Question Low profile GPU on SFF compatibility check

liranjp

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Mar 21, 2020
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Hi guys,

I have HP Pro desk G2 SFF and I want to add a GPU for this FSS, I thought about:
Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1050 Ti OC 4G GV-N105TOC-4GD
Now I am not sure if it's going to work on my SFF.

the GPU is DDR 5 but I don't which GDRR is supported by my HP Pro desk G2 SFF
Also not sure if I have PCI or PCI-E
And not sure if this specific GPU needs additional power supply from the PSU or not because my PSU doesn't have free 6pins cables.

Please help me :)
 

Eximo

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HP Prodesk G2 600 Small Form Factor certainly has PCIe slots.

GPUs memory has no bearing on compatibility with any given system, connection type and power are the main things. (Some really new cards don't get along with very old systems)

No that card won't fit, it is a full height card. Small Form Factor generally requires a Half Height card.

I do not recommend buying this since it is extremely overpriced:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/Hnhj4D/msi-geforce-gtx-1050-ti-4gb-video-card-gtx-1050-ti-4gt-lp



GT1030, still overpriced, but not nearly as bad. They normally retail for about $90


Fan: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/nRmxFT/gigabyte-geforce-gt-1030-2gb-low-profile-video-card-gv-n1030d5-2gl

No Fan: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/KmM323/msi-geforce-gt-1030-2gb-2gh-lp-oc-video-card-gt-1030-2gh-lp-oc

Avoid the DDR4 based GT1030, they are about half as fast and cost almost the same.
 

Eximo

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Keep in mind airflow and power are not great in such systems. A GTX card is probably technically okay, but will overheat and throttle in the cramped conditions.

Also nearly doubles your power consumption, which will make the power supply run hotter.
 

liranjp

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Mar 21, 2020
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510
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HP Prodesk G2 600 Small Form Factor certainly has PCIe slots.

GPUs memory has no bearing on compatibility with any given system, connection type and power are the main things. (Some really new cards don't get along with very old systems)

No that card won't fit, it is a full height card. Small Form Factor generally requires a Half Height card.

I do not recommend buying this since it is extremely overpriced:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/Hnhj4D/msi-geforce-gtx-1050-ti-4gb-video-card-gtx-1050-ti-4gt-lp



GT1030, still overpriced, but not nearly as bad. They normally retail for about $90


Fan: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/nRmxFT/gigabyte-geforce-gt-1030-2gb-low-profile-video-card-gv-n1030d5-2gl

No Fan: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/KmM323/msi-geforce-gt-1030-2gb-2gh-lp-oc-video-card-gt-1030-2gh-lp-oc

Avoid the DDR4 based GT1030, they are about half as fast and cost almost the same.
There's also a low profile for this card : https://www.gigabyte.com/Graphics-Card/GV-N105TOC-4GL#kf
I just see there that there is a recommendation for PSU with 300 watt, what's the power supply on the prod desk g2?
 

liranjp

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Mar 21, 2020
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Keep in mind airflow and power are not great in such systems. A GTX card is probably technically okay, but will overheat and throttle in the cramped conditions.

Also nearly doubles your power consumption, which will make the power supply run hotter.
What if I add some fans to the case?
Is really PSU of 300 watt is a must?
 

Eximo

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300W is them covering themselves. They don't know what is in the rest of your system. so they err on the high side.

75W is the max a GPU can pull from the PCIe slot only.

Most models of that computer I looked at listed a 240W power supply. Your CPU is likely 65W maximum. Motherboard, memory, fans, hard drive, all together are probably another 50W maximum. That puts you at around 200W total. Now, 80% of a PSU is technically fine, but as the temperature increases the lifespan of the power supply is reduced.

Most small form factor cases do not have room for fans. You might be able to get something like a half height expansion slot fan, or replace the existing intake/exhaust fan with one of higher quality (not always easy in OEM systems, they like to use proprietary fans)
 

liranjp

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Mar 21, 2020
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300W is them covering themselves. They don't know what is in the rest of your system. so they err on the high side.

75W is the max a GPU can pull from the PCIe slot only.

Most models of that computer I looked at listed a 240W power supply. Your CPU is likely 65W maximum. Motherboard, memory, fans, hard drive, all together are probably another 50W maximum. That puts you at around 200W total. Now, 80% of a PSU is technically fine, but as the temperature increases the lifespan of the power supply is reduced.

Most small form factor cases do not have room for fans. You might be able to get something like a half height expansion slot fan, or replace the existing intake/exhaust fan with one of higher quality (not always easy in OEM systems, they like to use proprietary fans)
Does those GPUs that don't need extra power from the PSU are less good than GPU with the 6 pin PSU powered?
Is this GPU even good for the games now days? Like warzone ?
I am a little bit worried buying this GPU to this PC with all the risk around with PSU, heat... Would it better buy another PC just for gaming?
 

Eximo

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Well, GPUs vary in power/performance as you get newer cards. In general, yes, cards that require more power are generally more powerful within the same rough generation.

1050Ti would be an entry level gaming card today. It was supplanted by the GTX1650 and GTX1650 Super, which hasn't really been replaced yet, but there is an RTX3050 coming to market soon. AMD has their RX5500 out there as well, with a coming soon on the RX6600.

GPU prices for more mid-range cards (which in today's environment could really be called high end) like the RTX3060 or RX6700XT start at $400-500 or more at retail, and many are available for grossly inflated prices.

About the only way to get a decent GPU right now is through an OEM retailer. Current best choice is the HP Omen lineup (with a water cooler). They don't do anything too terrible. Other OEMs are known for poor heatsinks, single channel memory (despite what they advertise), proprietary motherboards and power supplies (like your SFF system there) and poor quality OEM supplied graphics cards (bad heatsinks usually)

All depends on what you have to spend. You can pick up a fairly powerful gaming laptop for under $700, and get a decently powerful desktop for around $1000, sometimes less.

Buying today, Intel 10th generation i5 and i7 or AMD Ryzen 5000 series would be the choices to get. RTX3060 (you should be able to get RTX3050 in laptops already)
 

liranjp

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Mar 21, 2020
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300W is them covering themselves. They don't know what is in the rest of your system. so they err on the high side.

75W is the max a GPU can pull from the PCIe slot only.

Most models of that computer I looked at listed a 240W power supply. Your CPU is likely 65W maximum. Motherboard, memory, fans, hard drive, all together are probably another 50W maximum. That puts you at around 200W total. Now, 80% of a PSU is technically fine, but as the temperature increases the lifespan of the power supply is reduced.

Most small form factor cases do not have room for fans. You might be able to get something like a half height expansion slot fan, or replace the existing intake/exhaust fan with one of higher quality (not always easy in OEM systems, they like to use proprietary fans)
I checked my PSU and it is labeled with Max Wat 200.
Is it risky to buy the 1050 TI Low-Profile, no external power supply needed (6 pins).


Can you elaborate on the possible outcomes? Can my pc fry?

Another idea I had is to replace the PSU with a 500W PSU I got from my other desktop. What do you think about it? Will the motherboard support 500W?

Thanks for all the help so far.
 

Eximo

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Yes, you are likely to experience shutdowns and potentially the PSU could die. Certainly running it at maximum will shorten its life as it runs hot, may also be quite loud doing it.

SFF power supplies are generally proprietary, a standard ATX supply would be to large. The system may support Flex ATX, but likely is completely custom. There are other compatible models from HP that offer a little more power like the 240W I mentioned, but probably not worth the effort.

A GT1030 would be the safer option.

Or you just sell this system for whatever you can get and pick up a cheap OEM gaming desktop. HP Omen is considered the best choice at the moment, they use off the shelf components in their mid-tower offerings.
 

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