Aug 20, 2021
33
0
40
1
I currently have a 1 TB SATA Solid State Hybrid Drive with 8 GB flash acceleration cache in my HP Sprout 23-s020 computer. I was thinking of getting a Western Digital 2TB WD Blue 3D NAND Internal PC SSD 2.5".
Would I need the SATA to USB Cable - USB 3.0 to 2.5” SATA III Hard Drive Adapter for cloning my current drive? And then use Acronis True Image for the cloning?
Any other things I need to know before starting this process?
Would I notice a difference with this change in SSD? What areas would there be improvement?
 
Yes, you can use the tool to clone to the SSD. However, you'll have to expand the partition from there as the clone may not expand it for you. Or you can make a separate partition out of the leftover space if you want.

Otherwise you shouldn't have to do anything else. You'll see an improvement in loading times for sure.
 
Reactions: Tommy Sawyer
Aug 20, 2021
33
0
40
1
Yes, you can use the tool to clone to the SSD. However, you'll have to expand the partition from there as the clone may not expand it for you. Or you can make a separate partition out of the leftover space if you want.

What exactly am I doing when expanding the partition ... and I'm guessing you mean on the new 2 TB SSD, right? Why am I making a separate partition?
How do you expand the partition?
 
What exactly am I doing when expanding the partition ... and I'm guessing you mean on the new 2 TB SSD, right? Why am I making a separate partition?
How do you expand the partition?
Judging by the PC, you only have one slot for storage. If you're the kind of person who likes to refresh Windows once in a while, having a separate partition will allow you to have a place to store data so it won't get erased from the Refresh/Reset. But if you have a back up drive for this, then never mind. You can expand the partition by using Windows' Disk Management tool in Control Panel -> Administrative Tools -> Computer Management. If it won't let you for some reason (like the boot loader partition is somehow in the way), then you can use some other partitioning tool.

Oh I forgot one thing: Do not access the clone partition from the original boot drive. i.e., don't verify the clone was successful by trying to access when booted from the SSHD. Replace the SSHD with the SSD and verify that it can get into Windows. If you try to access the clone from the original boot drive, Windows will generate a new partition ID for it. This can be a problem, as cloned Windows is expecting the original partition ID.
 
Reactions: Tommy Sawyer
Aug 20, 2021
33
0
40
1
Yes, you can use the tool to clone to the SSD. However, you'll have to expand the partition from there as the clone may not expand it for you. Or you can make a separate partition out of the leftover space if you want.

Otherwise you shouldn't have to do anything else. You'll see an improvement in loading times for sure.
I also have recovery image D: on that drive ... about 18Gb of about 20Gb. That will just clone over how it's supposed to, correct?
 
I also have recovery image D: on that drive ... about 18Gb of about 20Gb. That will just clone over how it's supposed to, correct?
Cloning will copy over everything. Also it'll be very likely that the D:\ partition will be in the way of C:\, so you'll have to use a third party partition tool to expand C:\

I've used stuff from easeUS and MiniTool. I'm sure someone else may have another recommendation.
 
Reactions: Tommy Sawyer
Aug 20, 2021
33
0
40
1
Judging by the PC, you only have one slot for storage. If you're the kind of person who likes to refresh Windows once in a while, having a separate partition will allow you to have a place to store data so it won't get erased from the Refresh/Reset. But if you have a back up drive for this, then never mind. You can expand the partition by using Windows' Disk Management tool in Control Panel -> Administrative Tools -> Computer Management. If it won't let you for some reason (like the boot loader partition is somehow in the way), then you can use some other partitioning tool.

Oh I forgot one thing: Do not access the clone partition from the original boot drive. i.e., don't verify the clone was successful by trying to access when booted from the SSHD. Replace the SSHD with the SSD and verify that it can get into Windows. If you try to access the clone from the original boot drive, Windows will generate a new partition ID for it. This can be a problem, as cloned Windows is expecting the original partition ID.
Yes, one slot. So basically run the clone to the new drive and when it's done, unplug the SATA usb and then swap out the drives and then start up and see what happens?
So in opinion a separate partition is better than an expanded one?
 
Yeah, you have to use a third party tool to expand the C:\ drive.

Alternatively if you don't care about the recovery partition, after cloning you should be able to delete the two partitions after the C:\ drive on the SSD and still retain the Windows recovery environment at least. You can always keep the partition on the SSHD if you care about doing a "proper" factory reset.
 
Reactions: Tommy Sawyer

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
146,055
9,015
175,340
22,748
You can clone directly from the current 1TB to the new 2TB, in a proper enclosure.
Using Macrium, you can also manipulate the partition sizes in the process. No 3rd party tool needed.


-----------------------------
Specific steps for a successful clone operation:
-----------------------------
Verify the actual used space on the current drive is significantly below the size of the new SSD
Download and install Macrium Reflect (or Samsung Data Migration, if a Samsung SSD)
If you are cloning from a SATA drive to PCIe/NVMe, install the relevant driver for this new NVMe/PCIe drive.
Power off
Disconnect ALL drives except the current C and the new SSD
Power up
Run the Macrium Reflect (or Samsung Data Migration)
Select ALL the partitions on the existing C drive

If you are going from a smaller drive to a larger, by default, the target partition size will be the same as the Source. You probably don't want that
You can manipulate the size of the partitions on the target (larger)drive
Click on "Cloned Partition Properties", and you can specifiy the resulting partition size, to even include the whole thing

Click the 'Clone' button
Wait until it is done
When it finishes, power off
Disconnect ALL drives except for the new SSD
This is to allow the system to try to boot from ONLY the SSD
Swap the SATA cables around so that the new drive is connected to the same SATA port as the old drive
Power up, and verify the BIOS boot order
If good, continue the power up

It should boot from the new drive, just like the old drive.
Maybe reboot a time or two, just to make sure.

If it works, and it should, all is good.

Later, reconnect the old drive and wipe all partitions on it.
This will probably require the commandline diskpart function, and the clean command.

Ask questions if anything is unclear.
-----------------------------
 
Reactions: Tommy Sawyer

ASK THE COMMUNITY