[SOLVED] Monitoring my GPU, what should I make of the numbers?

Aug 22, 2020
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Hello there.

My desktop is extremely noisy in a lot of games, most recently Dying Light which is from 2015, and it becomes unbearable within a couple of minutes.

I bought an RTX 2060 and upgraded my cooling fans not long ago, and this is actually where the noisy issues began (this is also when I started to play heavier games, though, like VR).

This is a screenshot of my GPU monitoring when it was really bad: View: https://imgur.com/a/01vSgnK


I don't have experience with all these numbers, so I have a few questions.

1. Is it normal for a GPU to operate at 100% even in older games?

2. Is it a problem when Current Frequency is higher than Stock Frequency?

3. Is 80+ degrees celcius a problem?

Depending on the answers of these questions, is there something wrong with my GPU so I should go back to the seller? Or what can I do from here?

Best regards.
 

Ferimer

Distinguished
Not at all rude :)

Okay, that last post with the picture really helps me. I do have 2 140mm fans at the front, but don't know where the 120mm original fan is, so I might just buy some new. That's fine, it's inexpensive anyway.

So what do you recommend I do with the three 120mm fan spots? I don't mind filling all three spots.
The back spot will be exhaust fan, right?
I'm sorry if I don't understand your last post completely, but are the two top spots also best used with exhaust fans, thus having 3 exhaust fans all in all?
I wouldn't go with 3 exhaust fans. as you would be just pushing out more and more air than your other components would be needing to suck in to help cool down. Your best option is to just Put 2 for exhaust and 2 for intake. Keep the Top exhaust above the CPU (left side) to just allow for more hot air to be blows out top
 
1: Totally depends on how the games are made - like if there is no upper fps limit, then it may go all up. It also depend on the software used to measure and how reliable that result are. Does other program say the same?

2: Have you overclocked the card yourself?

3: No, it can handle that. You should rather see if there is enough cooling in the cabinet as a whole. If all temperatures are high, you may have bad air flow or lot of dust inside.

However you don't tell the nature of the "noise". If it comes from the new cooling fan, you should see if there are some object (a wire ?) that is touching the fan blades.
 
Aug 22, 2020
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1: Totally depends on how the games are made - like if there is no upper fps limit, then it may go all up. It also depend on the software used to measure and how reliable that result are. Does other program say the same?

2: Have you overclocked the card yourself?

3: No, it can handle that. You should rather see if there is enough cooling in the cabinet as a whole. If all temperatures are high, you may have bad air flow or lot of dust inside.

However you don't tell the nature of the "noise". If it comes from the new cooling fan, you should see if there are some object (a wire ?) that is touching the fan blades.
1: I have tried other programs in the past and they told the same.

2: No, it was overclocked from the beginning. I'm too inexperienced with hardware to dare try these things myself. A friend of mine said that there might be a problem with the overclocking which maybe can be solved from BIOS. He comes by tomorrow to look at it.

3: Good to know. My CPU is at 50-60 degrees C, and doesn't look like other temperatures increases.

I will take a look in the cabinet later and check while a game is running. It's almost silent right now and is most of the time.
I'm just curious since these troubles began right as I installed the new GPU, although the noise did appear to be diminished when I replaced the old cooling fan in front of the cabinet and installed a second one too.
 
1 - You may want to try another PGU driver, even an older one if you have the newest. Maybe the older games just doesn't play along with the newest driver. Just give it a try (remember to uninstall current driver first).

2 - I'd recommend to not fiddling with bios right now. Also, overclocking of GPU is not done from within bios menu. You may not want to have a friend looking into it if he doesn't know that.
A GPU that is overclocked by factory should also be tested before shipped out to resellers, so unless it is my years old, it's unlikely that is the issue.

HOWEVER - If you have modified the card in some mysterious ways, that can cause the cooling to behave different - and that can actually cause the GPU to limit itself. Also when you have an overclocked version, it make sense because the card will get more sensitive to changes for the cooling.

3 - What about GPU temperature?
 

Zerk2012

Titan
Ambassador
Hello there.

My desktop is extremely noisy in a lot of games, most recently Dying Light which is from 2015, and it becomes unbearable within a couple of minutes.

I bought an RTX 2060 and upgraded my cooling fans not long ago, and this is actually where the noisy issues began (this is also when I started to play heavier games, though, like VR).

This is a screenshot of my GPU monitoring when it was really bad: View: https://imgur.com/a/01vSgnK


I don't have experience with all these numbers, so I have a few questions.

1. Is it normal for a GPU to operate at 100% even in older games?

2. Is it a problem when Current Frequency is higher than Stock Frequency?

3. Is 80+ degrees celcius a problem?

Depending on the answers of these questions, is there something wrong with my GPU so I should go back to the seller? Or what can I do from here?

Best regards.
1. Your video card will do all it can, you might can limit your FPS in the game menu, or monitor depending on the one you have. What monitor are you using?

2. Most cards have a stock frequency and a boost frequency so that is normal.

3. I would rather mine be under 80C but 81 is not bad.
 
Reactions: Grobe

geofelt

Titan
1 A gpu will run as hard as it is driven. That is normal.

2 Many graphics cards are binned and will be factory overclocked to run at higher than stock performance. No problem there.

3 80c. seems to be a common target temperature. Graphics cards run hot, but they are designed to do so.

You indicated that you upgraded your cooling fans.
What fans are we talking about? GPU, case, or cpu?

With a gpu fan running at 2800 RPM, it will be noisy.

What is your case and fan arrangement?
There should be sufficient airflow directed to the graphics card to let the cooling fans do their job efficiently.

What is your cpu and cpu cooler?

Try taking the case covers off.
If that helps a lot, look to case cooling solutions.
 
Aug 22, 2020
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1 - You may want to try another PGU driver, even an older one if you have the newest. Maybe the older games just doesn't play along with the newest driver. Just give it a try (remember to uninstall current driver first).

2 - I'd recommend to not fiddling with bios right now. Also, overclocking of GPU is not done from within bios menu. You may not want to have a friend looking into it if he doesn't know that.
A GPU that is overclocked by factory should also be tested before shipped out to resellers, so unless it is my years old, it's unlikely that is the issue.

HOWEVER - If you have modified the card in some mysterious ways, that can cause the cooling to behave different - and that can actually cause the GPU to limit itself. Also when you have an overclocked version, it make sense because the card will get more sensitive to changes for the cooling.

3 - What about GPU temperature?
1. The thing is, this has been going on since I bought the GPU, but I have played some games that don't have this issue so it hasn't been that big a problem, but now it annoys me. So I've had many different drivers, and still it differs from game to game.

2. He only said that there might be something in the BIOS, not that he definitely will do something. I trust that he won't do anything unless he's sure.
It's an RTX 2060, so it should be pretty new.

I haven't modified anything myself.

Is it possible to turn off overclocking, disable it or something, to see if that works?

3. GPU temp. is at 80-81 degrees C when at the highest I've seen before stopping my game.
 
Aug 22, 2020
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1. Your video card will do all it can, you might can limit your FPS in the game menu, or monitor depending on the one you have. What monitor are you using?

2. Most cards have a stock frequency and a boost frequency so that is normal.

3. I would rather mine be under 80C but 81 is not bad.
1. That's a really god question. It's 5 years old, so can't really remember. I know it has the 144hz possibility, but not much else. And I can't find the receipt.

2. Cool, thanks.

3. Okay, great. That's good to hear :)
 

Ferimer

Distinguished
1. The thing is, this has been going on since I bought the GPU, but I have played some games that don't have this issue so it hasn't been that big a problem, but now it annoys me. So I've had many different drivers, and still it differs from game to game.

2. He only said that there might be something in the BIOS, not that he definitely will do something. I trust that he won't do anything unless he's sure.
It's an RTX 2060, so it should be pretty new.

I haven't modified anything myself.

Is it possible to turn off overclocking, disable it or something, to see if that works?

3. GPU temp. is at 80-81 degrees C when at the highest I've seen before stopping my game.
YOu can download an app called MSI afterburner. You can then adjust fan speed settings within it to make it less quiet. the fans are ramping up so fast because it's trying to cool the GPU.
 
Aug 22, 2020
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1 A gpu will run as hard as it is driven. That is normal.

2 Many graphics cards are binned and will be factory overclocked to run at higher than stock performance. No problem there.

3 80c. seems to be a common target temperature. Graphics cards run hot, but they are designed to do so.

You indicated that you upgraded your cooling fans.
What fans are we talking about? GPU, case, or cpu?

With a gpu fan running at 2800 RPM, it will be noisy.

What is your case and fan arrangement?
There should be sufficient airflow directed to the graphics card to let the cooling fans do their job efficiently.

What is your cpu and cpu cooler?

Try taking the case covers off.
If that helps a lot, look to case cooling solutions.
1. 2. 3.: Thanks for answers :)

I upgraded the fans in front of the case.

Fan arrangement is 2 at the front, and then stock fans at CPU, GPU and powersource.

My CPU is i5 6600K. I don't know what fan it has. I'm sorry I'm hard to help, but I'm really not knowledgeable about hardware yet.

I'll try and take the cover off. I read that you shouldn't do that because it would give a worse airflow, but I'll try and see what I get tonight.
 

geofelt

Titan
By taking the side cover off and directing a house fan at the innards, you are forcing all sorts of cooling air into the case where it will let the cpu and gpu coolers work their best.
If that helps much, then look at improving your case airflow. Particularly improving the front intakes.
What is the make/model of your case?
 

Ferimer

Distinguished
1. 2. 3.: Thanks for answers :)

I upgraded the fans in front of the case.

Fan arrangement is 2 at the front, and then stock fans at CPU, GPU and powersource.

My CPU is i5 6600K. I don't know what fan it has. I'm sorry I'm hard to help, but I'm really not knowledgeable about hardware yet.

I'll try and take the cover off. I read that you shouldn't do that because it would give a worse airflow, but I'll try and see what I get tonight.
Do you not have exhaust fans?
 
Aug 22, 2020
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By taking the side cover off and directing a house fan at the innards, you are forcing all sorts of cooling air into the case where it will let the cpu and gpu coolers work their best.
If that helps much, then look at improving your case airflow. Particularly improving the front intakes.
What is the make/model of your case?
I don't have a house fan, unfortunately. I must be able to borrow one from a neighbour.
The case is a Corsair Carbide SPEC: View: https://imgur.com/a/t2GbTWB
 

Ferimer

Distinguished
Nope, no exhaust fans. Although, I see that my case has room for one on the back.
I guess it would be a good idea to install one.
Yes it would. You need to exhaust all the hot air that is spewing from you components. You are just pumping in Cool air and that create a certain pressure within the case. NOw with no fans to exhaust you are just constantly moving the air within the case and it has nowhere to go. MInd you some may be pushed it from the vent that is open but it wont be enough to see any decrease in high temps. Get a fan for exhaust and you will see a change.
 
Aug 22, 2020
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Yes it would. You need to exhaust all the hot air that is spewing from you components. You are just pumping in Cool air and that create a certain pressure within the case. NOw with no fans to exhaust you are just constantly moving the air within the case and it has nowhere to go. MInd you some may be pushed it from the vent that is open but it wont be enough to see any decrease in high temps. Get a fan for exhaust and you will see a change.
I seriously value your answer here. It makes sense and I will buy an extra fan!
Thank you.
 

Ferimer

Distinguished
I seriously value your answer here. It makes sense and I will buy an extra fan!
Thank you.
Not a problem whatsoever. glad we could help. Try not to spare too much expense. look for a fan that has decent RPM capabilities that may also be a bit quieter as it increases in RPM. Adjust it in the BIOS settings too if you can so that the rear exhaust fan you have will run at say maybe 1150RPM to 1250RPM constantly so that it pushes the air out faster. Also if my last post came off rude or anything that wasn't my intention was just trying to give you the best information possible.
 

Ferimer

Distinguished
I seriously value your answer here. It makes sense and I will buy an extra fan!
Thank you.
Also looking at your Case i can see you have space for two exhaust fans up top. What you can do is put one Exhaust fan on the Rear and another one for exhaust on top (left side) should sit above the CPU


Edit: Now what that will do is create a neutral pressure within your case. which is better than having a 0 exhaust. NOw you can choose to buy 2x140mm fans for your front and if you have the 120mm at the front use them for the rear and top exhaust that will give you a slight positive pressure due to the larger fans pushing in more air at a lower speed thus reducing noise. just some ideas to think about.
 
Aug 22, 2020
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Not a problem whatsoever. glad we could help. Try not to spare too much expense. look for a fan that has decent RPM capabilities that may also be a bit quieter as it increases in RPM. Adjust it in the BIOS settings too if you can so that the rear exhaust fan you have will run at say maybe 1150RPM to 1250RPM constantly so that it pushes the air out faster. Also if my last post came off rude or anything that wasn't my intention was just trying to give you the best information possible.
Not at all rude :)

Okay, that last post with the picture really helps me. I do have 2 140mm fans at the front, but don't know where the 120mm original fan is, so I might just buy some new. That's fine, it's inexpensive anyway.

So what do you recommend I do with the three 120mm fan spots? I don't mind filling all three spots.
The back spot will be exhaust fan, right?
I'm sorry if I don't understand your last post completely, but are the two top spots also best used with exhaust fans, thus having 3 exhaust fans all in all?
 

Ferimer

Distinguished
Not at all rude :)

Okay, that last post with the picture really helps me. I do have 2 140mm fans at the front, but don't know where the 120mm original fan is, so I might just buy some new. That's fine, it's inexpensive anyway.

So what do you recommend I do with the three 120mm fan spots? I don't mind filling all three spots.
The back spot will be exhaust fan, right?
I'm sorry if I don't understand your last post completely, but are the two top spots also best used with exhaust fans, thus having 3 exhaust fans all in all?
I wouldn't go with 3 exhaust fans. as you would be just pushing out more and more air than your other components would be needing to suck in to help cool down. Your best option is to just Put 2 for exhaust and 2 for intake. Keep the Top exhaust above the CPU (left side) to just allow for more hot air to be blows out top
 
Aug 22, 2020
10
0
10
0
I wouldn't go with 3 exhaust fans. as you would be just pushing out more and more air than your other components would be needing to suck in to help cool down. Your best option is to just Put 2 for exhaust and 2 for intake. Keep the Top exhaust above the CPU (left side) to just allow for more hot air to be blows out top
Great. I will get two exhaust fans and see how it all plays out. Thank you for your time :)
 

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