Question Monitor not getting 240hz

Jul 25, 2019
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So i know alot of people asked, but non of the solutions worked for me, so maybe i am doing some different
I have a Samsung UE55D 55in Professional Display, some sites said it would go to 240hz, and another site said 120hz, either way i want to get 120hz or higher. I use a ZotacGaming RTX 2070, 3 display ports and one hdmi. I tried using HDMI and only goes to 60hz, then i tried displayport, same thing. I don't know what im doing wrong. Is this only really only 60HZ? I looked it up and it has HDMI 1.2(which i know only does 60hz) and Display port 1.2 http://prntscr.com/ojqf3b <- thats a screenshot of the info on Samsung's site
http://prntscr.com/ojqfpy <- thats the info on B&H's site. Both do way over 60hz, but i can only do 60hz
http://prntscr.com/ojqg5q <- thats my NVIDIA control panel
http://prntscr.com/ojqgy2 <- thats my system info.
Sorry if i am typing to much, i just want to provide as much info as i can. for all i know this might not be a UE55D like it says on the box. I got it free from a company my friend worked for. So maybe they switched boxes but i don't know what to do. Thanks!
 
Mar 2, 2019
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go under 'PC' on NV control panel, you will see more option there. Worked for my gaming monitor
edit: also, 1080p alrealy looks kinda pixel-ly on my 24" monitor. Is there kind of a use case for a 55"because it is kinda weird. Just curious tho
 

boju

Champion
This display only accepts 60Hz raw input from an external source. 240Hz is Motion Enhancement Technology built in the TV, this is different and doesn't mean 240Hz from a computer.

An example of my Panasonic plasma having 600Hz subfield processing used to smooth out motion. All TVs use similar techniques internally.
 
Jul 25, 2019
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This display only accepts 60Hz raw input from an external source. 240Hz is Motion Enhancement Technology built in the TV, this is different and doesn't mean 240Hz from a computer.

An example of my Panasonic plasma having 600Hz subfield processing used to smooth out motion. All TVs use similar techniques internally.
So this means it is only 60hz capable?
 

boju

Champion
Might be able to overclock the display by creating a custom resolution and increasing Hz slightly to see how far you can go. Wouldn't be much more at 1080p. It'll either work or it gives a blank screen and in the situation of it giving a blank screen don't touch any keys to accidentally apply changes. Let the timer run out.
 
Mar 2, 2019
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Might be able to overclock the display by creating a custom resolution and increasing Hz slightly to see how far you can go. Wouldn't be much more at 1080p. It'll either work or it gives a blank screen and in the situation of it giving a blank screen don't touch any keys to accidentally apply changes. Let the timer run out.
I guess you can't even overclock it since it's a TV. The processor in the TV shouldn't be powerful enough to process more frames
 
Jul 25, 2019
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welp thanks guys, thought i had a really nice 240hz, turns out it really isn't nice at all, since i traded it with a 75hz 21in monitor, thought i got a better deal
 
It's already been answered, but I'd like to explain a bit more how this all comes together and avoid marketing fishing techniques.

There's a reported refresh rate for the screen/panel itself and then what the monitor implements internally to support said panel and then exposes through the drivers. In your case, they probably said "smoothing sub-frame of 240Hz" (which is probably the internal refresh at which the monitor/TV processes the input or images internally or even interpolation) but in turn it just exposes 60Hz through HDMI and DisplayPort when it needs to expose itself. There's also the version of the protocols the TV and GPU support, as each protocol version supports different speeds, which in turn mean different max size and refresh rates supported. If the TV/monitor say "120Hz", then they can't use HDMI 1.0 for instance as it only supported, per spec, 1080p 60Hz tops. Same with the GPU support. If you connect a monitor/TV with 120Hz+ to a GPU with an HDMI 1.0 connector, then you won't be able to use more than 1080p@60Hz.

I hope that's helpful.

Cheers!
 

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