Local Intranet Domain Name???

G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

I'm setting up an Extranet connection that will be accessible only to folks
at my company and our customers which whom have circuits connected to us.
Local IIS application will not be available thru Internet, however all our
direct customers need access to it.

I've going to setup DNS because I do not want my customers to use TCP/IP
address to access web application. Is there a particular naming convention
that should be used for internal domain names? .net, .local?

Any help would be appreciated.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

In news:%23%23kp5K8ZEHA.2792@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl,
DavidM <spam@spam.net> asked for help and I offered my suggestions below:
> I'm setting up an Extranet connection that will be accessible only to
> folks at my company and our customers which whom have circuits
> connected to us. Local IIS application will not be available thru
> Internet, however all our direct customers need access to it.
>
> I've going to setup DNS because I do not want my customers to use
> TCP/IP address to access web application. Is there a particular
> naming convention that should be used for internal domain names?
> .net, .local?
>
> Any help would be appreciated.

If all your asking is what name to choose, it could be any name you want it
to be. We just normally suggest to make it something otehr than your
external name.

You can make it .david if you like.

:)

--
Regards,
Ace

Please direct all replies ONLY to the Microsoft public newsgroups
so all can benefit.

This posting is provided "AS-IS" with no warranties or guarantees
and confers no rights.

Ace Fekay, MCSE 2003 & 2000, MCSA 2003 & 2000, MCSE+I, MCT, MVP
Microsoft Windows MVP - Active Directory

HAM AND EGGS: A day's work for a chicken;
A lifetime commitment for a pig.
--
=================================
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

"Ace Fekay [MVP]"
<PleaseSubstituteMyActualFirstName&LastNameHere@hotmail.com> wrote in
message news:uyYWvc8ZEHA.212@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> In news:%23%23kp5K8ZEHA.2792@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl,
> DavidM <spam@spam.net> asked for help and I offered my suggestions below:
> > I'm setting up an Extranet connection that will be accessible only to
> > folks at my company and our customers which whom have circuits
> > connected to us. Local IIS application will not be available thru
> > Internet, however all our direct customers need access to it.
> >
> > I've going to setup DNS because I do not want my customers to use
> > TCP/IP address to access web application. Is there a particular
> > naming convention that should be used for internal domain names?
> > .net, .local?
> >
> > Any help would be appreciated.
>
> If all your asking is what name to choose, it could be any name you want
it
> to be. We just normally suggest to make it something otehr than your
> external name.
>
> You can make it .david if you like.

Ace is correct in PRINCIPLE, but you must also pick a name
that your customers can "resolve" which is (almost) a separate
issue.

The issue is NOT the "name" so much as "HOW" the customer
DNS clients or DNS servers will resolve your name.

If your customers have no reference to your .David or .local
domain, and no way to recurse through THEIR (or the Internet)
Hierarchy to find it then they will never find your DNS servers.

Solutions include:

1) Use a public name and register it so that the customers
can use the public Internet DNS name space to "find" your
resources, BUT then filter out unwanted traffic with a
firewall or by using unroutable addresses (due to the direct
connection working for them.)

2) Have EACH customer hold a "secondary" for your DNS
zone(s) so that they can resolve your names directly.

3) Use Win2003 DNS (at the customer sites) to implement
either "conditional forwarding" or "stub zones".
The problem here is that each customer must have at
Win2003 DNS servers.

4) Do something similar to #3 using BIND -- this is probably
at least as bad as #3


--
Herb Martin
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

Lets discuss option #1.

I currently have a domain name registered that is facing the internet that
our customers use. I also have a server on our private network that our
customers need access to. Our customers all have frame relay circuits into
us... so direct connectivity is not an issue for them.

Are you saying that I should/can create a subdomain off my main domain and
add a 192.168.x.y address to this. This way the customers can still use
their normal Internet DNS servers and the Internet DNS servers will return
the private IP to access the subdomain?


"Herb Martin" <news@LearnQuick.com> wrote in message
news:eN$r8yBaEHA.2296@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> "Ace Fekay [MVP]"
> <PleaseSubstituteMyActualFirstName&LastNameHere@hotmail.com> wrote in
> message news:uyYWvc8ZEHA.212@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> > In news:%23%23kp5K8ZEHA.2792@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl,
> > DavidM <spam@spam.net> asked for help and I offered my suggestions
below:
> > > I'm setting up an Extranet connection that will be accessible only to
> > > folks at my company and our customers which whom have circuits
> > > connected to us. Local IIS application will not be available thru
> > > Internet, however all our direct customers need access to it.
> > >
> > > I've going to setup DNS because I do not want my customers to use
> > > TCP/IP address to access web application. Is there a particular
> > > naming convention that should be used for internal domain names?
> > > .net, .local?
> > >
> > > Any help would be appreciated.
> >
> > If all your asking is what name to choose, it could be any name you want
> it
> > to be. We just normally suggest to make it something otehr than your
> > external name.
> >
> > You can make it .david if you like.
>
> Ace is correct in PRINCIPLE, but you must also pick a name
> that your customers can "resolve" which is (almost) a separate
> issue.
>
> The issue is NOT the "name" so much as "HOW" the customer
> DNS clients or DNS servers will resolve your name.
>
> If your customers have no reference to your .David or .local
> domain, and no way to recurse through THEIR (or the Internet)
> Hierarchy to find it then they will never find your DNS servers.
>
> Solutions include:
>
> 1) Use a public name and register it so that the customers
> can use the public Internet DNS name space to "find" your
> resources, BUT then filter out unwanted traffic with a
> firewall or by using unroutable addresses (due to the direct
> connection working for them.)
>
> 2) Have EACH customer hold a "secondary" for your DNS
> zone(s) so that they can resolve your names directly.
>
> 3) Use Win2003 DNS (at the customer sites) to implement
> either "conditional forwarding" or "stub zones".
> The problem here is that each customer must have at
> Win2003 DNS servers.
>
> 4) Do something similar to #3 using BIND -- this is probably
> at least as bad as #3
>
>
> --
> Herb Martin
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

On Sun, 11 Jul 2004 22:45:45 -0500, "DavidM" <spam@spam.net> wrote:

>I'm setting up an Extranet connection that will be accessible only to folks
>at my company and our customers which whom have circuits connected to us.
>Local IIS application will not be available thru Internet, however all our
>direct customers need access to it.
>
>I've going to setup DNS because I do not want my customers to use TCP/IP
>address to access web application. Is there a particular naming convention
>that should be used for internal domain names? .net, .local?

Well unless you have the .net domain registered, you don't want to
use. You can use anything, but it's best not to use your public
domain name, and in your case, you may want a separate name from your
internal domain. I've used .lan for internal, but even a .extranet
would be fine.

Jeff
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

..lan, .extranet, or .local... I think .local sounds like the best.

I believe our Windows NT AD domain name includes .local on it... which would
be consistent with our internal naming convention.


"Jeff Cochran" <jeff.nospam@zina.com> wrote in message
news:40fbb927.73922815@msnews.microsoft.com...
> On Sun, 11 Jul 2004 22:45:45 -0500, "DavidM" <spam@spam.net> wrote:
>
> >I'm setting up an Extranet connection that will be accessible only to
folks
> >at my company and our customers which whom have circuits connected to us.
> >Local IIS application will not be available thru Internet, however all
our
> >direct customers need access to it.
> >
> >I've going to setup DNS because I do not want my customers to use TCP/IP
> >address to access web application. Is there a particular naming
convention
> >that should be used for internal domain names? .net, .local?
>
> Well unless you have the .net domain registered, you don't want to
> use. You can use anything, but it's best not to use your public
> domain name, and in your case, you may want a separate name from your
> internal domain. I've used .lan for internal, but even a .extranet
> would be fine.
>
> Jeff
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

"DavidM" <spam@spam.net> wrote in message
news:e5AKehDaEHA.808@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> Lets discuss option #1.
>
> I currently have a domain name registered that is facing the internet that
> our customers use. I also have a server on our private network that our
> customers need access to. Our customers all have frame relay circuits
into
> us... so direct connectivity is not an issue for them.

> Are you saying that I should/can create a subdomain off my main domain and
> add a 192.168.x.y address to this.

Of course you can.

You can put any addresses you wish in there.

DNS doesn't care if they are good, bad, or indifferent.

BTW: 192.168.x.y addresses are VALID IP addresses --
just not valid on the 'backbone of the Internet.'


> This way the customers can still use
> their normal Internet DNS servers and the Internet DNS servers will return
> the private IP to access the subdomain?

Yes, BUT they have to be able to route to you AND
they must not be using ranges which conflict with your
ranges.

My (best guess) would be to suggest you use 172.29.0.0 to
avoid the ranges used by your clients.
(but if everyone takes that advice it will defeat the purpose.)

First consider that many people use 192.168.x.0 or 10.x.y.0,
and anyone doing "ICS" must use 192.168.0.x -- they have
no choice but this is only a direct issue for the smallest
companies/home users.

Bottom line: You must coordinate the ranges used by you
and your clients so they don't overlap since "The Internet"
is not coordinating these locally administered ranges.


--
Herb Martin


>
> "Herb Martin" <news@LearnQuick.com> wrote in message
> news:eN$r8yBaEHA.2296@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> > "Ace Fekay [MVP]"
> > <PleaseSubstituteMyActualFirstName&LastNameHere@hotmail.com> wrote in
> > message news:uyYWvc8ZEHA.212@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> > > In news:%23%23kp5K8ZEHA.2792@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl,
> > > DavidM <spam@spam.net> asked for help and I offered my suggestions
> below:
> > > > I'm setting up an Extranet connection that will be accessible only
to
> > > > folks at my company and our customers which whom have circuits
> > > > connected to us. Local IIS application will not be available thru
> > > > Internet, however all our direct customers need access to it.
> > > >
> > > > I've going to setup DNS because I do not want my customers to use
> > > > TCP/IP address to access web application. Is there a particular
> > > > naming convention that should be used for internal domain names?
> > > > .net, .local?
> > > >
> > > > Any help would be appreciated.
> > >
> > > If all your asking is what name to choose, it could be any name you
want
> > it
> > > to be. We just normally suggest to make it something otehr than your
> > > external name.
> > >
> > > You can make it .david if you like.
> >
> > Ace is correct in PRINCIPLE, but you must also pick a name
> > that your customers can "resolve" which is (almost) a separate
> > issue.
> >
> > The issue is NOT the "name" so much as "HOW" the customer
> > DNS clients or DNS servers will resolve your name.
> >
> > If your customers have no reference to your .David or .local
> > domain, and no way to recurse through THEIR (or the Internet)
> > Hierarchy to find it then they will never find your DNS servers.
> >
> > Solutions include:
> >
> > 1) Use a public name and register it so that the customers
> > can use the public Internet DNS name space to "find" your
> > resources, BUT then filter out unwanted traffic with a
> > firewall or by using unroutable addresses (due to the direct
> > connection working for them.)
> >
> > 2) Have EACH customer hold a "secondary" for your DNS
> > zone(s) so that they can resolve your names directly.
> >
> > 3) Use Win2003 DNS (at the customer sites) to implement
> > either "conditional forwarding" or "stub zones".
> > The problem here is that each customer must have at
> > Win2003 DNS servers.
> >
> > 4) Do something similar to #3 using BIND -- this is probably
> > at least as bad as #3
> >
> >
> > --
> > Herb Martin
> >
> >
>
>
 

obiwan

Distinguished
Feb 16, 2001
90
0
18,630
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

> If all your asking is what name to choose, it could be any name you
> want it to be. We just normally suggest to make it something otehr
> than your external name.
>
> You can make it .david if you like.

Well ... in principle it's correct Ace, although it mainly depends
from how the remote clients will handle name resolution; if the
"clients" will be using David's DNS servers then he may use
whatever he wants, but if the remote clients have their own
DNS servers then I'd suggest using a subdomain of the
master company domain, so, if the public domain for the
company is (e.g.) "foobar.com" David may as well use
something like "wan.foobar.com" btw he will need to set
up his DNS servers to handle it, but this way the external
clients won't have resolution problems at all whatever
DNS they'll decide to use (theirs or David's ones)
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

In news:%23BnFlGCaEHA.2812@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl,
ObiWan <anzen.NO@SPAM.gmx.net> asked for help and I offered my suggestions
below:
>> If all your asking is what name to choose, it could be any name you
>> want it to be. We just normally suggest to make it something otehr
>> than your external name.
>>
>> You can make it .david if you like.
>
> Well ... in principle it's correct Ace, although it mainly depends
> from how the remote clients will handle name resolution; if the
> "clients" will be using David's DNS servers then he may use
> whatever he wants, but if the remote clients have their own
> DNS servers then I'd suggest using a subdomain of the
> master company domain, so, if the public domain for the
> company is (e.g.) "foobar.com" David may as well use
> something like "wan.foobar.com" btw he will need to set
> up his DNS servers to handle it, but this way the external
> clients won't have resolution problems at all whatever
> DNS they'll decide to use (theirs or David's ones)

I know you and Herb elaborated a bit more on the issue, which is cool and
thanks!

But just want to point out I was just directly answering the poster's main
question about what name to use. David will have to provide logistics
support, supply the name to connect to their extranet site, maybe even
supply suffixes to make it work (additional overhead). I agree as well that
a subdomain of his public domain maybe an easier name for the users to
remember.

--
Regards,
Ace

Please direct all replies ONLY to the Microsoft public newsgroups
so all can benefit.

This posting is provided "AS-IS" with no warranties or guarantees
and confers no rights.

Ace Fekay, MCSE 2003 & 2000, MCSA 2003 & 2000, MCSE+I, MCT, MVP
Microsoft Windows MVP - Active Directory

HAM AND EGGS: A day's work for a chicken;
A lifetime commitment for a pig.
--
=================================
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

I can go into the AT&T Control Panel to manage my Internet DNS. Are you
suggesting that I create a subdomain for my private webserver... and add its
192.168 (Internet non-routable IP) to it...

Then when the customers type in subdomain.mydomain.com -- my DNS server will
return to them the 192.168 address?

If this works... this would keep me from having to install my own private
DNS and having the customers adding a forward lookup.

I guess the only drawback to this approach is if not all my customers have
direct Internet access.... Then they would not be able to resolve.

Opinions?



"ObiWan" <anzen.NO@SPAM.gmx.net> wrote in message
news:%23BnFlGCaEHA.2812@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
>
> > If all your asking is what name to choose, it could be any name you
> > want it to be. We just normally suggest to make it something otehr
> > than your external name.
> >
> > You can make it .david if you like.
>
> Well ... in principle it's correct Ace, although it mainly depends
> from how the remote clients will handle name resolution; if the
> "clients" will be using David's DNS servers then he may use
> whatever he wants, but if the remote clients have their own
> DNS servers then I'd suggest using a subdomain of the
> master company domain, so, if the public domain for the
> company is (e.g.) "foobar.com" David may as well use
> something like "wan.foobar.com" btw he will need to set
> up his DNS servers to handle it, but this way the external
> clients won't have resolution problems at all whatever
> DNS they'll decide to use (theirs or David's ones)
>
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

I like this approach in using a subdomain. My only issue with this may be
that not all customers have direct Internet connection. Some use dialup
when they need it. Arrghh

Regarding domain names... assuming I cannot use a subdomain, I'm still
wondering what a normal conveniention woudl be. Currently today... we us
..com for our public domain. For our private webserver/DNS, I created the
same domain but used a .net extension. I'm now thinking that .net probably
would not be a good idea... and should use .local to keep the customers DNS
servers from trying to resolve name thru Internet?


"Ace Fekay [MVP]"
<PleaseSubstituteMyActualFirstName&LastNameHere@hotmail.com> wrote in
message news:%23REXFZCaEHA.3944@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> In news:%23BnFlGCaEHA.2812@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl,
> ObiWan <anzen.NO@SPAM.gmx.net> asked for help and I offered my suggestions
> below:
> >> If all your asking is what name to choose, it could be any name you
> >> want it to be. We just normally suggest to make it something otehr
> >> than your external name.
> >>
> >> You can make it .david if you like.
> >
> > Well ... in principle it's correct Ace, although it mainly depends
> > from how the remote clients will handle name resolution; if the
> > "clients" will be using David's DNS servers then he may use
> > whatever he wants, but if the remote clients have their own
> > DNS servers then I'd suggest using a subdomain of the
> > master company domain, so, if the public domain for the
> > company is (e.g.) "foobar.com" David may as well use
> > something like "wan.foobar.com" btw he will need to set
> > up his DNS servers to handle it, but this way the external
> > clients won't have resolution problems at all whatever
> > DNS they'll decide to use (theirs or David's ones)
>
> I know you and Herb elaborated a bit more on the issue, which is cool and
> thanks!
>
> But just want to point out I was just directly answering the poster's main
> question about what name to use. David will have to provide logistics
> support, supply the name to connect to their extranet site, maybe even
> supply suffixes to make it work (additional overhead). I agree as well
that
> a subdomain of his public domain maybe an easier name for the users to
> remember.
>
> --
> Regards,
> Ace
>
> Please direct all replies ONLY to the Microsoft public newsgroups
> so all can benefit.
>
> This posting is provided "AS-IS" with no warranties or guarantees
> and confers no rights.
>
> Ace Fekay, MCSE 2003 & 2000, MCSA 2003 & 2000, MCSE+I, MCT, MVP
> Microsoft Windows MVP - Active Directory
>
> HAM AND EGGS: A day's work for a chicken;
> A lifetime commitment for a pig.
> --
> =================================
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

"DavidM" <spam@spam.net> wrote in message
news:OwDK8iDaEHA.3112@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> I can go into the AT&T Control Panel to manage my Internet DNS. Are you
> suggesting that I create a subdomain for my private webserver... and add
its
> 192.168 (Internet non-routable IP) to it...
>
> Then when the customers type in subdomain.mydomain.com -- my DNS server
will
> return to them the 192.168 address?
>
> If this works... this would keep me from having to install my own private
> DNS and having the customers adding a forward lookup.

Any customer able to resovle your Names to your addresses
will get back the address (yes, I know it is redundant.)

Any customer with an address will be able to contact you IF
THAT address is routable from them to you.

You are going to have MORE trouble explaining the "routing"
to your customer than explaining the "DNS."

And remember those address range clashes or overlaps.....

> I guess the only drawback to this approach is if not all my customers have
> direct Internet access.... Then they would not be able to resolve.

Then they will need to hold a "secondary" for your resources;
or you will have to (ughghgh) support them using a "hosts" file
on EVERY legitimate/possible client machine.

--
Herb Martin


>
> Opinions?
>
>
>
> "ObiWan" <anzen.NO@SPAM.gmx.net> wrote in message
> news:%23BnFlGCaEHA.2812@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> >
> > > If all your asking is what name to choose, it could be any name you
> > > want it to be. We just normally suggest to make it something otehr
> > > than your external name.
> > >
> > > You can make it .david if you like.
> >
> > Well ... in principle it's correct Ace, although it mainly depends
> > from how the remote clients will handle name resolution; if the
> > "clients" will be using David's DNS servers then he may use
> > whatever he wants, but if the remote clients have their own
> > DNS servers then I'd suggest using a subdomain of the
> > master company domain, so, if the public domain for the
> > company is (e.g.) "foobar.com" David may as well use
> > something like "wan.foobar.com" btw he will need to set
> > up his DNS servers to handle it, but this way the external
> > clients won't have resolution problems at all whatever
> > DNS they'll decide to use (theirs or David's ones)
> >
> >
> >
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

In news:O0BXLkDaEHA.2812@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl,
DavidM <spam@spam.net> asked for help and I offered my suggestions below:
> I like this approach in using a subdomain. My only issue with this
> may be that not all customers have direct Internet connection. Some
> use dialup when they need it. Arrghh

I guess if they dialin directly it won't matter.

>
> Regarding domain names... assuming I cannot use a subdomain, I'm still
> wondering what a normal conveniention woudl be. Currently today...
> we us .com for our public domain. For our private webserver/DNS, I
> created the same domain but used a .net extension. I'm now thinking
> that .net probably would not be a good idea...

That's a common thing. :)

> and should use .local
> to keep the customers DNS servers from trying to resolve name thru
> Internet?
>

Not necessarily. Assuming you;re talking about your AD name, its just
suggested to use something else other than your actual external name. The
name you choose for the TLD will not dictate whether it will resolve
externally or not. DNS will answer the best it can, if it can't (such as if
the zone doesn't exist -its not authorative for the zone) then it will
attempt a recursion either thru the Roots or a forwarder.


--
Regards,
Ace

Please direct all replies ONLY to the Microsoft public newsgroups
so all can benefit.

This posting is provided "AS-IS" with no warranties or guarantees
and confers no rights.

Ace Fekay, MCSE 2003 & 2000, MCSA 2003 & 2000, MCSE+I, MCT, MVP
Microsoft Windows MVP - Active Directory

HAM AND EGGS: A day's work for a chicken;
A lifetime commitment for a pig.
--
=================================
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

"DavidM" <spam@spam.net> wrote in message
news:O0BXLkDaEHA.2812@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> I like this approach in using a subdomain. My only issue with this may be
> that not all customers have direct Internet connection. Some use dialup
> when they need it. Arrghh
>
> Regarding domain names... assuming I cannot use a subdomain, I'm still
> wondering what a normal conveniention woudl be. Currently today... we us
> .com for our public domain. For our private webserver/DNS, I created the
> same domain but used a .net extension. I'm now thinking that .net
probably
> would not be a good idea... and should use .local to keep the customers
DNS
> servers from trying to resolve name thru Internet?
>

You can use "Local" or "Private" with pretty good
belief that these will not (ever?) be used on the public
Internet.

That your clients are not permanently connected to the
Internet brings up the likelyhood that some of them might
figure out that YOU will route their traffic to the Internet
for them -- unless you filter out their source addresses from
any but your desired destination networks.



--
Herb Martin


>
> "Ace Fekay [MVP]"
> <PleaseSubstituteMyActualFirstName&LastNameHere@hotmail.com> wrote in
> message news:%23REXFZCaEHA.3944@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > In news:%23BnFlGCaEHA.2812@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl,
> > ObiWan <anzen.NO@SPAM.gmx.net> asked for help and I offered my
suggestions
> > below:
> > >> If all your asking is what name to choose, it could be any name you
> > >> want it to be. We just normally suggest to make it something otehr
> > >> than your external name.
> > >>
> > >> You can make it .david if you like.
> > >
> > > Well ... in principle it's correct Ace, although it mainly depends
> > > from how the remote clients will handle name resolution; if the
> > > "clients" will be using David's DNS servers then he may use
> > > whatever he wants, but if the remote clients have their own
> > > DNS servers then I'd suggest using a subdomain of the
> > > master company domain, so, if the public domain for the
> > > company is (e.g.) "foobar.com" David may as well use
> > > something like "wan.foobar.com" btw he will need to set
> > > up his DNS servers to handle it, but this way the external
> > > clients won't have resolution problems at all whatever
> > > DNS they'll decide to use (theirs or David's ones)
> >
> > I know you and Herb elaborated a bit more on the issue, which is cool
and
> > thanks!
> >
> > But just want to point out I was just directly answering the poster's
main
> > question about what name to use. David will have to provide logistics
> > support, supply the name to connect to their extranet site, maybe even
> > supply suffixes to make it work (additional overhead). I agree as well
> that
> > a subdomain of his public domain maybe an easier name for the users to
> > remember.
> >
> > --
> > Regards,
> > Ace
> >
> > Please direct all replies ONLY to the Microsoft public newsgroups
> > so all can benefit.
> >
> > This posting is provided "AS-IS" with no warranties or guarantees
> > and confers no rights.
> >
> > Ace Fekay, MCSE 2003 & 2000, MCSA 2003 & 2000, MCSE+I, MCT, MVP
> > Microsoft Windows MVP - Active Directory
> >
> > HAM AND EGGS: A day's work for a chicken;
> > A lifetime commitment for a pig.
> > --
> > =================================
> >
> >
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

> > Regarding domain names... assuming I cannot use a subdomain, I'm still
> > wondering what a normal conveniention woudl be. Currently today...
> > we us .com for our public domain. For our private webserver/DNS, I
> > created the same domain but used a .net extension. I'm now thinking
> > that .net probably would not be a good idea...

..net is NOT a "good idea" unless you buy the name on the Internet.

It is not a good idea because if someone (legitimately) reserves that
name it can screw you and in any case it is the 'wrong thing to do.'

Using whatever.net is FINE if you buy that on the Internet (even
if you do nothing but "park" it so that no one else can use it.)

I own LearnQuick.org etc.....

--
Herb Martin


"Ace Fekay [MVP]"
<PleaseSubstituteMyActualFirstName&LastNameHere@hotmail.com> wrote in
message news:#t3NRzDaEHA.2016@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> In news:O0BXLkDaEHA.2812@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl,
> DavidM <spam@spam.net> asked for help and I offered my suggestions below:
> > I like this approach in using a subdomain. My only issue with this
> > may be that not all customers have direct Internet connection. Some
> > use dialup when they need it. Arrghh
>
> I guess if they dialin directly it won't matter.
>
> >
> > Regarding domain names... assuming I cannot use a subdomain, I'm still
> > wondering what a normal conveniention woudl be. Currently today...
> > we us .com for our public domain. For our private webserver/DNS, I
> > created the same domain but used a .net extension. I'm now thinking
> > that .net probably would not be a good idea...
>
> That's a common thing. :)
>
> > and should use .local
> > to keep the customers DNS servers from trying to resolve name thru
> > Internet?
> >
>
> Not necessarily. Assuming you;re talking about your AD name, its just
> suggested to use something else other than your actual external name. The
> name you choose for the TLD will not dictate whether it will resolve
> externally or not. DNS will answer the best it can, if it can't (such as
if
> the zone doesn't exist -its not authorative for the zone) then it will
> attempt a recursion either thru the Roots or a forwarder.
>
>
> --
> Regards,
> Ace
>
> Please direct all replies ONLY to the Microsoft public newsgroups
> so all can benefit.
>
> This posting is provided "AS-IS" with no warranties or guarantees
> and confers no rights.
>
> Ace Fekay, MCSE 2003 & 2000, MCSA 2003 & 2000, MCSE+I, MCT, MVP
> Microsoft Windows MVP - Active Directory
>
> HAM AND EGGS: A day's work for a chicken;
> A lifetime commitment for a pig.
> --
> =================================
>
>
 

obiwan

Distinguished
Feb 16, 2001
90
0
18,630
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

> I know you and Herb elaborated a bit more
> on the issue, which is cool and thanks!

Hi Ace; not "bashing" you at all, just trying to
help sorting out things a bit, your answer was
perfectly correct btw and you're right writing
that all the poster asked was "which name"
I just tried to figure out the most "direct" way
to achieve what he wrote "behind the lines"
<g> btw, as you pointed out this is far from a
complete solution and there will be more work
involved, but again, I tried to keep the answer
somewhat short

All the best :) !
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

In news:uaf8PoCaEHA.996@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl,
ObiWan <anzen.NO@SPAM.gmx.net> asked for help and I offered my suggestions
below:
>> I know you and Herb elaborated a bit more
>> on the issue, which is cool and thanks!
>
> Hi Ace; not "bashing" you at all, just trying to
> help sorting out things a bit, your answer was
> perfectly correct btw and you're right writing
> that all the poster asked was "which name"
> I just tried to figure out the most "direct" way
> to achieve what he wrote "behind the lines"
> <g> btw, as you pointed out this is far from a
> complete solution and there will be more work
> involved, but again, I tried to keep the answer
> somewhat short
>
> All the best :) !

I know you weren't bashing or anything! :) You were right to point that
out. It's all good and surely helps the posters here.

Cheers!!!
:)

--
Regards,
Ace

Please direct all replies ONLY to the Microsoft public newsgroups
so all can benefit.

This posting is provided "AS-IS" with no warranties or guarantees
and confers no rights.

Ace Fekay, MCSE 2003 & 2000, MCSA 2003 & 2000, MCSE+I, MCT, MVP
Microsoft Windows MVP - Active Directory

HAM AND EGGS: A day's work for a chicken;
A lifetime commitment for a pig.
--
=================================
 

obiwan

Distinguished
Feb 16, 2001
90
0
18,630
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

> we use .com for our public domain. For our private webserver/DNS, I
> created the same domain but used a .net extension. I'm now thinking
> that .net probably would not be a good idea... and should use .local
> to keep the customers DNS servers from trying to resolve name thru
> Internet?

Well, not really an RFC <g> but I usually stick with ".lan" or ".wan"
when it comes to private DNS namespaces; both TLDs aren't
registered and I doubt they'll ever be :)