[SOLVED] Massive CPU throttling, Pleb needs help choosing new CPU for 2560px1440p gaming with 2080rtx

Sep 28, 2019
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There's way too much information out there for me to sort through properly with all the new releases along with most of the guides I trust lagging far behind(not their fault, just overwhelmed with new releases.)

I've been noticing the CPU throttling for awhile now on my current build:

  • Mobo: Thimphu-K z170 GPU: 2080 RTX MSI Ventus 8g Ram: Corsair Vengeance LPX 2 x 8 GB DDR4-2133 Cas13 Memory: Samsung 970 Evo NVME 500GB/ 860 Evo 250GB PSU: Seasonic Prime Ultra 750 Gold 750W/80+
  • Due to the Frankenbuild nature of my current build I'll be upgrading the motherboard as well along with the new ram I've purchased.
So the question is really, what processor is going to give me the full-potential of my 2080 RTX on my 2560x1440 165hz Monitor?

I'm not sold on the memory latency involved with the Ryzen 7 3700x or the Ryzen 7 3900x but I'm open to it.

Also I'm confused with all the similar names on the current 9th gen release of Intel and figuring out which ones won't overheat, aka everything under the I9s because I don't quite need that much power or the power of the Extreme chips with extra hyperthreading.


Feel free to correct me if my assumptions or thoughts are wrong. I feel super overwhelmed at all of it.
 

PC Tailor

Distinguished
Herald
Welcome to the forums my friend!

I would take a step back. Firstly I wouldn't worry about that kind of comparitive benchmark, it's not exactly comparing apples to apples, I see far too many people spend a LOT of money and get wound up in a rabbit hole over those benchmarks when there was nothing wrong.

However I will say, I can see from that, that your CPU isn't boosting correctly, so I would first look at:
  • Drivers
  • BIOS update and settings
  • CPU and GPU temperatures.
  • Windows power settings.
Typically high temperatures can limit your turbo capability.
 

PC Tailor

Distinguished
Herald
Welcome to the forums my friend!

I would take a step back. Firstly I wouldn't worry about that kind of comparitive benchmark, it's not exactly comparing apples to apples, I see far too many people spend a LOT of money and get wound up in a rabbit hole over those benchmarks when there was nothing wrong.

However I will say, I can see from that, that your CPU isn't boosting correctly, so I would first look at:
  • Drivers
  • BIOS update and settings
  • CPU and GPU temperatures.
  • Windows power settings.
Typically high temperatures can limit your turbo capability.
 
I agree with PC Tailor as the 7700 is still a fairly good gaming CPU and I would double check the points he has raised. Saying that an upgrade to a more powerful CPU will get more out of the mighty RTX 2080. You have two routes if you want to go the upgrade route.

1 - Intel in the 9700K or 9900K which will give you the very best FPS possible and get the best out of the RTX 2080 though this will be a more costly solution. Matched to DDR4 3200 or 3600 it will provide about as good a gaming experience as you could want especially to hit the 165Hz/FPS.

Example Intel i7-9700K build

PCPartPicker Part List: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/ss9yTB

CPU: Intel Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($359.99 @ Best Buy)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master MasterLiquid ML240L RGB 66.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($58.89 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: Gigabyte Z390 AORUS PRO WIFI ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($199.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($82.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $701.86
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-28 06:13 EDT-0400

2 - Ryzen in the 3600 (very cost effective) or the 3700 again matched to some decent RAM like DDR4 3600 on a X570 motherboard, again will provide a very good gaming experience .

Example Ryzen build - Could not find the 3700 but here is the cost with the 3700X....You can save even more going the 3600 route.

PCPartPicker Part List: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/tsxpjy

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($328.90 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: ASRock X570 Phantom Gaming 4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($148.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory ($83.98 @ Newegg Business)
Total: $561.87
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-28 06:10 EDT-0400
 
Sep 28, 2019
5
0
10
0
Welcome to the forums my friend!

I would take a step back. Firstly I wouldn't worry about that kind of comparitive benchmark, it's not exactly comparing apples to apples, I see far too many people spend a LOT of money and get wound up in a rabbit hole over those benchmarks when there was nothing wrong.

However I will say, I can see from that, that your CPU isn't boosting correctly, so I would first look at:
  • Drivers
  • BIOS update and settings
  • CPU and GPU temperatures.
  • Windows power settings.
Typically high temperatures can limit your turbo capability.
First of all, thank you so much, secondly great catch, I'll sort through the limited Uefi options this horrible HP mobo offers to try and fix the boost issues and report back if there's any change.

The bios is up to date currently although the last release was in June, and I've set the windows power options to what everyone seems to agree are the optimal settings on Win 10 1903.

Temps seem to stay very low and never go above 68-70 degrees C for my CPU and my GPU under heavy load.

Driver-wise Intel could be an issue whether it's bloatware or slightly behind at this point. HP has been very slow to recommend drivers intel related(most of it is from 2017-2018). So I had to spend a lot of time finding the proper Intel ME version and chipset drivers for myself a couple months ago.

Again I appreciate the insight immensely
 

j121

Respectable
Nov 9, 2017
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if Everything runs good and get good results in games why worry about the benchmark? if the cpu is throttling its because of heat so a better cpu cooler could help.
 
Sep 28, 2019
5
0
10
0
Welcome to the forums my friend!

I would take a step back. Firstly I wouldn't worry about that kind of comparitive benchmark, it's not exactly comparing apples to apples, I see far too many people spend a LOT of money and get wound up in a rabbit hole over those benchmarks when there was nothing wrong.

However I will say, I can see from that, that your CPU isn't boosting correctly, so I would first look at:
  • Drivers
  • BIOS update and settings
  • CPU and GPU temperatures.
  • Windows power settings.
Typically high temperatures can limit your turbo capability.
Well after doing a fair bit of run around it turns out speed shift was disabled as well as hyperthreading, I had to use a few external programs to access them and reactivate them. But thanks to you my I7 is running fairly smoothly again.



Thanks again!
 
Last edited:
Sep 28, 2019
5
0
10
0
Sep 28, 2019
5
0
10
0
I agree with PC Tailor as the 7700 is still a fairly good gaming CPU and I would double check the points he has raised. Saying that an upgrade to a more powerful CPU will get more out of the mighty RTX 2080. You have two routes if you want to go the upgrade route.

1 - Intel in the 9700K or 9900K which will give you the very best FPS possible and get the best out of the RTX 2080 though this will be a more costly solution. Matched to DDR4 3200 or 3600 it will provide about as good a gaming experience as you could want especially to hit the 165Hz/FPS.

Example Intel i7-9700K build

PCPartPicker Part List: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/ss9yTB

CPU: Intel Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($359.99 @ Best Buy)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master MasterLiquid ML240L RGB 66.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($58.89 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: Gigabyte Z390 AORUS PRO WIFI ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($199.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($82.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $701.86
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-28 06:13 EDT-0400

2 - Ryzen in the 3600 (very cost effective) or the 3700 again matched to some decent RAM like DDR4 3600 on a X570 motherboard, again will provide a very good gaming experience .

Example Ryzen build - Could not find the 3700 but here is the cost with the 3700X....You can save even more going the 3600 route.

PCPartPicker Part List: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/tsxpjy

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($328.90 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: ASRock X570 Phantom Gaming 4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($148.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory ($83.98 @ Newegg Business)
Total: $561.87
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-28 06:10 EDT-0400
Thanks for the list, I probably will be updating regardless of my cpu running decently again just to future proof a little bit and to get rid of this god awful HP uefi bios lol. I'll definitely be snooping around for sales on the components you listed.
 

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