[SOLVED] Memory compatibility and upgrade for HP 250 G2 laptop/notebook

Vox

Distinguished
Aug 9, 2012
126
0
18,680
0
The laptop is the Intel Core i3 version so it has 2 memory slots,
the existing single RAM module is a SAMSUNG DDR3(L) 4GB 1Rx8 PC3L-12800S 1600MHz 1.35V, part number: M471B5173DB0-YK0.

Normally, I would not buy 2 new modules, only one to upgrade the existing one but if you say the existing one is too slow and worth to upgrade to a faster one I'll consider to get a full pair or RAM. I know it would be even faster with 2x8GB but I'll stick on the 2x4GB because of money issues.

I see there's a lot of similar part numbers, started with M471B5173 and ending with various other letter combinations, such as EB0-YK0, BH0-CK0, QHY-YK0, QH0-YK0,

and also there's an B5273 series
M471B5273DH0-CH9,
M471B5273DH0-CK0,
... and of course there are also heaps of other brands.

I would like to know the compatibility to make myself sure I don't buy something which is incompatible with my laptop or with my existing RAM module (taken I keep it).

So would you please lighten me up
  1. Should I replace the existing RAM module in order to earn considerable speed-up?
  2. If 1 is True, what pair of RAM would be sufficient?
  3. If 1 is False, what kind of RAM modules can I use on the other (free) memory bank to make it compatible to the existing module (is dual-channel a thing in laptops too?)
    • Are the other M471B5173xxx-xxx modules compatible too?
    • Are other RAM brands/series compatible too?
Thank you in advance for your help! <3
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
Laptops are PCs, so, yes. The same would apply to desktop motherboards with only two slots. Also plenty of motherboards that use SO-DIMM memory. You questioned that part of my statement so I expanded on it. Nothing more.

Laptops are more restrictive, but that is 100% software. Up to the OEM what capabilities they gave to the end user.

If you are asking me to review all those models, that is something you can easily do with the part numbers. No links up there.

Go to the manufacturer's websites, get the spec sheet for each and compare. Just for starters:

M471B5273DH0-CH9 = 1333Mhz rather than 1600Mhz
M471B5273DH0-CK0 = DDR3 at 1.5 volts, not 1.35v DDR3L

so neither of those would be a good match.

The model you have is a CAS 11, 1.35 volt DDR3L SO-DIMM running at 1600Mhz.

There are 4 more detailed timings, and even some additional ones beyond that, but anything close to that should function.

As I said, safest course would be to buy new memory sticks and not use the old one. If getting the exact match isn't easy and you don't mind spending for a larger memory kit, go ahead and do that. I would stick with DDR3L at 1.35 volts, lower CAS is better, but speed is also good. 11 - 1600Mhz is decent, should be kits out there with a CAS or 8 or 9 for 1600Mhz out there.

Can't really be more specific without knowing the motherboard or a specific laptop model.
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
Most systems will treat the first 8GB as a dual bank and be in dual channel. The remaining 4GB would run single channel.

Dual channel is about memory channels and banking.

Other supported configs get more complex, but on desktops you can have 2x4GB + 1x8GB in dual channel mode. 8GB and 16GB with 16GB in dual channel, the remaining 8GB in single channel etc.

Besides, more often then not, when you are talking about 4GB only, any amount of improvement is an advantage to the system.
 

Vox

Distinguished
Aug 9, 2012
126
0
18,680
0
Am rather talking about 8GB (2x4 in dual channel) vs. 12GB (4+8 GB non-dual-channeled).

But as you say if the dual-channel is automatic for the first 8GB does this mean I can pair the existing 4GB RAM with any 1.35V 1600MHz modules (so does not need an identical module to the existing one)?
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
Am rather talking about 8GB (2x4 in dual channel) vs. 12GB (4+8 GB non-dual-channeled).

But as you say if the dual-channel is automatic for the first 8GB does this mean I can pair the existing 4GB RAM with any 1.35V 1600MHz modules (so does not need an identical module to the existing one)?
So am I.

Not the first 8GB per say, it is just how memory banks work. A single memory stick will always be single channel. One channel, one bank. Memory placed in the second slot is in another channel, but still in the first bank, up to the capacity of the memory in the first channel.

It makes more sense if you look at 4 slot designs. 4 sticks != quad channel. On a dual channel system, the two channels are each available from two slots. When you add memory to each channel they are added to each bank. That is why 2x4GB + 1x8GB can be 100% dual channel mode. Mixed mode is a potential feature, and sometimes the exact memory type matters, single sided/double sided.

It doesn't have to be an identical module, no. But it has to be very close. Any mismatch and it will default to the JEDEC specified base speed, either 1066 or 1333 in this case. If you get the timings and voltage right, they can be of different size and still operate at full speed. Of completely different brands.

However, if it doesn't work, OEM motherboard BIOS are often lacking the features necessary to set timings manually.

Safest route is to get identical matching sets, purchased at the same time.

Seeing as how there seems to be plenty of this exact memory available, just pick up some of that.
 

Vox

Distinguished
Aug 9, 2012
126
0
18,680
0
It seems to me as if you're talking about how memory modules work in PCs. I think I know all of these but I don't know about Laptops. There are only 2 memory slots and one is filled with the mentioned 4GB module . I would love to know if I can activate the dual channel with any of the similar samsung RAM types (listed above) because I can't find the identical one in any LOCAL store. Thank you for the links but the linked ones cost a lot. With the shipping cost I would easily pay the amount that I can spend on a 8GB module in the local stores.

So i would like to just find out what would be the best option for me to upgrade the existed 4GB ram. On the local market, there are various models available BUT the existed one. But I don't know which one is better: To buy a 4GB module for Dual-Channel or to buy a 8GB module and forget Dual-Channel. If the first one is a better option I would like to know some examples of compatible modules.
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
Laptops are PCs, so, yes. The same would apply to desktop motherboards with only two slots. Also plenty of motherboards that use SO-DIMM memory. You questioned that part of my statement so I expanded on it. Nothing more.

Laptops are more restrictive, but that is 100% software. Up to the OEM what capabilities they gave to the end user.

If you are asking me to review all those models, that is something you can easily do with the part numbers. No links up there.

Go to the manufacturer's websites, get the spec sheet for each and compare. Just for starters:

M471B5273DH0-CH9 = 1333Mhz rather than 1600Mhz
M471B5273DH0-CK0 = DDR3 at 1.5 volts, not 1.35v DDR3L

so neither of those would be a good match.

The model you have is a CAS 11, 1.35 volt DDR3L SO-DIMM running at 1600Mhz.

There are 4 more detailed timings, and even some additional ones beyond that, but anything close to that should function.

As I said, safest course would be to buy new memory sticks and not use the old one. If getting the exact match isn't easy and you don't mind spending for a larger memory kit, go ahead and do that. I would stick with DDR3L at 1.35 volts, lower CAS is better, but speed is also good. 11 - 1600Mhz is decent, should be kits out there with a CAS or 8 or 9 for 1600Mhz out there.

Can't really be more specific without knowing the motherboard or a specific laptop model.
 

Vox

Distinguished
Aug 9, 2012
126
0
18,680
0
Thank you for all your help, Eximo! I'm now a lot closer to understand the case and I think I could do the upgrade based on the information you provided.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS