Question Losing the battle against my overheating Ryzen 7 5800x

benjito

Commendable
Jan 19, 2019
7
0
1,510
0
Hey All,

Since building my new PC back in January I've been struggling to get the CPU, a Ryzen 7 5800x, to stop running at blazing temps and I'm just about out of ideas now and wondering if I just need to upgrade my CPU cooler (NZXT X53).
It idles at around 58-60 degrees. Opening a web browser or other light usage can see it shooting off to 70+. Games have it in mid-high 80's, occasionally hitting 91 or 92.
Things I have done so far:
Keen to hear any other ideas.

Many thanks!

Rest of PC: Case: NZXT H510. Mobo: Gigabyte Aorus X570 Elite. GPU: EVGA RTX 3080. RAM: 32gb (2x16) Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 3200Mhz. PSU: Corsair RM750x.
 

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
The quirk with the 5800X is under the hood(IHS), something you can't do anything about, without screwing with its performance.
The 5600X, 5900X, and 5950X, all boost like the 5800X, but they don't run quite as hot while doing so. It's just the 5800X that's the odd man out.

Upgraded the thermal paste to Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut.
Doesn't work well with any of the Ryzen 5000 cpus, except for the 5600X(maybe).
That's due to Kryonaut's 80C temperature ceiling; it burns out faster around temperatures like that.
The turbo boost algorithm is very aggressive on these cpus; even at 85C, they're still seeking higher boost bins before temperatures are a concern(to them). That's how they were designed.

Games have it in mid-high 80's, occasionally hitting 91 or 92.
That's happening because of THIS:
EVGA RTX 3080 + NZXT H510
Once the 3080 gets rolling, the system can't get cool air in fast enough, nor get the heat out fast enough.
 

benjito

Commendable
Jan 19, 2019
7
0
1,510
0
Did you try it with the stock cooler to see if the cooler is the problem? 70+ is fine for a 5800x but anywhere above 80 with your x53 is a problem.
The CPU didn't come with a stock cooler. I have a Cooler Master Hyper 212 lying around somewhere that I could try, it used to keep my i7 7700k very cool. Just a pain to do when this cooler should be up to the job.
 

benjito

Commendable
Jan 19, 2019
7
0
1,510
0
The quirk with the 5800X is under the hood(IHS), something you can't do anything about, without screwing with its performance.
The 5600X, 5900X, and 5950X, all boost like the 5800X, but they don't run quite as hot while doing so. It's just the 5800X that's the odd man out.


Doesn't work well with any of the Ryzen 5000 cpus, except for the 5600X(maybe).
That's due to Kryonaut's 80C temperature ceiling; it burns out faster around temperatures like that.
The turbo boost algorithm is very aggressive on these cpus; even at 85C, they're still seeking higher boost bins before temperatures are a concern(to them). That's how they were designed.


That's happening because of THIS:
EVGA RTX 3080 + NZXT H510
Once the 3080 gets rolling, the system can't get cool air in fast enough, nor get the heat out fast enough.
Thanks for the info. Is there a particular paste you'd recommend? I have some Arctic Mx-4 here somewhere, would that do better?
I did only install the 3080 yesterday, was using a 2070 super before that, still had very similar temps. Have been considering getting a case with better cooling.
 
Hey All,

Since building my new PC back in January I've been struggling to get the CPU, a Ryzen 7 5800x, to stop running at blazing temps and I'm just about out of ideas now and wondering if I just need to upgrade my CPU cooler (NZXT X53).
It idles at around 58-60 degrees. Opening a web browser or other light usage can see it shooting off to 70+. Games have it in mid-high 80's, occasionally hitting 91 or 92.
Things I have done so far:
Keen to hear any other ideas.

Many thanks!

Rest of PC: Case: NZXT H510. Mobo: Gigabyte Aorus X570 Elite. GPU: EVGA RTX 3080. RAM: 32gb (2x16) Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 3200Mhz. PSU: Corsair RM750x.
Might be the best thing is to adjust your ideas of what's normal temps for Ryzen CPU's...


So, Robert Halleck is AMD tech marketing guru and is the voice of AMD. He's saying that it's designed to boost up to 90C and that it's perfectly OK to do so in order for the CPU to operate at full potential. It only starts pulling back on it's serious boosting when it hits the temp limit.

That said, sure, it's great to cool it as well as you can because that keeps it boosting better, longer, before it pulls back to limit the temps. It's exactly like a smart overclocker does: run the highest clock to get the highest temp that's safe. Except in this case it's highly dynamic because the algorithm does it on the fly, and the silicon is designed for a temp limit of 90C. But the way Ryzen works, especially Ryzen 5000, it's probably unrealistic to expect to absolutely never get to around 90C every now and then. If it doesn't then you're just leaving performance on the table so tweak the PBO parameters a little more.
 
Last edited:

benjito

Commendable
Jan 19, 2019
7
0
1,510
0
Might be the best thing is to adjust your ideas of what's normal temps for Ryzen CPU's...


So, Robert Halleck is AMD tech marketing guru and is the voice of AMD. He's saying that it's designed to boost up to 90C and that it's perfectly OK to do so in order for the CPU to operate at full potential. It only starts pulling back on it's serious boosting when it hits the temp limit.

That said, sure, it's great to cool it as well as you can because that keeps it boosting better, longer, before it pulls back to limit the temps. It's exactly like a smart overclocker does: run the highest clock to get the highest temp that's safe. Except in this case it's highly dynamic because the algorithm does it on the fly, and the silicon is designed for a temp limit of 90C. But the way Ryzen works, especially Ryzen 5000, it's probably unrealistic to expect to absolutely never get to around 90C every now and then. If it doesn't then you're just leaving performance on the table so tweak the PBO parameters a little more.

Interesting. That's helpful, thanks.
 

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