Motherboard choice and do I need a CPU cooler (not stock).

Rayzer_116

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Hi I'm trying to build my first PC and I'm not sure if I need a aftermarket CPU cooler or not. I'm getting a Xeon E3-1231v3 and I'm using the rig for AAA gaming and CAD/Blender work.

Also I'm not sure what motherboard to get, this is the build: http://au.pcpartpicker.com/p/ZqT8cf
I was thinking a SATA express port for my SSD (not sure if it improves performance) also I won't be overclocking and I may crossfire/SLI.

Thanks
 
That 850 EVO doesn't support SATA Express. In fact I'm not sure that any drives do yet. Direct to PCIe seems to be the way of the future. I suspect SATA express will just die out... though that's just my guess.

Aftermarket cooler will be quieter and lower temps, but the stock cooler is absolutely fine IMHO. Those Xeon's run well within spec with not a lot of heat, so the cooler doesn't have to work all that hard.
 

Rayzer_116

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That seems dumb that they have SATA express mobo's with nothing to connect them to. Also the ASUS Maximus VII Ranger looks like a really good board (a bit expensive) but I'm willing to get it if its worth it.
 


Yeah, it is a little strange I guess. But if you think about it, if an SSD has an interface that very few people have, it won't sell well at all. On the other hand, for the motherboard it's a "feature", which looks good on a spec sheet and makes people think it might come in handy down the track. It's early days for SATA express and M.2/U.2 PCIe storage, and it makes perfect sense for motherboards to include them as sort of future oriented features before there's enough market demand for companies to start releasing SSDs the require them.

Just remember that motherboards have no impact on performance whatsoever. It's ALL about the features. More expensive motherboards offer things like:
- better quality power delivery for higher overclocks (completely irrelevant for you with your locked CPU)
- more connectivity such as USB 3.1, thunderbolt, more SATA ports, M.2, etc
- better quality sound or network options (wireless, dual NICs)
- Greater PCIe flexibility (some give you 2 x8 slots which allow for SLI, some even include a PLX chip to split PCIe lanes for even more flexibility and open up triple or quad GPU options)
But in reality, the vast majority of users really just need a few SATA ports for an SSD, a HDD or two and an optical drive and enough USB ports for their needs... which even the cheapest of motherboards can handle.

If you have particular needs that demand the features on higher end motherboards then for sure spend the money, but if you have 'normal' needs and you want the best performance for you money... don't sink it into a motherboard. If you have budget left I'd be looking to upgrade the video card not get a more expensive motherboard (unless, as I noted above, you have a need for particular features which require a higher end board).
 
SATA Express was a concept much touted in mid-2014. Drives such as the Asus Hyper Express, (The world's first 10Gbit/s SATA Express device!), seem to have fallen by the wayside and are nowhere found for sale. It seems a problem with performance after resuming from sleep was never remedied.
https://www.asus.com/Motherboard-Accessories/Hyper_Express/
 

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