Question m.2 RAID 0 on Z390 chipset?

May 12, 2019
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Hi,
I own an i9-9900K and a z390 aorus master with 2 samsung 970 evo plus drives of 500Gb each.

It is known that RAID 0 increases speeds, but due to PCI-e limited lanes of the z390 chipset, a raid 0 cannot be achieved (as far as I know). I saw on the internet some PCI-e cards x8 that can support 2 Nvme drives with RAID 0, is that possible in my scenario? Could I then benefit from full RAID 0 speeds?

(I only have 1 PCI-e slot occupied. With a GPU)

Thanks you very much.
 
There are scenarios, especially in benchmarks, where blistering numbers such as 5000-6000+ MB/sec reads can indeed be achieved/displayed. Anything limited be storage speed might indeed show improvements.

Certainly, most are not going to be able to tell the difference, and, if using a RAID 0 for your OS, your system is always one small glitch away from being rendered unbootable...

You can always go that route if you already have a pair of them, and see if you are happy with them, which is what matters.

It's not as if a single 970EVO Plus is likely to ever seem slow, anyway, just yet..
 
May 12, 2019
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Thank you very much for your response. But the problem is that people are saying that due to the PCI-e limited lanes, no more than 3800Mb/s can be achieved even with a RAID setup. My question was if a 500Mb/s or 4000Mb/s can be achieved using a PCI-e 2x Nvme card.

anyway, thank you for your answer.
 

popatim

Titan
Moderator
I believe the 3800 limitation is the PCH to CPU max bandwidth. So 1 m2 on the CPU and one on the PCH leaves you stuck since it will only work at the speed of the slowest one. Even if both are put on the PCH, when the CPU needs data, you hit the limit again even though the drives now can do much more.
 

Littlelio

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Jul 10, 2012
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Not trying to hijack the topic, but ... just one thing: after the raid0 is ready, make sure resetting BIOS/upgrading BIOS will not lose the RAID information, or your will be disaster... I just came back from such experience.

Twice.
 

Littlelio

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I would wager for about 99% of consumers who are interested in RAID 0, RAID 0 would be a terrible idea at worst, pointless expense at best.
I agree. But there is history with it. The invention of RAID0 is to reach fast read/write speed many years back, when the hardware/bandwidth was very limiting. Ppeople have to run the risk of losing everything to get those. Today, a single piece of SSD can get crazy I/O performance, so RAID0 sounds silly.

Of course, double the current high-speed SSD via RAID0 is another story. Eventually the hardware performance may get saturated, against the real application.

(or will it?)
 

DSzymborski

Glorious
Moderator
I agree. But there is history with it. The invention of RAID0 is to reach fast read/write speed many years back, when the hardware/bandwidth was very limiting. Ppeople have to run the risk of losing everything to get those. Today, a single piece of SSD can get crazy I/O performance, so RAID0 sounds silly.

Of course, double the current high-speed SSD via RAID0 is another story. Eventually the hardware performance may get saturated, against the real application.

(or will it?)
Of course they're important historically. I'm 41 and RAID's older than I am. Just not much of a point in most cases to use one in 2019.

Trust me, we get a lot of queries around here from people who are trying to recover data from a pointless RAID setup. Best to discourage needless use rather than wait for disaster, in my opinion.
 

USAFRet

Titan
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Mar 16, 2013
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Of course, double the current high-speed SSD via RAID0 is another story. Eventually the hardware performance may get saturated, against the real application.

(or will it?)
In some limited high performance realms, it might be a good idea.
A movie production house, where you are writing 5TB at a time from the RAID 0 on your workstation to the RAID 0 on the shared render farm, via a 10Gbe LAN.

To speed up the level loading for Battlefield? No.
Any non-RAID SSD is just fine.
 

Littlelio

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Of course they're important historically. I'm 41 and RAID's older than I am. Just not much of a point in most cases to use one in 2019.

Trust me, we get a lot of queries around here from people who are trying to recover data from a pointless RAID setup. Best to discourage needless use rather than wait for disaster, in my opinion.
From another point of view... PANIC SELLS . People will pay without too much consideration to save their (maybe pointless data) :p too bad I am not in such industry

I think professionals should know what they are doing. Others? maybe just for fun... for those professionals doing stupid thing, well they will learn :sneaky:
 

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