Question Looking for a good cpu cooler: 3700x

Feb 8, 2020
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i have been looking for a good CPU cooler that can help me get my temps around 60c i'm currently running the stock cooler and its just not cutting it
anyone have any suggestions
 
Just used an NH-D15 on a friend's 9700K build....; darn nice cooler, ~64C (CPU-Z/cpu stress test) under all cores at 4.6 GHz...must strain to even barely hear the fans even when ramped up and case cover is removed!
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
D15 is serious overkill for most cpus. You can get the same results from smaller, cheaper coolers as long as the wattage allows. Bigger does not mean colder after a certain point.

Cooler choice depends on several things, budget not withstanding. Case dimensions first and foremost. Cpu clearance height will determine the limits of cooler choice ranges. Usage is next. If rendering, editing or hard core game usage or if websurfing, light gaming etc. Then comes OC or boost, that'll narrow down what range of coolers are applicable, after tossing out any choices that don't fit the first and second.

Lastly, but not least, comes market. It's all well and good to sort out the best applicable cooler, only to find its taxes or import fees and shipping put it well beyond acceptable budget concerns.

You'll end up with 3-4 choices out of hundreds, then it's a matter of preference.

And that's if an AIO might not be a better choice.

The best style coolers for most Ryzens isn't towers nor AIO's, but downdraft style, like the stock cooler. BeQuiet Darkrock TF or Noctua NH-C14/S etc. Reason is VRM cooling is quite important when running Ryzens at boost speeds and voltages and many mobo's lack decent heatsinking and run hot VRM's. Downdraft coolers go a long way to rectifying that issue.
 
Last edited:

86zx

Upstanding
Nov 1, 2019
403
77
290
14
D15 is serious overkill for most cpus. You can get the same results from smaller, cheaper coolers as long as the wattage allows. Bigger does not mean colder after a certain point.

Cooler choice depends on several things, budget not withstanding. Case dimensions first and foremost. Cpu clearance height will determine the limits of cooler choice ranges. Usage is next. If rendering, editing or hard core game usage or if websurfing, light gaming etc. Then comes OC or boost, that'll narrow down what range of coolers are applicable, after tossing out any choices that don't fit the first and second.

Lastly, but not least, comes market. It's all well and good to sort out the best applicable cooler, only to find its taxes or import fees and shipping put it well beyond acceptable budget concerns.

You'll end up with 3-4 choices out of hundreds, then it's a matter of preference.

And that's if an AIO might not be a better choice.

The best style coolers for most Ryzens isn't towers nor AIO's, but downdraft style, like the stock cooler. BeQuiet Darkrock TF or Noctua NH-C14/S etc. Reason is VRM cooling is quite important when running Ryzens at boost speeds and voltages and many mobo's lack decent heatsinking and run hot VRM's. Downdraft coolers go a long way to rectifying that issue.
It doesn’t sound like he’s overclocking and most downdraft coolers are fairly small so it’s likely that they won’t be silent or cool it below 70c, not that that matters much because they are designed to run within certain temps so even 80c is fine
 

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