[SOLVED] Mixing RAM

May 28, 2022
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Hi there folks!
I'm about to increase my RAM size on PC from 16gb to 32gb.

Now I have single stick Kingston HyperX Fury 3600 cl17 (HX436C17FB3A/16).
I was searching for identical ne but it is gone out of production.
So, I found the one almost matching mine which is also single stick Kingston HyperX Fury 3600 but the name states cl18 (KF436C18BBA/16).
However, on both sticks JEDEC timings are DDR4-2400 CL17-17-17 @ 1.2V. Just having different xmp profiles.
So I might assume both run somewhat matching basic hardware and I guess controller should handle it well and just run both sticks with timings of a slower one (is it though?). Anyways, if things go wrong with XMP I might be able to tweak timing manually.

There is one more notable difference which bothers me: my stick is two-rank while the one I'm about to purchase is single rank.

So here's my question: is it going to work together? I know there's always somewhat a lottery with RAM compatibility, just trying to hit my best odds.
If yes, should I run it on same channel or different ones?
Selling one I have and getting set is not an option for now.

Below are specifications for both sticks listed by manufacturer documents.

RAM I have:


RAM I would want to buy:
 

geofelt

Titan
What is the make/model of your motherboard and cpu?

Ram is sold in kits for a reason.
A motherboard must manage all the ram using the same specs of voltage, cas and speed.
The internal workings are designed for the capacity of the kit.
Ram from the same vendor and part number can be made up of differing manufacturing components over time.
Some motherboards, particularly ryzen, can be very sensitive to this.
This is more difficult when more sticks are involved.
Ram must be matched for proper operation.

You can sometimes compensate for errors by increasing the ram voltage in the motherboard bios if you have a overclocking motherboard.

What is plan B if the new stick does not work properly?

I might suggest that you buy a 2 x 16gb kit with specs as close to your original stick as possible. You will be guaranteed 32gb of ram.
Then, try installing the old ram.
To test,
Run memtest86 or memtest86+
They boot from a usb stick and do not use windows.
You can download them here:
If you can run a full pass with NO errors, your ram should be ok.

Running several more passes will sometimes uncover an issue, but it takes more time.
Probably not worth it unless you really suspect a ram issue.


If it works, fine, you now have 48gb,
Otherwise sell the old sick or keep it as backup.
 
Reactions: RainSong

Lafong

Respectable
So here's my question: is it going to work together? I know there's always somewhat a lottery with RAM compatibility, just trying to hit my best odds.
Consider your issues if it doesn't work to your satisfaction.

Do you walk across the street and get your money back?

Have to deal with the post office and standing in line?

Get into a beef with the seller for whatever reason?

Delays, aggravation.

Some of that you can guess at; some not.

Weigh those possibilities against the net cost of buying a new pair.
 
Reactions: RainSong

geofelt

Titan
What is the make/model of your motherboard and cpu?

Ram is sold in kits for a reason.
A motherboard must manage all the ram using the same specs of voltage, cas and speed.
The internal workings are designed for the capacity of the kit.
Ram from the same vendor and part number can be made up of differing manufacturing components over time.
Some motherboards, particularly ryzen, can be very sensitive to this.
This is more difficult when more sticks are involved.
Ram must be matched for proper operation.

You can sometimes compensate for errors by increasing the ram voltage in the motherboard bios if you have a overclocking motherboard.

What is plan B if the new stick does not work properly?

I might suggest that you buy a 2 x 16gb kit with specs as close to your original stick as possible. You will be guaranteed 32gb of ram.
Then, try installing the old ram.
To test,
Run memtest86 or memtest86+
They boot from a usb stick and do not use windows.
You can download them here:
If you can run a full pass with NO errors, your ram should be ok.

Running several more passes will sometimes uncover an issue, but it takes more time.
Probably not worth it unless you really suspect a ram issue.


If it works, fine, you now have 48gb,
Otherwise sell the old sick or keep it as backup.
 
Reactions: RainSong
May 28, 2022
2
0
10
0
What is the make/model of your motherboard and cpu?

Ram is sold in kits for a reason.
A motherboard must manage all the ram using the same specs of voltage, cas and speed.
The internal workings are designed for the capacity of the kit.
Ram from the same vendor and part number can be made up of differing manufacturing components over time.
Some motherboards, particularly ryzen, can be very sensitive to this.
This is more difficult when more sticks are involved.
Ram must be matched for proper operation.

You can sometimes compensate for errors by increasing the ram voltage in the motherboard bios if you have a overclocking motherboard.

What is plan B if the new stick does not work properly?

I might suggest that you buy a 2 x 16gb kit with specs as close to your original stick as possible. You will be guaranteed 32gb of ram.
Then, try installing the old ram.
To test,
Run memtest86 or memtest86+
They boot from a usb stick and do not use windows.
You can download them here:
If you can run a full pass with NO errors, your ram should be ok.

Running several more passes will sometimes uncover an issue, but it takes more time.
Probably not worth it unless you really suspect a ram issue.


If it works, fine, you now have 48gb,
Otherwise sell the old sick or keep it as backup.
Thank you! This sounds more like a plan!
I have ryzen 2700 and motherboard asus tuf b450 pro.
I actually consider a small (and cheap) upgrade to ryzen 5600x and plus 16gb ram for 32gb total. That's why the issue with ram occurred.
 

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