Question MOCA adapter for Altice One

May 11, 2020
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Hi,

I currently have Altice One as the service provider. I opted for one main Altice box which is an all in one and that is located on one end of the house. My computer room is on the other end 2nd floor and wifi signal is very week. Is it possible to use a MOCA adapter with the altice system? There is a coaxial cable system running all through out the house but it does pass thru a splitter in the basement.
I considered using a power line adapter but read here that MOCA is better.

Please advise on alternatives. Thanks!
 
You can use a moca adapter with anything with an ethernet port. :) The key is to have a coax cable between both moca adapters, and you'll have to check your splitter to make sure it is moca compliant. Or you can just couple the two coax segments together if you're not using it for anything else and you're ready to go.

Moca will attain much, much higher speeds than powerline. And aside from prepping the wiring, the actual adapter installation is just as simple--plug it in and they just work or don't. :)
 
May 11, 2020
16
0
10
0
You can use a moca adapter with anything with an ethernet port. :) The key is to have a coax cable between both moca adapters, and you'll have to check your splitter to make sure it is moca compliant. Or you can just couple the two coax segments together if you're not using it for anything else and you're ready to go.

Moca will attain much, much higher speeds than powerline. And aside from prepping the wiring, the actual adapter installation is just as simple--plug it in and they just work or don't. :)

How would I know if the splitter is MOCA compliant?
By splitter I mean something like this item: PDI-3WMS-5 - it's is passive with 1 coax input and 3 coax outs.

So right now the main coax coming into the house is getting connected to the altice box. Can I have a MOCA router using that same coax ffeding the altice box (with a splitter) or does it have to be a dedicated coax all by it self?
 
This is a pretty good guide to the splitters as well as all the considerations for a moca network:

Yep, that's a splitter. And when I looked that particular one up, it does seem like it is moca compliant if this is it:


You can use the same coax, but it will need to connect to the coax endpoint where your computer is. This is where a splitter may become necessary. You might also need a moca filter to prevent the moca signal from feeding back into the cable system.

If you have a dedicated coax, that makes everything a lot easier though because then we don't have to worry about the moca signal going anywhere we don't want it.
 

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