Question Lubricating keyboard switches with Chinese lubricants?

Ralston18

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Not something I would do.

This keyboard?

https://www.amazon.com/Razer-Cynosa-Lite-Gaming-Keyboard/dp/B087C98QJJ

All you should need to do is to follow the keyboard manufacturer's instructions with respect to keyboard cleaning and maintenance.

My thought is that the lubricants will eventually get gummy via dust and debris.

And then the keys start sticking - even worse. No way to really know what the lubricate product is made from.....
 

Boris_yo

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Generally speaking, those greases are used to lubricate mechanical keyboards with metal parts.

If your keyboard doesn't have metal parts but plastic and rubber, you don't need it.
Mine has metallic stabilizers underneath larger keys that creak and are harder to press.
At least will apply silicone grease on them to prevent that.
I read that special lubricants for mechanical switches make them smoother and quieter which is what I wanted too on membrane switches...
 

Boris_yo

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All you should need to do is to follow the keyboard manufacturer's instructions with respect to keyboard cleaning and maintenance.

My thought is that the lubricants will eventually get gummy via dust and debris.

And then the keys start sticking - even worse. No way to really know what the lubricate product is made from.....
I don't remember receiving manual for this keyboard.
Even the least viscous oils attract dust and debris? If so I wonder why users do it on mechanical switches.
 

Boris_yo

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Users doing it on mechanical switches properly are disassembling the switch and properly lubing it internally. Dust and debris is a far smaller issue internally.
I saw how user did it on membrane keyboard. He did not disassemble switch and just applied a small amount of some grease on keycap's stem...
 

Boris_yo

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That's the keycap not the switch you are lubricating, it may help to smooth out the action a bit sure.
Will it make keycaps quieter too? Others found the idea not worth time effort to lubricate keycaps stems and advised me to buy mechanical keyboard instead.

But if I am going to disassemble keycaps to lube stabilizers I thought why not lube keycaps stems as well if I am at it.
 

hang-the-9

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Will it make keycaps quieter too? Others found the idea not worth time effort to lubricate keycaps stems and advised me to buy mechanical keyboard instead.

But if I am going to disassemble keycaps to lube stabilizers I thought why not lube keycaps stems as well if I am at it.
No idea if it will, I have not tried messing around with membrane keyboards. Try it and see, the lubricant is like $3 to buy. You don't need to disassemble the keycaps, they just pop off. It's the PCB you are likely going to need to remove to get to the stabs.
 

Boris_yo

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No idea if it will, I have not tried messing around with membrane keyboards. Try it and see, the lubricant is like $3 to buy. You don't need to disassemble the keycaps, they just pop off. It's the PCB you are likely going to need to remove to get to the stabs.
What kind of lubricant? Silicone based does not go well with silicone sheet. Teflon based is suitable but the closes I found was Krytox-like oil for $10 on AE which is probably watered down version...
 

hang-the-9

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What kind of lubricant? Silicone based does not go well with silicone sheet. Teflon based is suitable but the closes I found was Krytox-like oil for $10 on AE which is probably watered down version...
I used dielectric grease, which is silicone based, also bike chain lubricant works pretty well just to smooth things out, just because I had some and wanted to play around with seeing what else it could be used for https://www.amazon.com/Finish-Line-Bicycle-Chain-Teflon/dp/B000C17HKS/ref=sxin_15_ac_d_rm?ac_md=1-1-YmlrZSBjaGFpbiBsdWJl-ac_d_rm_rm_rm&crid=2VIUJZC543UNL&cv_ct_cx=bike+chain+lubricant&keywords=bike+chain+lubricant&pd_rd_i=B002IDZXRM&pd_rd_r=8d26fa4e-0eca-423d-933d-0f2dc17896be&pd_rd_w=VQKBf&pd_rd_wg=VXDCt&pf_rd_p=1dcacca2-86c1-44b6-b509-8cf93960a908&pf_rd_r=7CP0793XXMBBW2SEXK46&qid=1645052256&sprefix=bike+chain+lu,aps,76&sr=1-1-12d4272d-8adb-4121-8624-135149aa9081&th=1

It's not for the actual dome or the keyboard surface but looks like just to make the keycaps slide smoother.
 
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Boris_yo

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I used dielectric grease, which is silicone based, also bike chain lubricant works pretty well just to smooth things out, just because I had some and wanted to play around with seeing what else it could be used for.

It's not for the actual dome or the keyboard surface but looks like just to make the keycaps slide smoother.
This is what I want to accomplish but since keycaps stems come in contact with silicone rubber domes, it is where silicone based lubricant can do no good over long-term (swelling, cracking). That bike chain lubricant is just what I would buy since it has PTFE derivative and repels dust and grime. Would cost more to ship to my country though.
 

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