McAfee Apologizes for Win XP Antivirus Meltdown

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Nakal

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[citation][nom]treefrog07[/nom]Gee, I wonder if the ITs will include the cost of this snafu when the McAfee subscription is up for renewal. Lost productivity, lost sales, delayed comms.......[/citation]


If he is a contracted technician, and his customers call him in to do work on their machines, then he is well within his rights to charge for his service. If you were in his shoes, I highly doubt you would just gladly give the money back after spending your time diagnosing an issue whether or not there was a problem.

How do you know when he was called, that he probably said that it wasn't an issue for them, and they demanded he come in anyway, you expect him to do it for FREE?
 

techguy911

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I think the numbers of computers affected was under estimated by a large margin i spent a few days fixing this problem with residential customers didn't get to my business customers yet.
Although i did make a lot of money fixing this i can see class action lawsuit of biblical proportions.

I know of 2 huge corporations looking for compensation because there business was down for 24-48 hrs to fix this blunder.
 

extremepcs

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We lost over 100 computers in my network. I wouldn't have minded so much if it didn't take out the friggin network... I could have fixed them all from my desk. I had to drive all over town.
 

kelemvor4

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[citation][nom]rooket[/nom]I agree, SEP is the best. And also Avira. Everything else is crap.[/citation]
+1 to that. SEP11 is about as good as it gets for AV.
 

digitalprospecter

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If their product states it is compatible with an operating system, then it does not matter if the manufacturer of said operating system no longer supports it. I am sure if a tire blows on a Deloren sportscar, the tire manufacturer can't disclaim responsibility because the Deloren car company is gone and can no longer support their product!
 

englandr753

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I work in retail and it effected all of our store locations. It was strange, it effected about 40% of the pcs at our location and was random machines. As someone else stated here, our IT guys had to drive out to every store and do a repair installation with the CD on each machine to fix. It was 3 days before those systems were up, I couldnt clock in/out and I had to use the managers ID info to run the store until it was fixed. My IT guy said they will seek compensation for damages/downtime. Why not? When Firestones tires were faulty it cost them millions and still is in the back of many consumers minds when that brand is considered.
 

englandr753

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Just maybe this will make Mcafee a better product at some point down the road with the changes they will be forced to make. I'm not so sure about that but they do deserve that much credit until proven wrong... Boy, I got soft for a minute, lol.
 

skimicro

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The update was sent to business users. Free antivirus might be enough for home users but it might not be an option for a business.
I don't know who will put their trust in a security company that allows something like this to happen.
In my company we just don't.


 

mr_tuel

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Why do IT departments insist on these bloated AV solutions? Can't they use something that is more effective and more light-weight (Nod32, Kaspersky come to mind)?
 

ceteras

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[citation][nom]mr_tuel[/nom]Why do IT departments insist on these bloated AV solutions? Can't they use something that is more effective and more light-weight (Nod32, Kaspersky come to mind)?[/citation]

Actually I've worked for a company where the decision about what security software to purchase was not done by the IT department. Of course it was McAfee and we all hated it.
 

kdashjl

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[citation][nom]mr_tuel[/nom]Why do IT departments insist on these bloated AV solutions? Can't they use something that is more effective and more light-weight (Nod32, Kaspersky come to mind)?[/citation]
NOD32 lol
+1 SEP 11
 

aletoil

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"McAfee quickly released a fix, which can be now found here."
I hope im not the only one that read "Which can be found nowhere."
 

rooket

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too bad Kaspersky turned out to be a big friggin joke. I tested it out on a machine that had virii (the online web version) and it found things so then we went ahead and purchased it and it didn't find the virii and of course didn't clean it up. So we went to SEP and Avira and it cleaned up the whole thing.

Quicker solution is to just reformat and reinstall but it's better to have an antivirus/software firewall in place first to avoid all this. I found that the firewall in SEP works pretty good and does not allow virii to spread throughout a company network.
 

antilycus

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smooooth....with Symantec and McAfee loosing ground daily, with the real time protection being a J O K E (along with system performance). This is NOT a good way to keep customers and attain new ones.
 
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