MIT Discovers Third Kind of Magnetism

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sacre

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[citation][nom]wannabepro[/nom]Interesting.Now please actually use it unlike so many 'break through(s)' that get thrown under the carpet and never heard of again.[/citation]

Take everything with a grain of salt. Nearly every year for the past 15 years i've been seeing articles come out about "3d transistors" and "liquid CPU's" and "laser cpus" and "aids almost cured?" "Cancer cure around corner" "this" "that" "this"

I'm sure its all adding up to something, but 3/4 of these are incomplete studies and 3/4 of them end in failure.

Just like this, we won't hear about it again for another 5-10 years.
 

A Bad Day

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[citation][nom]memadmax[/nom]Apple will sue them before it even reaches the market....[/citation]

Apple would be very insignificant as it was in the 1990's by the time the tech is available for marketing.
 

palladin9479

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[citation][nom]wannabepro[/nom]Interesting.Now please actually use it unlike so many 'break through(s)' that get thrown under the carpet and never heard of again.[/citation]

That is the difference between science and engineering. Science is discovering new concepts behind how the universe works, engineering is about taking those discoveries and making something with them, at a profit (or otherwise worth the time / expense). Many things don't make it to market because it's found to be uneconomical at that time. Kinda of a "yes we could make this super awesome device but it would cost ONE MILLION DOLLARS (in doctor evil voice)". The science and technology still exists, so in the future when materials science or other advanced engineering comes along, they can go back to the previous idea and see if it's feasible to implement.
 

CaedenV

Splendid
[citation][nom]sacre[/nom]Take everything with a grain of salt. Nearly every year for the past 15 years i've been seeing articles come out about "3d transistors" and "liquid CPU's" and "laser cpus" and "aids almost cured?" "Cancer cure around corner" "this" "that" "this"I'm sure its all adding up to something, but 3/4 of these are incomplete studies and 3/4 of them end in failure.Just like this, we won't hear about it again for another 5-10 years.[/citation]
-3D transistors are coming, but not until we hit an end to the current trend of die shrinks, so it will be a few years.
-Never heard of liquid CPUs, but laser/light based switching CPUs are doing well in development. The issue though seems to be that while it can be done, our current track of technology offers better returns on investment, and is the easier tech to continue Moore's Law, so we may never get to see it.
-The problem with the 'cure for cancer' seems to be a fundamental misunderstanding of what cancer is. Cancer is always in our bodies. I have cancer, you have cancer, we all have cancer, it is the very root of evolution. But the thing is that most cancers are not self-sustaining so the cells simply die off, or our bodies have mechanisms to find the mistakes, and remove them before they get out of hand. It is in these stages of preventive medicine that we need to focus our research. Then for those who have cancer we simply need to find a better form of removal. Half killing someone to kill a cancer, or hacking someone to pieces are so dark-age, and scary, and simply ineffective. Focus more on prevention and harboring an environment that is not as conducive to promoting cancerous growth, and then find finer tools for removal so that we can get away from chemo treatments. We will never find the 'silver bullet' against cancer because there isn't one. Each type of cancer is different, and each person's cancer is to some extent unique. Until we can have intelligent nonobots that can watch our DNA, there will not be a cure in the way that everyone is hoping for.
-Aids sucks, but they really are pretty close to at least an inoculation for HIV. It does not help those who already have Aids, but it will help the next generation.

As for the actual article, it made my head spin a bit. The way it is described in the article I am unsure if they are talking about an actual form of magnetism, or that they found a material that behaves oddly around magnetism. Either way, it sounds really neat. If there is a way to get something to behave predictably to electricity or magnetism and can be scaled down to extremely small sizes, then there is a place for it in the field of computers.
 

vittau

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[citation][nom]CaedenV[/nom]-3D transistors are coming, but not until we hit an end to the current trend of die shrinks, so it will be a few years.[/citation]
Aren't 3D transistors (or tri-gate) already being used in the Ivy Bridge processors?
 

palladin9479

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-Aids sucks, but they really are pretty close to at least an inoculation for HIV. It does not help those who already have Aids, but it will help the next generation.
Actually there already is a cure "technically" speaking, it's just incredibly dangerous, expensive and not available for everyone. Timothy Ray Brown was the guys name and he developed leukemia which required a bone marrow transplant. There is a semi-rare Northern European genetic mutation at the CCR5 gene. It makes your cells nearly immune to HIV (though some rarer strains can still attack you). When they did the transplant they used bone marrow from a doner with the CCR5 mutation. The process required that they kill off his old infected marrow and replace them with the immune doner marrow. Very dangerous process that could of easily killed him, very expensive and not available to those anyone not of northern European ancestry due to doner compatibility.
 

thecolorblue

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[citation][nom]wannabepro[/nom]Interesting.Now please actually use it unlike so many 'break through(s)' that get thrown under the carpet and never heard of again.[/citation]
they will try... which is all anyone can ask of them.

on the other hand if large corporate entities with patent interests in a tech that this would compete with actively interfere with the potential for this tech to succeed... well that would be a sad thing indeed for humanity
 

eodeo

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Apple will sue them before it even reaches the market....
I heard that Apple discovered this two years from now and sues original researches as copy cats. I mean, clearly Apple should be granted another 1b$ for their effort.
 

ojas

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[citation][nom]sacre[/nom]Take everything with a grain of salt. Nearly every year for the past 15 years i've been seeing articles come out about "3d transistors"[/citation]
Intel's tri-gate FinFET transistors ARE 3D, i thought?
 

tokencode

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[citation][nom]hytecgowthaman[/nom]Now only 10000rpm hdds are available if this technology comes it give how much rpm in hdds.See in future.[/citation]

Drive go up to 15k rpm for enterprise class.... and this really has nothing to do with the rotational speed of the drives. It doesn't even have anything to with magnetic storage (yet)
 

InvalidError

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[citation][nom]wannabepro[/nom]Now please actually use it unlike so many 'break through(s)' that get thrown under the carpet and never heard of again.[/citation]
Discoveries that advance our understanding of physics do not necessarily yield anything that can be put into practical use. In many cases, many other discoveries need to be made before this can happen because we still lack the necessary knowledge and techniques to do anything useful with the new discovery.

Quantum entanglement was discovered over 10 years ago, was demonstrated a number of times in the last decade but because we have yet to master the various other aspects of quantum physics required to make it work outside of lab environments, practical applications for it are still out of reach.

Many fundamental discoveries take 20-100 years of further research in the fundamental discoveries themselves and supporting elements (the missing bits and bolts to turn fundamental discoveries into something useful beyond academia) to produce practical applications. Oftentimes, one fundamental discovery requires a few other similarly fundamental discoveries before it can do anything meaningful.

It rarely is as simple as discovering something new and putting it in new products overnight. Even "mundane" advancement such as copper interconnect and FinFET/tri-gate/whatever which are relatively obvious have years of research behind them by the time they get to market and often many more years beyond that to refine the designs.
 

CaedenV

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[citation][nom]vittau[/nom]Aren't 3D transistors (or tri-gate) already being used in the Ivy Bridge processors?[/citation]
Not the same thing. Tri-Gate transistors are '3D' in that they are tall but narrow to provide enough resistance to still work at such small die sizes. Actuial '3D' Chips refer to 3D chip design, or layered chip design where the chips are designed like a 3D structure rather than a flat plane. While it could offer some really neat and innovative design improvements over traditional planar design, there is a major issue of heat dissipation for the circuitry in the bottom and middle stacks. One way around this is to die shrink enough where heat is not a major concern, and then limit designs to 2-3 levels so that there would not be too much heat buildup. Another idea is to put the connectors on the edge of the chips, and then have heat disipation materials on both the top and bottom. Yet another idea (which I personally like, but it would only be useful in larger desktop style packages) is to have a backplane with all shared resources, and then have the cores and iGPU come off perpendicular to this backplane in little fins which have some sort of heat dissipation material between them. This could be neat for desktop designs which have a ton of cores which need to communicate with as little physical distance between them as possible, but the nature of the design would be too tall (z height) to ever be used in mobile applications where the market is really headed.
 

CaedenV

Splendid
[citation][nom]palladin9479[/nom]Actually there already is a cure "technically" speaking, it's just incredibly dangerous, expensive and not available for everyone. Timothy Ray Brown was the guys name and he developed leukemia which required a bone marrow transplant. There is a semi-rare Northern European genetic mutation at the CCR5 gene. It makes your cells nearly immune to HIV (though some rarer strains can still attack you). When they did the transplant they used bone marrow from a doner with the CCR5 mutation. The process required that they kill off his old infected marrow and replace them with the immune doner marrow. Very dangerous process that could of easily killed him, very expensive and not available to those anyone not of northern European ancestry due to doner compatibility.[/citation]
That is pretty awesome! Somehow I missed that one.
 

CaedenV

Splendid
[citation][nom]hytecgowthaman[/nom]Now only 10000rpm hdds are available if this technology comes it give how much rpm in hdds.See in future.[/citation]
HDDs are a nearly dead technology. Spindle speed pretty much only helps with seek time, and has only a moderate effect on drive throughput. SSDs offer .1ms (or less) seek speed, while a 15K RPM drive offers ~5ms seek time at the cost of a lot of heat, noise, and power. Within the next 5 years we will see a near abandonment of HDDs in the server markets, and we are already seeing SSDs take over as system drives. HDDs only really have a place in larger enthusiast systems for bulk storage. I know I am looking at getting a pair of 3TB drives for my system this spring, and I fully expect these to be the last traditional HDDs that I ever purchase for myself. SSD prices are dropping like a rock, and we are expecting to see 1TB mainstream, and 2TB enthusiast drives to his the market by the end of 2013, so in 5-7 years when my big HDDs need replacing there should be some 'affordable' 4+TB drives available.
Think of it this way, all manufacturers are having QC issues at 1TB per platter, and HAMR tech will help reliability, but is only going to make drives more expensive, hot, and power hungry. Meanwhile, SSD manufacturers can currently cram 1TB of storage in a laptop-sized drive, and with the die shrinks next year they will be able to fit 2TB in the space of a laptop drive, which is something that HDD manufacturers cannot do. SSDs win on heat, density, seek time, throughput, and even reliability in most applications. You do pay a premium for it, but considering you can already find deals on SSDs for ~50 cents per GB, it will not be very long before HDD manufacturers will be forced to either move to hybrid drives, pure SSDs, or simply close up shop entirely.
 

amigafan

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Unlike the other two kinds of magnetism, the magnetic orientations of the individual particles within it fluctuate constantly
Could this effect be used a la perpetuum mobile for generating electricity by electromagnetic induction?
 

fuzzion

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Sigh.

The future of the CPU lies in quantum computing.
The future of storage lies in holographic crystallines.
The future of superconductors will benefit from QSL now that it is possible to reach zero state.
The future of energy will be solar panels capable of transforming the entire spectrum of light into energy
The future of propulsion will be propulsion gravitational wave
The future of investment is to buy as much ICE indexes as you can.
 
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