Question Low Cinebench R23 scores on 10 minutes(test throttling) but good score on Off

May 15, 2022
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I recently updated my PC to Ryzen 5900X. I tried to benchmark it and found cinebench scores are low. Initially i only tried 10 mins which gave me a score of 17851 for multi core, which seemed really low for 5900X where most scores are around 22000. But when i turn the minimum test duration to Off the score is 21026.
Configuration:
Ryzen 9 5900X
Aorus 3060 ti Elite
16gb*2 Corsair RGB Pro 3600Mhz
B450 Steel Legend ATX motherboard
Deepcool Gammax L240 ARGB Liquid Cooler

Is it the cooler causing issue when kept running for a long time? Ambient temp is 30 degrees. On HW monitor max cpu temp even peaked 90 on CCD #0 . Idle temp is around 50 degrees. Using Noctua NT H1 thermal paste. I have so much questions given i installed the CPU and all. Thank you in advance
 
I recently updated my PC to Ryzen 5900X. I tried to benchmark it and found cinebench scores are low. Initially i only tried 10 mins which gave me a score of 17851 for multi core, which seemed really low for 5900X where most scores are around 22000. But when i turn the minimum test duration to Off the score is 21026.
Configuration:
Ryzen 9 5900X
Aorus 3060 ti Elite
16gb*2 Corsair RGB Pro 3600Mhz
B450 Steel Legend ATX motherboard
Deepcool Gammax L240 ARGB Liquid Cooler

Is it the cooler causing issue when kept running for a long time? Ambient temp is 30 degrees. On HW monitor max cpu temp even peaked 90 on CCD #0 . Idle temp is around 50 degrees. Using Noctua NT H1 thermal paste. I have so much questions given i installed the CPU and all. Thank you in advance
90c is right when it stats thermal throttle. 240 AIO may be tad too little.
 

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
My case is gigabyte c200. Could airflow be an issue?
Yes.
AIOs can be airflow choked more easily than air coolers; placement and chassis design are important.
They have a longer time to soak, but also take longer to cool down, Vs air coolers.
With poor airflow, you can end up at the following: the heat in the loop continues to rise, because the fans at the radiator can't move/remove it fast enough due to heavy interference.


Is it possible i didn't fit it properly enough?
I have doubts because of that:
Initially i only tried 10 mins which gave me a score of 17851 for multi core, which seemed really low for 5900X where most scores are around 22000. But when i turn the minimum test duration to Off the score is 21026.

The single lap was short enough that the heat didn't have time to build up. The 10 minute run, on the other hand, was plenty.
5900X also doesn't pull that much power - a 240mm AIO should be able to handle it just fine.
 
May 15, 2022
21
0
10
0
Yes.
AIOs can be airflow choked more easily than air coolers; placement and chassis design are important.
They have a longer time to soak, but also take longer to cool down, Vs air coolers.
With poor airflow, you can end up at the following: the heat in the loop continues to rise, because the fans at the radiator can't move/remove it fast enough due to heavy interference.



I have doubts because of that:
Initially i only tried 10 mins which gave me a score of 17851 for multi core, which seemed really low for 5900X where most scores are around 22000. But when i turn the minimum test duration to Off the score is 21026.

The single lap was short enough that the heat didn't have time to build up. The 10 minute run, on the other hand, was plenty.
5900X also doesn't pull that much power - a 240mm AIO should be able to handle it just fine.
Radiator is top mounted. I wish the case front is mesh instead of glass. I have mounted 2 intake fan on front and 1 exhaust on back of the case.

What could be my best solution? Bring ambient temp down by installing AC? Or a better AIO? or curve optimisation? Or new case? If i add more thermal paste and reseat the cooler once again, will it help?
Thank you
 

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
Radiator is top mounted. I wish the case front is mesh instead of glass. I have mounted 2 intake fan on front and 1 exhaust on back of the case.
Set up like that, you have very little fresh air getting to the AIO.
The top negative review of this chassis off of Amazon:
"Decent case for the money, has all the modern features you could want. The mildly infuriating thing about it though is the atrocious front panel design, the cool aesthetic solid glass panel is bad enough for airflow as it is, but then the absolute dunce of a designer decides to not only needlessly obstruct the vents' airflow by putting the holes in a stupid aesthetic pattern instead of designing them for efficiency, but uses an asymmetric pattern that increasingly obstructs the airflow from top to bottom, choking off another two thirds of the already hindered airflow for no bloody reason.

If you're like me, and you like the look of the case, but you don't want to suffocate and overheat your system because the front panel airflow was designed on bringing your kid to work day, all you gotta do is take a dremel with a cutting wheel, and go up and down each vent slot carving out the idiotic pattern of obstruction, allowing the vents to actually bloody vent."

Normal Vents:
===========

Gigabyte's Attempt:
= - = - = -


What could be my best solution? Bring ambient temp down by installing AC? Or a better AIO? or curve optimisation? Or new case? If i add more thermal paste and reseat the cooler once again, will it help?
1)Without spending a dime:
-Remove the rear fan - a source of cool air for the AIO right there. No to rear intake fan; it'll just serve to 'T-bone' the pull from the AIO's fans, so leave the space empty.
-Remove the 2 front fans, if you don't wish to do what the person in the above review did. If not, the fans will do more to RECIRCULATE some of the already warmed air inside the chassis than actually bring air in.
-Remove the PCIe slot guards at the rear, and the gpu fans will be able to bring in more air from that way.
Like this, you will have rear intake, top exhaust... a mirror of the usual front intake, top exhaust, which isn't working due to the lousy front panel design.

Spending some money: A different chassis. Don't know what's available to you, but try to pick something that's a bit more porous than what's in use now.
OR the above dremel idea...

2)No. I have a hard time seeing AC being effective when the current problem is getting enough air inside the PC when there's work in progress...

3)Also no.
There really isn't that much separating what is a good AIO. The biggest factor is the fans, which vary in specs, and people add even more variance to that.
AIOs need air too: by choking the fans, the user makes it harder for the heat to be removed from the coolant. You can then have a situation where the coolant temperature builds up faster than the fans can cool it down.
The coolant alone can't cool the hardware, when all it's doing is moving in a loop inside the PC. Several different 240mm AIOs would suffer in the C200.

4)Negative.

5)Yes, if you don't wish to try the things in the response to question 1.

6)No, sorry.
 
Reactions: anandhu2
May 15, 2022
21
0
10
0
Set up like that, you have very little fresh air getting to the AIO.
The top negative review of this chassis off of Amazon:
"Decent case for the money, has all the modern features you could want. The mildly infuriating thing about it though is the atrocious front panel design, the cool aesthetic solid glass panel is bad enough for airflow as it is, but then the absolute dunce of a designer decides to not only needlessly obstruct the vents' airflow by putting the holes in a stupid aesthetic pattern instead of designing them for efficiency, but uses an asymmetric pattern that increasingly obstructs the airflow from top to bottom, choking off another two thirds of the already hindered airflow for no bloody reason.

If you're like me, and you like the look of the case, but you don't want to suffocate and overheat your system because the front panel airflow was designed on bringing your kid to work day, all you gotta do is take a dremel with a cutting wheel, and go up and down each vent slot carving out the idiotic pattern of obstruction, allowing the vents to actually bloody vent."

Normal Vents:
===========

Gigabyte's Attempt:
= - = - = -



1)Without spending a dime:
-Remove the rear fan - a source of cool air for the AIO right there. No to rear intake fan; it'll just serve to 'T-bone' the pull from the AIO's fans, so leave the space empty.
-Remove the 2 front fans, if you don't wish to do what the person in the above review did. If not, the fans will do more to RECIRCULATE some of the already warmed air inside the chassis than actually bring air in.
-Remove the PCIe slot guards at the rear, and the gpu fans will be able to bring in more air from that way.
Like this, you will have rear intake, top exhaust... a mirror of the usual front intake, top exhaust, which isn't working due to the lousy front panel design.

Spending some money: A different chassis. Don't know what's available to you, but try to pick something that's a bit more porous than what's in use now.
OR the above dremel idea...

2)No. I have a hard time seeing AC being effective when the current problem is getting enough air inside the PC when there's work in progress...

3)Also no.
There really isn't that much separating what is a good AIO. The biggest factor is the fans, which vary in specs, and people add even more variance to that.
AIOs need air too: by choking the fans, the user makes it harder for the heat to be removed from the coolant. You can then have a situation where the coolant temperature builds up faster than the fans can cool it down.
The coolant alone can't cool the hardware, when all it's doing is moving in a loop inside the PC. Several different 240mm AIOs would suffer in the C200.

4)Negative.

5)Yes, if you don't wish to try the things in the response to question 1.

6)No, sorry.
I tried with side glass panel off and got a score of 19841 for 10 mins. It did improve. But i could really see the score getting lower and lower with time. I also monitored temperature which capped max at
80.9 degree in Package, 83.3 degree on CCD#0, 81 CCD#0, 80.5 Cores(max)

After that tried one cycle and got 20681 pts
 

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