Looking for advice and information

Krazedhermit

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Mar 24, 2002
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Hi there folks.

Within a few months I was thinking about upgrading my processor cooling (stock fan and heatsink with stock thermal pad) on my P4 3.4ghz. But I've two questions, one is more on y'alls opinions and the second is information.

Lets do information first!
Okay. So I'm aware that if you're going to put thermal grease on a heatsink/processor it is best to do it before the thermal pad on the stock heatsink melts and gets in the little grooves of the processor. The question is, can you clean the processor enough to put new grease on it AFTER having the thermal pad on the processor for so long? Or does one have to buy a completely new processor? (I hope not)

Now for the advice. I'm thinking about upgrading to liquid cooling. I was wanting to know a good kit? Something that a beginner at putting hardware together could use? I built my computer, but I don't want to have to modify anything.

Thanks in advance!
 

endyen

Splendid
I'll answer the first part of your question, but mozz will be along soon to get the second part ( I hope)
You can clean the chip with something like rubbing, or isoprpal alcohol. If you have any goof off, or ether laying around, that will also work.
Water for the P4e chips is a good idea. Just watch out for using disimilar metals, esp copper and aluminium, in the system.
 

slvr_phoenix

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Dec 31, 2007
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Just watch out for using disimilar metals, esp copper and aluminium, in the system.
Aren't there additives that prevent corrosion from this?

<pre>Antec Sonata 2x120mm
P4C 2.6
Asus P4P800Dlx
2x512MB CorsairXMS3200C2
Leadtek A6600GT TDH
RAID1 2xHitachi 60GB
BENQ 16X DVD+/-RW
Altec Lansing 251
NEC FE990 19"CRT</pre><p>
 

Krazedhermit

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I don't know what kind of metal my P4 has.. The metal is silver in color. So I'd want to say aluminium. As it stands my P4 runs at 38-40C idle and 55-56 under heavy load. I play games alot so it stays under the heavy load quite frequently.

So, anyways. Can I just use paper towels to apply the alcohol? Or do I need some other material?
 

endyen

Splendid
I use cotton swabs, they work well. No lint please.
The metal we are talking about is actually inside the enclosed liquid system. Hopefully no liquid will ever touch any part of the chip itself, while the system is working
 

mozzartusm

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Sep 17, 2004
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You may get alot of different opinoins on this issue, so here is what you need to keep in mind when making your decsion. First and probably most important is, Will this product satisfy my needs and concerns. So based on what you asked here is my suggestion.

Now for the advice. I'm thinking about upgrading to liquid cooling. I was wanting to know a good kit? Something that a beginner at putting hardware together could use? I built my computer, but I don't want to have to modify anything
Your new to liquid cooling and even though it isnt that complicated after you have done it for awhile I certainly can understand how overwhelming it can be at first. My first kit was the Thermaltake Big Water. It is designed in a very simple way, and is very user friendly for a beginner. It has a very nice Waterblock and the pump will do just fine for this size system. The radiator and fan can be mounted on the outside or inside of the case. The retension brackets for the socket 775 are well made and secure the waterblock to the CPU very nicely. You will find that while you definetly need to use thermal compound, you dont have to be quite as tedious with it as you would with a regular heatsink and fan. They are priced fairly well at around $140.00 to $160.00 depending on where you get it. There are many other options, but from experience "I have the same CPU that you have" this kit will do the job and do very well.
<A HREF="http://www.zipzoomfly.com/jsp/ProductDetail.jsp?ProductCode=370502" target="_new">http://www.zipzoomfly.com/jsp/ProductDetail.jsp?ProductCode=370502</A>



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slvr_phoenix

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Dec 31, 2007
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Yes, but its alot simpler when you stick to one metal IMO.
I certainly won't argue that. :) I was just worried for a second that the products to solve that issue were proving not to work in PCs ... or something scary like that.

<pre>Antec Sonata 2x120mm
P4C 2.6
Asus P4P800Dlx
2x512MB CorsairXMS3200C2
Leadtek A6600GT TDH
RAID1 2xHitachi 60GB
BENQ 16X DVD+/-RW
Altec Lansing 251
NEC FE990 19"CRT</pre><p>
 

Cybercraig

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I recommend lapping any heatsink you are planning on keeping long-term. It's just time well spent.

Abit IS7 - 3.0C @ 3.6ghz - Mushkin PC4000 (2 X 512) - Sapphire 9800Pro - TT 420 watt Pure Power
Samsung 120gb ATA-100 - Maxtor 40gb ATA - 100
Sony DRU-510A - Yellowtail Merlot
 

Krazedhermit

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Mar 24, 2002
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That is nice. But I was looking for a more external cooling system. I'm not terribly sure I've the room in my case what with the wires and such. Any suggestions for an external cooling system.

Oh. And what is "lapping" a heatsink?

<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by krazedhermit on 02/23/05 09:02 AM.</EM></FONT></P>
 
using very fine sand/glass/(what ever you want to call it) paper so smooth the surface of a heatsink/waterblock to a mirror finish

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