Motherboard BIOS reverted itself to previous version!

TOMJ79

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Dec 11, 2015
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Is it possible for a motherboard to revert back to an earlier version of the BIOS on it's own?

I installed Windows 10 in UEFI mode on my 160GB SSD with a 1TB HDD for storage.
Once I booted into the BIOS I realized I made a mistake and that it was in RAID mode instead of AHCI. I changed it. Which I figured I would get boot device not found error...but I NEVER that or a HDMI signal from MOBO port or PCIe Video card port. With a constant scroll of numbers from the mobo error code LCD display never ending to fast to read... I decided to reset CMOS, tried again nothing, I unplugged the HDD with PC off. Nothing.
Finally it stayed on some codes, but still no signal...

Gigabyte
(32)CPU PEI initialization.
(62)Initialization of the PCH runtime services.
(A6)Detect and install all currently connected SCSI devices.

The last one made sense so I plugged the HDD back in and got a repair prompt. Restarted and repaired it, wiping all files. I thought it was all good till I went into my BIOS and it was back on F7!
I updated to F8 as soon as I bought the board back in 2015!

http://www.gigabyte.us/products/product-page.aspx?pid=4952#bios
I did I swear I am not on drugs ...

Has anyone ever encountered this ?
Is this a sign of a defective motherboard? Thanks

MB-Gigabyte G1.Sniper Z97
CPU-i5-4590
GPU-PNY ELR8 GTX 960
PSU-Thermaltake SP-650P
 
Your motherboard has dual BIOS, which means it has a spare BIOS chip it uses to fix the main BIOS if it becomes corrupted. Naturally, that second BIOS chip contains whatever BIOS version the board was manufactured with, so if your main BIOS was corrupted the board could have repaired it, and thus reverted it to an older version. A bit inconvenient but I'd say it's preferable to permanently corrupted BIOS :p
 
Your motherboard has dual BIOS, which means it has a spare BIOS chip it uses to fix the main BIOS if it becomes corrupted. Naturally, that second BIOS chip contains whatever BIOS version the board was manufactured with, so if your main BIOS was corrupted the board could have repaired it, and thus reverted it to an older version. A bit inconvenient but I'd say it's preferable to permanently corrupted BIOS :p
 

TOMJ79

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Dec 11, 2015
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What you say makes perfect sense http://imgur.com/BZWvlDu but this manual has confused me, are these switches related to the auto repair BIOS? Or separate...I was under the impression if the 1st BIOS failed I would have to manually flip this switch to boot from the second one...why do I have these switches if it is automatic? http://imgur.com/AOU41xz

Does that make a total of 3 bios? I originally thought the switch was for installing a secondary operating system on the other BIOS /facepalm Thanks for your reply, Sir

 
The first BIOS switch is so that you can still boot off the backup BIOS in case the automatic repair feature doesn't kick in (or if you have some issue with a new BIOS version on the main BIOS). The second one is so that you can disable this feature entirely.

Also, your operating system is installed on your SSD, not "on the BIOS". What the BIOS does is tell everything on the motherboard how to function (e.g. what clockspeed the CPU and RAM should run at, how much voltage should go to them).
 

TOMJ79

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Dec 11, 2015
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Much obliged!
 

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