MasterCard Working On Contactless Payment Card

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DXRick

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Say you are a cashier and someone pulls out one of these cards and someone else's dead severed finger to authenticate it.

Do you say:

A: "Hold it right there while I call the police!"
B: "Thank you, and do come again."
 

bak0n

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Just another layer of security. Issue is this will have no impact for online fraud, which I'm sure is the majority of the fraud that takes place. (once you go touch-less that is).
 

everlast66

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@DXRick
"Say you are a cashier and someone pulls out one of these cards and someone else's dead severed finger to authenticate it"

No, you say: "Sir, don't forget to put the finger in a freezer to preserve it for your next purchase. Have a nice day."
 

daekar

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So I can't give my card to my wife if she left her purse in the car? You can't give a card to your child for use in emergencies? I want at least 3, preferably 4 people able to use a card. I'm all about Biometrics, but it has to be designed for real life, not some sterile lab where only one person ever uses any device or card.
 

2Be_or_Not2Be

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To all those saying "Wait, I can't give my card to ..." - you seem to be forgetting that virtually all CC companies will let you get additional cards for others. So you can get a card linked to your own account for your wife, kid, etc. Then, when they get the card, they can secure their own card with their own fingerprint.
 

USAFRet

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Maybe so. But I still do not want a card tied to my fingerprint.

When, not if, the card database gets compromised, I can get a new card.
I can't get a new finger.
 

2Be_or_Not2Be

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Well, the good part is that your fingerprint (the biometric "signature") is stored on the card. So if the card database is compromised, it doesn't compromise your account as purchases will still need to be authenticated by your biometric signature, which is only stored locally on the card.

Of course, this is all assuming that the industry will having something to prevent the online fraud part of allowing online purchases w/o the fingerprint signature.

Now, if someone gets your finger, you have much bigger problems than just worry about some fraudulent purchases.
 

daekar

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Which has nothing to do with the problem... if my wife had her purse with her or my child had a card of their own then the problem is moot. The issue is that everyone doesn't carry everything with them all the time, females don't even have functional pockets sometimes, and not all children have (or should have) their own debit card all the time. That's not even considering situations where whether or not you have you things with you is out of your control due to accident or silly security rules. I can't endorse a world where people don't have the flexibility to choose payment options that reflect the social and cooperative nature of human life.
 

iogbrideau

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The only problem is that as long as biometrics are as hackable as they are right now, I don't think they should be used as a primary needs of unlocking something. Even on iPhones they were able to unlock them with a copy of the fingerprint, or even without.
 

2Be_or_Not2Be

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You have supplied tangential questions to the direct answer I provided to the basic question of "what happens if my wife/kid needs the card that is secured by my own fingerprint?" I answered that they can get their own card.

I didn't try to answer the "should they have a card" question, because that is their own personally-considered question to answer. Nor I did I try to address the other speculative questions of "what happens if I'm not carrying the card? what happens if I don't have pockets? etc." Those are all questions the individual can address. Indeed, you can ask the same type of questions about any new payment system, such as the new(er) NFC-based ones.

This wasn't an all-encompassing answer to your personal viewpoint of the flexibility of "payment options that reflect the social and cooperative nature of human life." I simply gave a direct answer for the question "what happens if my wife/kid needs the card?"

 
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