Memtest fail with two sticks?

quicksilvr

Honorable
May 5, 2012
2
0
10,510
0
hey everyone, i just finished building my first computer and i decided to run a memtest on it. i threw an error when both were installed, so i removed one and ran memtest again. came up clean. i tested the other one separately too, and it came up clean as well. but when i put them together, i throw errors, not a lot, but errors. What could be the problem?

here's what i got:

AMD Athlon II X3 450 3.2GHz Triple-Core Processor
MSI 760GM-P21 (FX) Micro ATX AM3+ Motherboard
Western Digital Caviar Blue 320GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive
XFX Radeon HD 6770 1GB Video Card
Rosewill 500W ATX12V Power Supply
G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1066 (PC3 8500) Desktop Memory Model F3-8500CL7D-8GBRL


everything's running auto settings on the mobo

thank you so much!
 

bryanl

Distinguished
Aug 31, 2009
233
0
18,710
13
Running more modules together increases the loading of the memory bus, slowing the signals, perhaps too much for marginal chips, and such chips are common since most modules are not made from chips that were fully qualified by their manufacturers. They leave their manufacturers unmarked and even unpackaged, to be tested by the module assemblers, usually to more lenient standards. This is common even with the most popular brands of memory. To avoid such chips, look for modules where the chip part numbers can be red and traced back to their manufacturers. The only way of being guaranteed of this is by choosing Samsung modules.

 

clutchc

Titan
Herald
If both sticks pass memtest (individually tested), it appears the board is faulty. Does the system boot to Windows with both sticks in? If so, run Windows built-in memory diagnostic test for a '2nd opinion'.
 

bryanl

Distinguished
Aug 31, 2009
233
0
18,710
13

Unlikely, considering the brand of memory.
 

bryanl

Distinguished
Aug 31, 2009
233
0
18,710
13
Unlikely, considering the brand of memory.
The memory is from G.Skill, which like the vast majority of memory companies neither produces chips nor tests them as rigorously as any chip manufacturer like Samsung does.

I'm sure the defenders of inferior memory brands will object to my statement.
 

bryanl

Distinguished
Aug 31, 2009
233
0
18,710
13

There is no way to know that, except with further testing of both the sticks and the board.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS