Question Mhz support

Mr Helix

Reputable
Jun 29, 2017
52
0
4,540
1
Hello! i've checked google for an answer, different websites,
I Wanted to upgrade my 8gb ddr3 to 16 preferably to 2400 mhz, but i'm not sure if my mobo supports 2400 mhz
So again, i've checked different websites for answer for some of them say it does support, some doesn't it even mention above 1800.
My mobo is Asus P8H61-M LX3 PLUS R2.0
 
Ram compatability is something you cannot guarantee.
Even if the board only says it's up to 1800, it might let you go to 2400, and it also might not even go a mhz beyond 1666.
It depends on how good the memory controller on your cpu is, and the traces of the motherboard, and even plain old luck.
TBH though, on any cpu that uses ddr3, ram speed is usually not a major concern.
 

Mr Helix

Reputable
Jun 29, 2017
52
0
4,540
1
Ram compatability is something you cannot guarantee.
Even if the board only says it's up to 1800, it might let you go to 2400, and it also might not even go a mhz beyond 1666.
It depends on how good the memory controller on your cpu is, and the traces of the motherboard, and even plain old luck.
TBH though, on any cpu that uses ddr3, ram speed is usually not a major concern.
Well i'll just get 2x8 1600 mhz, thanks for the reply
 
A kit is a matched pair of sticks sold in a single package.
Matching by the ram maker is required to insure proper operation.
Ram is sold in kits for a reason.
A motherboard must manage all the ram using the same specs of voltage, cas and speed.
The internal workings are designed for the capacity of the kit.
Ram from the same vendor and part number can be made up of differing manufacturing components over time.
That is why a single kit sometimes costs more than two apparently identical part numbers.

On speed, I meant nothing more than 1600 speed.
 
Reactions: Mr Helix

Mr Helix

Reputable
Jun 29, 2017
52
0
4,540
1
A kit is a matched pair of sticks sold in a single package.
Matching by the ram maker is required to insure proper operation.
Ram is sold in kits for a reason.
A motherboard must manage all the ram using the same specs of voltage, cas and speed.
The internal workings are designed for the capacity of the kit.
Ram from the same vendor and part number can be made up of differing manufacturing components over time.
That is why a single kit sometimes costs more than two apparently identical part numbers.

On speed, I meant nothing more than 1600 speed.
Hey, if the thread's still open, how about two of these? 1866 mhz. Will these work?
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY