More USB Type-C Demos, Still Few Actual Products

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InvalidError

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People buying into Type-C expecting full support for the 3.1 specification will remain confused and frustrated for the foreseeable future since few devices actually need to go beyond the basic 3.0 spec and many will likely end up doing USB1.x/2.0 over Type-C.
 

Dan414

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Isn't the idea of Type C that these "hubs" are actually built into the monitor? Power goes into the monitor, and drives or mice or whatever go to the monitor and draw through it, along with the laptop?
 

Larry Litmanen

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People buying into Type-C expecting full support for the 3.1 specification will remain confused and frustrated for the foreseeable future since few devices actually need to go beyond the basic 3.0 spec and many will likely end up doing USB1.x/2.0 over Type-C.
It's like any technology out there, people want the latest and want to be future proof. Few years ago i got a 1080P TV when it wasn't even that widely used. I still use the same TV and every channel is 1080P now.

Many people out there are not into tech all that much and are on the budget, my GF uses a Windows XP laptop daily, so if you know you will use a product for 5+ years it is nice to be relatively future ready.
 

Quixit

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Isn't the idea of Type C that these "hubs" are actually built into the monitor? Power goes into the monitor, and drives or mice or whatever go to the monitor and draw through it, along with the laptop?
They can be, that's the beautify of it, it's very flexible.
 

agnickolov

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Microsoft's mobile Continuum is just around the corner with the upcoming Lumia phones the first of hopefully many true computer-in-a-phone-s fully utilizing USB 3.1.
 

scolaner

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Isn't the idea of Type C that these "hubs" are actually built into the monitor? Power goes into the monitor, and drives or mice or whatever go to the monitor and draw through it, along with the laptop?
That's one way of doing it, yes. It would also make sense to use a standalone hub.

Look, these things are all part of a technology transition. I would expect that most monitors built after X date would have this sort of "hub" built right in. But many of us will be using older monitors for years, and so we'd need a standalone (or monitor rear-mounted hub).

I can see pros and cons of various ways of doing this. But, as I said in the piece, we still can't buy...anything, really.
 
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