merging 2 ssd's with 1 being C drive

Oct 26, 2018
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i would like to expand space on c drive which is a 120gb SSD, i have my programs and other files seperated between 2 other 2TB hard drives so i could leave the windows program on the one SSD. however i built this pc to suit win 7 now with the later win 10 i feel as if there are extra files and what have you that came with it, i have another 120gb SSD sitting in the bay unallocated and ready to go though i feel as if it wont be able to merge with C drive to make the storage there bigger? Any ideas if it could be done with installing a fresh disk install while installing windows? cheers!
i7 4770k
32gb ram
64 bit
 
Oct 26, 2018
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isnt raid1 just mirroring what i would already have on the c drive? cheers!
 
That's true, RAID0 and similar options do increase the risk of losing everything on the drive units involved in the RAID array. There's also another problem. There are NO standard ways for RAID to be done, so every RAID array needs its own device driver for the OS to be able to use it. To be able to BOOT from a RAID0 array, Windows needs to be able to load that special drier BEFORE it is loaded and running itself. This is an old story and Windows has had a process for doing this for a long time. BUT it's a very particular set-up process. Basically, it requires a NEW Install of Windows on the RAID array. First the array drives have to be installed in the machine and the RAID management tool in BIOS has to be used to create the RAID array. Then a NEW Install of Windows must be done on that array, and early in that process you must choose the option to install a custom device driver from some storage device like a USB stick. (So, that stick has to have the drivers stored on it before you start.) The drivers normally are included on the CD that came with your mobo if you are trying to use the mobo's "built-in" RAID feature.) When those RAID driver(s) are finished installing you tell Windows that is done and it proceeds with the rest of the Install.

Now, of course, since you have just done a new Install of Windows, it knows absolutely nothing about any application software. So you have to re-Install all your application software so that Windows can create the necessary entries in its Registry files and use those apps. THEN you can get to using the complete backups of your old system to copy user-generated files into the proper places on the new storage system.

An alternative for "merging" two drive units into one is called JBOD ("Just a Bunch of Drives"), but it also is a nonstandard system requiring its own device driver. Very often the drivers supplied with a mobo for their RAID systems also include the driver for a JBOD system, even though JBOD is not technically part of RAID. However, this system also would have exactly the same requirement for custom-loading a device driver in a brand new Windows Install in order to use such an array as your BOOT device.
 

karenjoly

Respectable
Apr 13, 2018
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No can do, like Mike says. (You are thinking of SLI for HDD s, eh ?) Raid is too complicated and not recommended much anymore.

You need to rearrange the disk space you have to work with. Your analysis of the free space left over from a windows 10 install might be considered further. It may be that 125 GB is just fine accommodating the OS. My windows folder is less than 20 GB. Progam Files /x86 are ~ another 10. I keep a lean OS. With this approach that 125 GB may suit well.

Once you get to that point, the impossibility of connecting two drives disappears.

Secondly, if you just cannot let go the notion of expansion then use one of the big disks for the OS. Then sell those 2 minnows and move up to an all large drive system.

 

USAFRet

Titan
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Mar 16, 2013
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Merging 2x 120GB SSD's - Bad idea.
You can use the second one just as another drive. It just has a different drive letter.

Install games to it, save your docs to it, whatever.
The only benefit a RAID 0 gives you is a single drive letter.

While a 120GB drive is rather small, there is no reason that can't work as the OS drive.
Be smarter than the PC, and just use them as 2 different drive letters.
 
Oct 26, 2018
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thanks mate looks a bit complex for what i need to achieve. though as a last resort if needed sounds like a decent way (y)
 
Oct 26, 2018
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cheers for the answer, i figured when i built the pc 120 would be enough and as i dont use it as much as id like to (jobs) its been neglected and i guess not maintained? only 30gb for your window files? jeez that is small. cheers for the help might try a fresh install see how we go.
 
Oct 26, 2018
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thanks i just have one sitting there doing nothing but could have a couple of solutions. it is rather small and while looking at other ssd's they have becom a lot cheaper now for lets say a 500gb. that might solve problems in future for storage on C:, or maybe just needs a good damn clean out? (y)
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
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Adding it as a secondary drive and drive letter is no problem.
My system has 6x SSD's, one of them being a 120GB.

Trying to merge them into a single drive letter...far more hassle than its worth.

And of course, a 500GB for ~$85 is a good way forward.
 

inzane4all

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Jun 20, 2018
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Let me add some insight:

I have had x2 SSD's running in RAID0 for the last 4 years without a single problem. Why? Because SSD's are less likely to fail vs old school mech drives. But heck, I've had x2 2 TB 7200 RPM Enterprise level WD HDD in RAID0 as well for all my media without issues also..... BUT, anything higher than 2 drives, and your chances of HW failure do go up, so I'd stick with only 2 SSD drives at a time.

Yes, there is a chance of failure, but that is with any component. What can you to protect your data? Make sure you run backups. I bought a buffalo LS421 drive years ago, and have it running backups for years without issues. The only times where I have had to restore from backups is when there has been an error between the desk and the chair (user error). Other than that I have never experienced drive failures. Just make sure to use the BIOS for the RAID and not Windows Spaces, like some people have done (stay away from software RAID). Good luck!
 
inzane4all is quite correct. I like especially that he / she underlined the need for REGULAR BACKUPS. That is really the only way to assure recovery from data disasters from any cause, so it only makes sense to do that if your risk of data loss is increased. The fact that many people (including inzane4all) have NOT had to deal with failure does not prove it won't happen - it only proves that the statistics are correct, and MOST people do not have that problem. It's a matter of probability versus severity. IF you happen to be one of the UNlucky ones, what can you do to recover? A recent full backup and a good restore tool does WONDERS for your sanity!
 

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