Looking to upgrade from AMD fx-6350

Ninjafoof

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Sep 4, 2015
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Hi everyone!

So, I am looking to upgrade from my current AMD FX-6350 to an Intel CPU. Currently, I'm looking at the i7-4790k and the i7-5820k, as well as a Corsair h100i GTX to cool the CPU, as I will be doing some overclocking. So, here's the thing: since I have to get a new mobo anyways, should I still stick with the -4790k, or just throw down the extra cash and go for the -5820k? It'll be roughly $230 USD more for the x99 build.

Other thoughts:

I'd be getting 16gb of DDR4, the ASUS x99-A mobo for the, obviously, x99 build, or the ASUS ROG Maximus VII Hero for the z97 build. Also, theoretically, if I go with the z97 build, I could get a second GPU and run SLI.

Furthermore, my current system specs are:

AMD fx-6350, OC'd to 4.2ghz
Hyper212 EVO
16gb DDR3
MSI NVidia 970
Corsair HX1050 PSU
Corsair 500r Black case with window side-panel mod
Widows 10 64bit Pro Edition
 
A four core, four Hyperthread will last for many years. i5s are still good-to go. If a game NEEDS more than four cores/modules, it will have no market. There is almost no hardware for it to run on. I think that the next development push will be for DX12 and 4K support, which will use the kind of raw power the i7 has. Systems are getting more GPU limited, that is where all the 'heat and light' will be fore the next few years.

I would expect five or more years from the CPU/Motherboard, and you will want to upgrade or replace your GPU once or twice. The LGA 2011-v3 will be around, but not for gaming systems, unless new Skylake processors are made to fit that socket, which I do not expect.

Save your money and put it aside for your GPU upgrade in two to three years time.
 
Is this a gaming machine or are you doing rendering or editing? The i7 5820K is not worth it for gaming only, at the moment.

If you go with an i7 4790, 'big air' will cool it well and quieter, even overclocked.

You could use a cheaper motherboard, unless the Maximus VII Hero has a feature they you particularly need.
 

Ninjafoof

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I mostly use the computer for gaming, office work, and some music creation and editing, as well as some video compression. While I'm not home, let other sites and services tap into my processing power for s'&'gs.

As for the Maximus mobo, honestly I like the looks and, from what I've read, its easy to overclock with.
 
OK. There's nothing that you have said that tells me you 'need' a 5820K (unless you can make more money selling time on it for others to use)

The i7 4790K is more than enough. Good' big air' cooling will be enough, something like the Noctua NH D15 or similar. Check the reviews for 'big liquid' and see which meets your needs, the H100i, the NZXT Kraken 61, or the Cooler Master Nepton. (I'd spend a little more and go with the Swiftech H-220X for its excellent pump and block, and flexibility)

If you like the Maximus VII Hero, go for it, it is a good board with good power phases for overclocking.

You PSU will support a later SLI. Go for it, although I would probably look at upgrading first, if it were necessary.

If you can move your old stuff on, I would consider upgrading to 2400Mhz Mushin Redline, or G.Skill TridentX memory. When run at 2400Mhz, you will notice the 10% difference is applications where it matters.
 

Ninjafoof

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I appreciate your feedback. I'm currently running G.Skill Sniper series at 2133mhz. My one question with "big air cooling" is space: on my current set up, with 4 sticks of DDR3, my 212 BARELY fits; i actually had to adjust the fan slightly otherwise it was in the way of the RAM. I really like what I read about the Swiftech H-220X, so I might go with that, seems to be on par with, if not better than, the H100i.

The thing thats really hanging me up is, and I hate to use the phrase, future-proofing. Obviously, right now theres only a few games that heavily use multiple cores or threads. But that will be changing here in the near future. That being said, is the 4790k going to stand for a number of years before I have to upgrade again, especially seeing as how I have to get a new mobo anyways? In other words, will the LGA 1150 socket be used in the foreseeable future? From what I've read, the LGA 2011-v3 socket will be around for at least one more generation, if not more, making it seem like that motherboard, at least, will be the better investment in the long run.
 
A four core, four Hyperthread will last for many years. i5s are still good-to go. If a game NEEDS more than four cores/modules, it will have no market. There is almost no hardware for it to run on. I think that the next development push will be for DX12 and 4K support, which will use the kind of raw power the i7 has. Systems are getting more GPU limited, that is where all the 'heat and light' will be fore the next few years.

I would expect five or more years from the CPU/Motherboard, and you will want to upgrade or replace your GPU once or twice. The LGA 2011-v3 will be around, but not for gaming systems, unless new Skylake processors are made to fit that socket, which I do not expect.

Save your money and put it aside for your GPU upgrade in two to three years time.
 

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