU and bellow 50°C for the GPU. I also have aftermarket AIO cooler
 

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