Microsoft Announces InstaLoad Battery Technology

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IFLATLINEI

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Jan 24, 2010
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Designed for the same people who need those directions on shampoo bottles.

fortehluls - Really? Was this supposed to be funny?
 

tntom

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You could do the same by using a bridge rectifier. I've done it many times on small circuits which could be harmed by reverse voltage. Just use 4 diodes with a low voltage drop.
 

cembung

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@weirdguy99 its murphy's law. if there is more than one ways to do something and one of it is wrong, then someone dull enough is going to do it. This battery is designed to have no wrong ways.
 

Emperus

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What is meant by "Microsoft is willing to give the license royalty free".!! Were there expectations of charges to be paid for this..!! Anyway, this is a push towards creating idiocracy on the note of making life more simpler.. Now people don't need to learn the basics with battery terminals also.. This will certainly help in raising peoples IQ.. Nicely done..
 

drutort

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[citation][nom]tntom[/nom]You could do the same by using a bridge rectifier. I've done it many times on small circuits which could be harmed by reverse voltage. Just use 4 diodes with a low voltage drop.[/citation]

ya but this doesnt do jack vs putting - to - or + to + on batteries, it does not correct the flow of current :p what your describing is the final polarity not hte polarity between batteries

and yes like others said, i cant believe it has not been thought of and why didnt i think of it :p
 

IzzyCraft

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If companies want to license the technology for accessibility products aimed at people with vision or learning disabilities, Microsoft is willing to license the technology royalty-free.
What microsoft having a heart, has to be a trick! haha

I thought we could already do this it was just a matter of adding cost onto a device that stopped this. W2go microsoft apparently...
 

Spike53

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If you can't figure out how to place your batteries in devices even by looking at the diagram, natural selection isn't doing its job.
 

nukemaster

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I am betting it was not done before because many changing/discharging(device it self) systems run the batteries in a series. That being said its much cheaper to use a single metal plate to connect the + and - on 2 batteries then to use some complex system.

I see the point above about diodes, yes that would work very well, but over 4 batteries and one per battery, that's a fair loss in voltage.

Its about time batteries are fully fool proof :)
 

Emperus

Splendid


Correct me if i am wrong but rectifiers as i understand them are basically used for ac to dc conversion.. I can understand using diode(s) on a reverse current (dc line) protection role as diodes block dc.. But this very nature would make them unsuitable to be used in forward dc current paths.. And batteries do produce dc current..
 

freiheitner

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[citation][nom]blurr91[/nom]Crap!!! This is one of those "why didn't I think of that" ideas.[/citation]

No kidding. It's taken how many decades for someone to come up with this... and it was Microsoft?! Come on!!
 
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