Question Motherboard and static electricity

Mar 1, 2019
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I am going to be replacing my motherboard cpu and ram and wanted to ask a few questions.



1. I got one of those static elictricity wrist wraps that has a metal clip on the other end and I heard that I am supposed to plug it on a bare metal part of the power supply, have the power supply on 0/off and have the power supply plugged into the wall, do I have everything correct? My power supply is all black, will it still work through the paint?



2. I have a tile floor, should I use a flat piece of cardboard box between the floor and the components or straight to on the floor?



3. In regards to static electricity should I be with shoes on or barefoot?
 
Mar 1, 2019
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Also is it okay to use a screw driver with a magnetic tip to install a motherboard into a case? And other components as well?
 
I am going to be replacing my motherboard cpu and ram and wanted to ask a few questions.



1. I got one of those static elictricity wrist wraps that has a metal clip on the other end and I heard that I am supposed to plug it on a bare metal part of the power supply, have the power supply on 0/off and have the power supply plugged into the wall, do I have everything correct? My power supply is all black, will it still work through the paint?



2. I have a tile floor, should I use a flat piece of cardboard box between the floor and the components or straight to on the floor?



3. In regards to static electricity should I be with shoes on or barefoot?
With regards to electrostatic discharge hazards presented to these DIY computer kit parts we buy.... I always refer people to the HUGE number of crazy videos on youtube where people unbox and build. They almost all handling the board for the camera with bare hands, shuffling it across their table and rubbing it against their clothes.

Mfr's anticipate their customer base and have taken pains to build in protections. If they didn't we'd hear a lot more from those youtube reviewers of DOA components. Which we we don't. But I don't mean to suggest ignore some simple precautions though.

Leave the parts in their packaging until you're at the computer to install them. You can almost always see everything you need to see through the clear or smoky tint.

Have the computer case open and TOUCH it before sticking your hand inside the package to remove the part...touching the case neutralizes the charge on your body. It doesn't really matter that it's coated with paint, but if it concerns you then touch one of the screws or rivets that makes metal to metal contact.

I never use a ground strap but I always keep in frequent contact with the metal components of the computer case (if you have one just clip it to one of the case screws somewhere). Once the part is in my hand I do not move my feet until it's been located in the case...which I'm contacting with my hand or forearm to keep charges neutralized. This is an easy thing to do and the reason why a wrist strap is superfluous.

DO NOT plug anything into the mains until you're ready to power up the system: that presents a whole set of different safety hazards.

NEVER EVER EVER walk about the room with a component in your hand that is NOT in the mfr's packaging.
 
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Mar 1, 2019
8
0
10
0
With regards to electrostatic discharge hazards presented to these DIY computer kit parts we buy.... I always refer people to the HUGE number of crazy videos on youtube where people unbox and build. They almost all handling the board for the camera with bare hands, shuffling it across their table and rubbing it against their clothes.

Mfr's anticipate their customer base and have taken pains to build in protections. If they didn't we'd hear a lot more from those youtube reviewers of DOA components. Which we we don't. But I don't mean to suggest ignore some simple precautions though.

Leave the parts in their packaging until you're at the computer to install them. You can almost always see everything you need to see through the clear or smoky tint.

Have the computer case open and TOUCH it before sticking your hand inside the package to remove the part...touching the case neutralizes the charge on your body. It doesn't really matter that it's coated with paint, but if it concerns you then touch one of the screws or rivets that makes metal to metal contact.

I never use a ground strap but I always keep in frequent contact with the metal components of the computer case (if you have one just clip it to one of the case screws somewhere). Once the part is in my hand I do not move my feet until it's been located in the case...which I'm contacting with my hand or forearm to keep charges neutralized. This is an easy thing to do and the reason why a wrist strap is superfluous.

DO NOT plug anything into the mains until you're ready to power up the system: that presents a whole set of different safety hazards.

NEVER EVER EVER walk about the room with a component in your hand that is NOT in the mfr's packaging.
What is a main, when you said do not plug anything into the mains until your ready to power up the system?
 
Maybe I am misunderstanding something, but I read in multiple places that when you are building, or working on your pc, you should have the 3 prong plunged into the wall outlet, and set the back of your power supply to 0, so any static electricity goes into the ground.
That's a misunderstanding and presents very real safety hazards since you shouldn't work on anything that has wall outlet voltage applied (especially if you lack thorough understanding of how it all functions and interconnects). You don't have to ground charges, you only have to neutralize charges: that is making everything of an equal potential.

That's what touching the case does, it makes your body the same potential as the case (and everything inside of it). And when you hold the bag with the part any charge on the bag (and therefore the part inside it) is also neutralized to the same potential as your body and the case. So it's now safe to reach inside and pull the part out to fit inside the case.

What's really, really bad is to neutralize parts with a super-quick 'shock' kind of discharge: the one where you get zapped. That's why the bag is important: it allows charges to slowly neutralize (several dozens of milliseconds vs. nanoseconds) instead of super fast with a 'zap'.
 

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