[SOLVED] Monitor Suddenly Went No Display

Jul 31, 2020
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Hi guys
I'm having some problem
I was playing heavily modded Skyrim @1080p, about 1 hr later my monitor went blue screen and it says "no signal". FPS were fine at 60, GPU temps 71C, CPU at 70. The PC itself stays turned on. I had to force restart my PC. the first time it wasn't able to enter Windows, but the second time it finally did enter Windows and right now it's in use. Having no problems so far but i'm still concerned that it may occur in the future. I didn't OC my GPU, i set the fan to run 55% all the time, 60% and above when it reaches 70C to minimalize heat.

My Potato PC:
i5-4690
Cooler Master i70c
ECS H81H3-MV
2x4GB DDR3 1600Mhz
Zotac GTX 1060 GB AMP! Edition
FSP Raider 550W 80+ Silver
WD Blue 500GB 7200RPM
TCL LED TV 24" 60Hz

What could be the problem?
Thanks in advance
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
You need a new power supply. Read this, which is my guide on common power supply model recommendations.


And this, which is a good guide to determining what CAPACITY of power supply you need. Ignore "PSU calculators", as they are pure BS.

http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm

This is also, grudgingly, a pretty fair measuring stick overall when trying to decide on a model.

 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
How old is your FSP Raider in years of service?

How long has the graphics card been in service?

If we're being honest, your FSP Raider is the main suspect here, especially if it's about six years old like the rest of the system. It wasn't a terribly good power supply to begin with. Clearly though, both your motherboard and graphics card could be to blame as well.

Download HWinfo. Install it. Run it. Choose the "Sensors only" option. Scroll down to the system 12v, 5v and 3v listings and take a screenshot. Then, run Furmark, and take another screenshot of the same sensor values. Post the screenshots here as follows.

 
Jul 31, 2020
21
1
15
0
How old is your FSP Raider in years of service?

How long has the graphics card been in service?

If we're being honest, your FSP Raider is the main suspect here, especially if it's about six years old like the rest of the system. It wasn't a terribly good power supply to begin with. Clearly though, both your motherboard and graphics card could be to blame as well.

Download HWinfo. Install it. Run it. Choose the "Sensors only" option. Scroll down to the system 12v, 5v and 3v listings and take a screenshot. Then, run Furmark, and take another screenshot of the same sensor values. Post the screenshots here as follows.

Bought the PSU & GPU from a friend couple months ago, says he rarely uses the PSU bc he has a more powerful one, the GPU itself is from 2019.

EDIT:
Since i couldn't paste image links, i'll have to use share link media:
HWMonitor Before Furmark
HWMonitor After Furmark
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Do you see those readings? Can there be any question of what your problem is?

7v on the 12v rail, without ANY load? How is it even running like that. I can't trust those readings though. Do it again, but this time, do as I asked and use HWinfo, NOT HWmonitor. HWmonitor is a POS to be honest.


Monitoring software

HWmonitor, Open hardware monitor, Realtemp, Speccy, Speedfan, Windows utilities, CPU-Z, NZXT CAM and most of the bundled motherboard utilities are often not the best choice as they are not always accurate. Some are actually grossly inaccurate, especially with certain chipsets or specific sensors that for whatever reason they tend to not like or work well with. I've found HWinfo or CoreTemp to be the MOST accurate with the broadest range of chipsets and sensors. They are also almost religiously kept up to date.

CoreTemp is great for just CPU thermals including core temps or distance to TJmax on older AMD platforms.

HWinfo is great for pretty much EVERYTHING, including CPU thermals, core loads, core temps, package temps, GPU sensors, HDD and SSD sensors, motherboard chipset and VRM sensor, all of it. When starting HWinfo after installation, always check the box next to "sensors only" and de-select the box next to "summary".


Run HWinfo and look at system voltages and other sensor readings.

Monitoring temperatures, core speeds, voltages, clock ratios and other reported sensor data can often help to pick out an issue right off the bat. HWinfo is a good way to get that data and in my experience tends to be more accurate than some of the other utilities available. CPU-Z, GPU-Z and Core Temp all have their uses but HWinfo tends to have it all laid out in a more convenient fashion so you can usually see what one sensor is reporting while looking at another instead of having to flip through various tabs that have specific groupings, plus, it is extremely rare for HWinfo to not report the correct sensor values under the correct sensor listings, or misreport other information. Utilities like HWmonitor, Openhardware monitor and Speccy, tend to COMMONLY misreport sensor data, or not report it at all.

After installation, run the utility and when asked, choose "sensors only". The other window options have some use but in most cases everything you need will be located in the sensors window. If you're taking screenshots to post for troubleshooting, it will most likely require taking three screenshots and scrolling down the sensors window between screenshots in order to capture them all.

It is most helpful if you can take a series of HWinfo screenshots at idle, after a cold boot to the desktop. Open HWinfo and wait for all of the Windows startup processes to complete. Usually about four or five minutes should be plenty. Take screenshots of all the HWinfo sensors.

Next, run something demanding like Prime95 (With AVX and AVX2 disabled) or Heaven benchmark. Take another set of screenshots while either of those is running so we can see what the hardware is doing while under a load.


*Download HWinfo




For temperature monitoring only, I feel Core Temp is the most accurate and also offers a quick visual reference for core speed, load and CPU voltage:


*Download Core Temp
 
Jul 31, 2020
21
1
15
0
Do you see those readings? Can there be any question of what your problem is?

7v on the 12v rail, without ANY load? How is it even running like that. I can't trust those readings though. Do it again, but this time, do as I asked and use HWinfo, NOT HWmonitor. HWmonitor is a POS to be honest.


Monitoring software

HWmonitor, Open hardware monitor, Realtemp, Speccy, Speedfan, Windows utilities, CPU-Z, NZXT CAM and most of the bundled motherboard utilities are often not the best choice as they are not always accurate. Some are actually grossly inaccurate, especially with certain chipsets or specific sensors that for whatever reason they tend to not like or work well with. I've found HWinfo or CoreTemp to be the MOST accurate with the broadest range of chipsets and sensors. They are also almost religiously kept up to date.

CoreTemp is great for just CPU thermals including core temps or distance to TJmax on older AMD platforms.

HWinfo is great for pretty much EVERYTHING, including CPU thermals, core loads, core temps, package temps, GPU sensors, HDD and SSD sensors, motherboard chipset and VRM sensor, all of it. When starting HWinfo after installation, always check the box next to "sensors only" and de-select the box next to "summary".


Run HWinfo and look at system voltages and other sensor readings.

Monitoring temperatures, core speeds, voltages, clock ratios and other reported sensor data can often help to pick out an issue right off the bat. HWinfo is a good way to get that data and in my experience tends to be more accurate than some of the other utilities available. CPU-Z, GPU-Z and Core Temp all have their uses but HWinfo tends to have it all laid out in a more convenient fashion so you can usually see what one sensor is reporting while looking at another instead of having to flip through various tabs that have specific groupings, plus, it is extremely rare for HWinfo to not report the correct sensor values under the correct sensor listings, or misreport other information. Utilities like HWmonitor, Openhardware monitor and Speccy, tend to COMMONLY misreport sensor data, or not report it at all.

After installation, run the utility and when asked, choose "sensors only". The other window options have some use but in most cases everything you need will be located in the sensors window. If you're taking screenshots to post for troubleshooting, it will most likely require taking three screenshots and scrolling down the sensors window between screenshots in order to capture them all.

It is most helpful if you can take a series of HWinfo screenshots at idle, after a cold boot to the desktop. Open HWinfo and wait for all of the Windows startup processes to complete. Usually about four or five minutes should be plenty. Take screenshots of all the HWinfo sensors.

Next, run something demanding like Prime95 (With AVX and AVX2 disabled) or Heaven benchmark. Take another set of screenshots while either of those is running so we can see what the hardware is doing while under a load.


*Download HWinfo




For temperature monitoring only, I feel Core Temp is the most accurate and also offers a quick visual reference for core speed, load and CPU voltage:


*Download Core Temp
I don't know much about voltage, this is a great knowledge. Your explanations are detailed, makes me easier to understand.

Just finished doing what you've explained above.
Here's the result:

Idle
Full Load
Uengine Bench

Also, i did little research about it, 7v at 12v is definitely too low, right? So my questions are, what is at fault here? What do i need to upgrade? PSU or my mainboard?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
You need a new power supply. Read this, which is my guide on common power supply model recommendations.


And this, which is a good guide to determining what CAPACITY of power supply you need. Ignore "PSU calculators", as they are pure BS.

http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm

This is also, grudgingly, a pretty fair measuring stick overall when trying to decide on a model.

 
Jul 31, 2020
21
1
15
0
You need a new power supply. Read this, which is my guide on common power supply model recommendations.


And this, which is a good guide to determining what CAPACITY of power supply you need. Ignore "PSU calculators", as they are pure BS.

http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm

This is also, grudgingly, a pretty fair measuring stick overall when trying to decide on a model.

Very well
I'll read it thoroughly and decide what good psu i should buy

Anyway, thanks for everything. You've been really helpful
I'll mark this topic as solved
 

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