Question Modem doesn't connect to internet when using longer coaxial cords.

Mar 12, 2019
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Ok so basically i wanted to move my modem to a more central place in the house. Originally it was connected to the main line with a coupler and another cord that was about 2 feet or so and it works fine. But then i attached about 60 ft to it (2 30 foot coaxial cables Rg6) and when i did that i realized that my modem was failing to connect to the internet. So i thought hey maybe it's one of the cables, so i detached the two additional cables, and tried just connecting to them separately and i got the same results of not working. So then i tried a 3rd cord about the same length and it still didn't receive any internet. So I was wondering if anyone had any ideas on what i could or what im doing wrong?
 
There is a limit on the amount of cable you can have but it is more of a signal level limit since it is also affected by splitters or couplers.

Your modem should have some kind of screen that shows thinks like power level, signal noise, errors etc. What the optimal values are a bit different based on things like what type of docsis your ISP is using. I would recommend you search google since I do not want to replicate those large tables here.

I suspect the numbers maybe going over the limits when you add the cable. If you are very close to the limits you may want to see if your ISP can do anything to improve the signal levels to your house. You really want to take your modem and connect it to the first point the ISP wire comes into your house. This is purely to see the numbers so it does not really matter if you can actually use the modem at that location. It will tell you how much your in house wiring is affecting the signals. You want the path as simple as you can to the point it comes in the house. You want as few splitters or other connection to this as your can.
 
Generally, there should be a single passive 2-way coax splitter BEFORE the modem:

MAIN line ---> Passive2Splitter ----> Side1 to modem/Side2 to TVs. More splitters AFTER modem for TVs.

If doing it this way not feasible, coax splitter not easily accessible, you may need to place an Active, Powered Splitter BEFORE the modem, to amplify the already split and weakened signal, and this Active Splitter needs to have an Active Return.

SAMPLE, not endorsement of this product
 
Last edited:
Mar 12, 2019
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Hey thank you everyone for their quick replies, i decided to just put an ethernet cable in place of the coaxial cables and then connect it to a router so that it would spread the signal evenly and it worked. Thanks for the help though
 

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