Question Monitor disconnects then reconnects when closing full-screen or maximized applications ?

xWinterSolstice

Distinguished
Jul 1, 2014
32
1
18,530
0
The title nearly says it all. The monitor is an Asus VE248, 24". Refresh rate is 60 Hz, I've made sure it's set to 60 Hz. It is one of two monitors in a dual-monitor setup. Almost every time I close a maximized or full-screen application like an internet browser (most often Chrome) or a game, my monitor will disconnect for a couple of seconds then reconnect.
I've tried reseating the cable in its port and reinstalling my Nvidia drivers. I don't know what the problem is.

Specs:
Gigabye X570 Aorus Ultra
GTX 1060
Ryzen 7 2700X
Western Digital 1TB Black M.2 SSD
Windows 10
 

xWinterSolstice

Distinguished
Jul 1, 2014
32
1
18,530
0
PSU: make, model, wattage, age, condition (original to build, new, refurbished, used)? History of heavy use for gaming, video editing, or even bit-mining?

RAM configuration?
PSU is in my signature line. Corsair CX-M Series CX600M 600W 80 Plus Bronze. It is 8 years old. I have never had problems with it before, and I'm only having this problem since introducing the second monitor. RAM is also in signature line, 16 GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4. I have not altered the way the RAM functions, so it should be running at its factory frequency of 3000 MHz. As far as where the RAM is seated, the slots are alternated. Either slots 1 and 3, or 2 and 4. I don't remember which, I'd have to retrieve the mobo booklet from my closet to know for sure. I built this PC with all new parts in 2014, and the PSU is the only original part left in it. Yes the rig has been used primarily for gaming, but not video editing or mining. The next oldest part would be the GPU, bought new in 2017. RAM and mobo bought new in 2019. M.2 bought in 2021. The monitor in question was gently used by a tech support business and was sold to me because they were downsizing and shutting that location down. It was used for normal business stuff like spreadsheets, video and voice calls. and standard desktop applications.
 
Last edited:

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
"It is 8 years old. I have never had problems with it before "

Unfortunately that PSU may be nearing, or even beyond, its' designed in EOL (End of Life).

Remember that PSUs provide 3 different voltages ( 3, 5, and 12) to various system components. Just one of those voltages that begins faltering can and will wreak havoc on the supported system.

Do you have a multi-meter and know how to use it? Or know someone who does?

FYI:

https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-manually-test-a-power-supply-with-a-multimeter-2626158

Not a full test because the PSU is not under load. However, any voltages out of tolerance make the PSU suspect. Especially if performance is inconsistent.

If anything, if possible, swap in another known working PSU. 600 Watts minimum but increase the wattage if you can.

Do not mix and match PSU cables. Use the cables provided with the test PSU.

One other note: When installing RAM do check the motherboard's documentation. Some motherboards require that the first physically installed RAM module be placed in a specific slot.
 

xWinterSolstice

Distinguished
Jul 1, 2014
32
1
18,530
0
"It is 8 years old. I have never had problems with it before "

Unfortunately that PSU may be nearing, or even beyond, its' designed in EOL (End of Life).

Remember that PSUs provide 3 different voltages ( 3, 5, and 12) to various system components. Just one of those voltages that begins faltering can and will wreak havoc on the supported system.

Do you have a multi-meter and know how to use it? Or know someone who does?

FYI:

https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-manually-test-a-power-supply-with-a-multimeter-2626158

Not a full test because the PSU is not under load. However, any voltages out of tolerance make the PSU suspect. Especially if performance is inconsistent.

If anything, if possible, swap in another known working PSU. 600 Watts minimum but increase the wattage if you can.

Do not mix and match PSU cables. Use the cables provided with the test PSU.

One other note: When installing RAM do check the motherboard's documentation. Some motherboards require that the first physically installed RAM module be placed in a specific slot.
I don't have a multimeter, but someone I know might. RAM should be fine, I did consult my mobo documentation when installing. One thing I just noticed yesterday was that after putting my computer to sleep and waking it back up, Windows no longer detects that monitor as a playback device (it has built-in speakers). I have to restart the system to be able to use it for audio playback.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Look in Reliability History and Event Viewer.

Either one or both tools may be capturing some error code, warning, or even an informational event that you can associate with the failures.

Temporarily turn off all power and screen savers and avoid putting the computer to sleep.

Then determine if the failures stop or change in some manner.
 

xWinterSolstice

Distinguished
Jul 1, 2014
32
1
18,530
0
Look in Reliability History and Event Viewer.

Either one or both tools may be capturing some error code, warning, or even an informational event that you can associate with the failures.

Temporarily turn off all power and screen savers and avoid putting the computer to sleep.

Then determine if the failures stop or change in some manner.
I installed another M.2 in my system today, and now my computer isn't detecting my GPU. I'm starting to think maybe you were right about the PSU, maybe now with the M.2 installed it may be at capacity and unable to properly power the GPU. I'm going to have to tinker more with it later to narrow down what my problem is, and if the monitor issues and GPU issues are related. I'll take your previous response into consideration when troubleshooting
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Remember: be very deliberate and methodical in your troubleshooting.

Take your time.

Read/review specs, installation instructions, configuration settings etc.. All too easy to overlook or misconfigure some setting that could be the root of it all.

Change only one thing at a time and allow time between changes.

And, as you always should be doing anyway, be sure that all important data is backed up at least 2 x to locations off the problem computer.

Verify that the backups are both recoverable and readable.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY