Question MoBo and CPU dead?

hondoman

Honorable
Jul 24, 2014
82
2
10,545
3
Good morning,

About 2 months ago, I decided to upgrade a 5-years old PC. I bought the components and installed them. At first the PC worked, then crashed. I failed to install a new version of Windows. Ok. So, I tried countless times to install Windows and various Linux OS' to no avail.

Each time, with Windows, the symbol would appear and the spinning wheel would make one rotation then freeze. With Linux, it would simply not install.

I gave in and took the PC to a repair shop I've used in the past. They're good. They rang and told me the CPU and MoBo are dead. Can that be?

I was able to enter the BIOS with no issue. The BIOS would see the USB sticks or CDs from attempts at install. And the Windows logo would appear? Truly the CPU and Mobo are dead?

Something seems off to me.

Thoughts?

MoBo: MSI A320M-A PRO MAX
CPU: AMD Ryzen 3 3200G, 4x 3600 MHz
RAM: 8 GB DDR4-RAM, 3000 MHz, G.SKILL Aegis
WLAN: WLAN PCIe Karte 867 MBit/s (300 MBit/s @ 2,4 GHz) (Currently removed)
Radeon Vega 8 OnChip

Cheers!
 

avg9956

Commendable
Apr 7, 2019
254
52
1,790
11
As long as you're able to enter the BIOS and your BIOS detects all of your drives, your CPU, your RAM and reads them correctly, then these components are likely to still be in good condition.

I suspect its the drive that you're using (if you're still using the old drive that is, not sure which components you bought and installed). You haven't specified if its a HDD or SSD (Sata or M.2 NVMe). If its a SSD, I'd highly suspect it needs replacing as the controllers tend to overheat, over a 5 year course I would be doubtful it would still last. That might explain why you failed to install the new version of Windows.

IMO, HDDs have longer longevity than SSDs in my experience and based from what I've seen lately. Its mainly due to the heat output of the SSD coming from the controller. SSDs do perform well in higher temperatures, but its not possible to escape the effect of heat on lifespans which inevitably contribute to failure.

Are you also trying to install Windows and Linux as dual boot?
 

hondoman

Honorable
Jul 24, 2014
82
2
10,545
3
As long as you're able to enter the BIOS and your BIOS detects all of your drives, your CPU, your RAM and reads them correctly, then these components are likely to still be in good condition.

I suspect its the drive that you're using (if you're still using the old drive that is, not sure which components you bought and installed). You haven't specified if its a HDD or SSD (Sata or M.2 NVMe). If its a SSD, I'd highly suspect it needs replacing as the controllers tend to overheat, over a 5 year course I would be doubtful it would still last. That might explain why you failed to install the new version of Windows.

IMO, HDDs have longer longevity than SSDs in my experience and based from what I've seen lately. Its mainly due to the heat output of the SSD coming from the controller. SSDs do perform well in higher temperatures, but its not possible to escape the effect of heat on lifespans which inevitably contribute to failure.

Are you also trying to install Windows and Linux as dual boot?

The components I listed above were the ones installed. I have two SSDs - Biwin and Samsung. Both are about 4 years old. I have a spare PC and ran Disk Part on both. They appear to be ok.

I agree that the BIOS sees everything in the PC, so to tell me they're dead makes no sence.

I'm not trying to load both Linux and Windows. I was trying one or the other. Which ever loaded, I'd use.

Perhaps I should try a new SSD and see if that changes anything.

Cheers!
 

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