Monitor turns off and computer fans get really loud

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Double check that the CPU cooler is firmly mounted all the way around. Sometimes these stock coolers pop out one of the pushpins or the lock on one of the corners comes undone.

What is your case model?

How many case fans do you have and what sizes are they?

What orientation is the airflow for each case fan?

Have you monitored the thermal sensors for the CPU and GPU to verify that one of them is not overheating? Are the CPU and GPU card fans spinning normally at normal RPMs?

Screenshots of the thermal readings under load would be a good place to start.

Click the spoiler box for more detailed instructions.

HWmonitor, Open hardware monitor, Realtemp, Speccy, Speedfan, Windows utilities, CPU-Z and most of the bundled motherboard utilities are often not the best choice as they are not always accurate. Some are actually grossly inaccurate, especially with certain chipsets or specific sensors that for whatever reason they tend to not like or work well with. I've found HWinfo or CoreTemp to be the MOST accurate with the broadest range of chipsets and sensors. They are also almost religiously kept up to date.

CoreTemp is great for just CPU thermals including core temps or distance to TJmax on AMD platforms.

HWinfo is great for pretty much EVERYTHING, including CPU thermals, core loads, core temps, package temps, GPU sensors, HDD and SSD sensors, motherboard chipset and VRM sensor, all of it. Always select the "Sensors only" option when running HWinfo.

In cases where it is relevant and you are seeking help, then in order to help you, it's often necessary to SEE what's going on, in the event one of us can pick something out that seems out of place, or other indicators that just can't be communicated via a text only post. In these cases, posting an image of the HWinfo sensors or something else can be extremely helpful. That may not be the case in YOUR thread, but if it is then the information at the following link will show you how to do that:

*How to post images in Tom's hardware forums



Run HWinfo and look at system voltages and other sensor readings.

Monitoring temperatures, core speeds, voltages, clock ratios and other reported sensor data can often help to pick out an issue right off the bat. HWinfo is a good way to get that data and in my experience tends to be more accurate than some of the other utilities available. CPU-Z, GPU-Z and Core Temp all have their uses but HWinfo tends to have it all laid out in a more convenient fashion so you can usually see what one sensor is reporting while looking at another instead of having to flip through various tabs that have specific groupings.

After installation, run the utility and when asked, choose "sensors only". The other window options have some use but in most cases everything you need will be located in the sensors window. If you're taking screenshots to post for troubleshooting, it will most likely require taking three screenshots and scrolling down the sensors window between screenshots in order to capture them all.

It is most helpful if you can take a series of HWinfo screenshots at idle, after a cold boot to the desktop. Open HWinfo and wait for all of the Windows startup processes to complete. Usually about four or five minutes should be plenty. Take screenshots of all the HWinfo sensors.

Next, run something demanding like Prime95 version 26.6 or Heaven benchmark. Take another set of screenshots while either of those is running so we can see what the hardware is doing while under a load.

*Download HWinfo


For temperature monitoring only, I feel Core Temp is the most accurate and also offers a quick visual reference for core speed, load and CPU voltage:

*Download Core Temp

"IF" temperature issues are relevant to your problem, especially if this is a build that has been running for a year or more, taking care of the basics first might save everybody involved a lot of time and frustration.

Check the CPU fan heatsink for dust accumulation and blow or clean out as necessary. Avoid using a vacuum if possible as vacuums are known to create static electricity that can, in some cases, zap small components.

Other areas that may benefit from a cleaning include fans, power supply internals, storage and optical drives, the motherboard surfaces and RAM. Keeping the inside of your rig clean is a high priority and should be done on a regular basis using 90 psi or lower compressed air from a compressor or compressed canned air.

Use common sense based on what PSU your compressor is set to. Don't "blast" your motherboard or hardware to pieces. Start from an adequate distance until you can judge what is enough to just get the job done. When using canned air use only short blasts moving from place to place frequently to avoid "frosting" components.
 
Nov 27, 2018
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https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075N132C7/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o07_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
I'll check to see if my gpu heatsink is mounted correctly. I've check my temps while benchmarking it and the temps seem fine and stay at 40 even right before the shut down. I've also built this a week ago so I don't believe there is any dust. For any reference I use Cam to monitor my gpu heat
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Do you have an NZXT product installed, or why are you using CAM? You realize that CAM is one of the buggiest pieces of software out there, right?

I've had to ditch my Hue+ and Grid+ v2 due to how bad the code has become AND because of their phone home practices that agressively gather personal information and send it NZXT. If it is not necessary to use that in order for one or more pieces of hardware to work, I'd get rid of it. I've seen systems that have had to have Windows completely reinstalled due to CAM. More than once.

Use HWinfo, NOT CAM, for monitoring.

HWmonitor, Open hardware monitor, Realtemp, Speccy, Speedfan, Windows utilities, CPU-Z, NZXT CAM and most of the bundled motherboard utilities are often not the best choice as they are not always accurate. Some are actually grossly inaccurate, especially with certain chipsets or specific sensors that for whatever reason they tend to not like or work well with. I've found HWinfo or CoreTemp to be the MOST accurate with the broadest range of chipsets and sensors. They are also almost religiously kept up to date.

CoreTemp is great for just CPU thermals including core temps or distance to TJmax on AMD platforms.

HWinfo is great for pretty much EVERYTHING, including CPU thermals, core loads, core temps, package temps, GPU sensors, HDD and SSD sensors, motherboard chipset and VRM sensor, all of it. Always select the "Sensors only" option when running HWinfo.

In cases where it is relevant and you are seeking help, then in order to help you, it's often necessary to SEE what's going on, in the event one of us can pick something out that seems out of place, or other indicators that just can't be communicated via a text only post. In these cases, posting an image of the HWinfo sensors or something else can be extremely helpful. That may not be the case in YOUR thread, but if it is then the information at the following link will show you how to do that:

*How to post images in Tom's hardware forums



Run HWinfo and look at system voltages and other sensor readings.

Monitoring temperatures, core speeds, voltages, clock ratios and other reported sensor data can often help to pick out an issue right off the bat. HWinfo is a good way to get that data and in my experience tends to be more accurate than some of the other utilities available. CPU-Z, GPU-Z and Core Temp all have their uses but HWinfo tends to have it all laid out in a more convenient fashion so you can usually see what one sensor is reporting while looking at another instead of having to flip through various tabs that have specific groupings.

After installation, run the utility and when asked, choose "sensors only". The other window options have some use but in most cases everything you need will be located in the sensors window. If you're taking screenshots to post for troubleshooting, it will most likely require taking three screenshots and scrolling down the sensors window between screenshots in order to capture them all.

It is most helpful if you can take a series of HWinfo screenshots at idle, after a cold boot to the desktop. Open HWinfo and wait for all of the Windows startup processes to complete. Usually about four or five minutes should be plenty. Take screenshots of all the HWinfo sensors.

Next, run something demanding like Prime95 version 26.6 or Heaven benchmark. Take another set of screenshots while either of those is running so we can see what the hardware is doing while under a load.

*Download HWinfo


For temperature monitoring only, I feel Core Temp is the most accurate and also offers a quick visual reference for core speed, load and CPU voltage:

*Download Core Temp

"IF" temperature issues are relevant to your problem, especially if this is a build that has been running for a year or more, taking care of the basics first might save everybody involved a lot of time and frustration.

Check the CPU fan heatsink for dust accumulation and blow or clean out as necessary. Avoid using a vacuum if possible as vacuums are known to create static electricity that can, in some cases, zap small components.

Other areas that may benefit from a cleaning include fans, power supply internals, storage and optical drives, the motherboard surfaces and RAM. Keeping the inside of your rig clean is a high priority and should be done on a regular basis using 90 psi or lower compressed air from a compressor or compressed canned air.

Use common sense based on what PSU your compressor is set to. Don't "blast" your motherboard or hardware to pieces. Start from an adequate distance until you can judge what is enough to just get the job done. When using canned air use only short blasts moving from place to place frequently to avoid "frosting" components.


Also, it's your CPU heatsink and cooler that I'm most concerned with, not the GPU heatsink. I'm sure the GPU heatsink is fine unless you've had it off the card.

Make sure all fans are running as they should be AND that the three fans, if that is all you have, that came with the case are installed as follows.

Two fans in the front, as intake fans, bringing air INTO the case. Rear fan, as exhaust, taking hot air OUT of the case. If they are not configured that way, then fix it.
 
Nov 27, 2018
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Thanks for the advice. I'll report to you tomorrow on what happens. Quick question though, everytime I want to test my graphics card it shuts off so will doing this hurt it in any way? I don't want to keep doing this because I'm afraid I'll fry my graphics card.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
If the card is doing this, then it is ALREADY damaged. It's not like a hard drive where you want to get as much data off it as possible before it dies entirely. If the card is done, it's done. Running it normally isn't going to change that. Running it under a load isn't going to make anything worse, because it's ALREADY worse.

Honestly, this almost sounds as though you have some bent pins on the CPU and I think it would be a very good idea to remove the CPU cooler, remove the CPU and check for bent pins. If there are not any, then you will probably need to clean the thermal paste off the CPU lid and bottom of the cooler and apply fresh paste. If that cooler came with a thermal "pad" instead of paste, it will probably be borked and need to be removed with a razor blade and then replaced with a good quality thermal paste like Arctic silver 5 or Noctua NT-H1. Unfortunately, you cannot reuse the thermal paste or pad in most cases.

If the thermal pad is intact, you MIGHT be able to reuse it, but it will probably not be as effect as it was originally since it will have already have been smashed down and won't make the same interface between the two surfaces as effectively the second time.
 
Nov 27, 2018
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I just had this problem today suddenly and yesterday the performance was fine. Does the problem have any chance to be related to the power supply being bad?
 
Nov 27, 2018
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I've downloaded HWinfo and I'll give you the details about it but for now I've looked at my event manager and found these 2. https://imgur.com/46wHvQG and https://imgur.com/empXVIN

Edit: Heres a picture of HWinfo when my computer runs normally https://imgur.com/fBaNLOo. I don't know how to save screenshots since when I try running the benchmark since the computer shuts down and I can't really save any screenshots.
 
Nov 27, 2018
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MERGED QUESTION
Question from fakeemail1441 : "Monitor turns off and graphics card fans get really loud."

When I try to play demanding games or benchmark my computer it shuts off and the fans get really loud. I am getting these problems https://i.imgur.com/46wHvQG.png
and https://i.imgur.com/empXVIN.png
My parts are: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/fyYzsZ
and my case is: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075N132C7/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o07_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Any help?
Notes: This happened suddenly and the day before my computer was working just fine.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Check to see if there is a newer motherboard bios available for your board.

Also, while there, check to see if there are newer drivers on the product page for your motherboard for the audio, chipset, storage controller and network drivers. ALL those drivers can have an affect on other hardware or create problems if the older driver versions are not playing nice with your operating system.
 
Nov 27, 2018
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The problem has gotten worse to the fact that it takes a few minutes for the computer to just shut off and die benchmark or not. I can't really download anything because of this.
 
Nov 27, 2018
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Sorry for the late update I had to go somewhere.

I've updated all my drivers but I still get the same problem and now I just got the BSOD. Thanks for your help but I think my computer has gone far from repair at least by me.

 

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