Motherboard for ryzen 2600

Nov 3, 2018
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Hi. I ordered a PC set with Ryzen 2600 with Fera 3 cooler and MSI Mortar B450M with the fact that I would overclock the CPU in the future. The question is: Is it good deal? Is there not only a few percent increase in performance? I do not know, If it isn't a waste of money And what board is better? MSI Mortar b450m or ASUS TUF Gaming PRO B450M (better audio) or the cheaper version of the ASRock Pro4 B450M (it is innovation). I need mATX. If you look at a few videos on youtube, they say that it will not pay off (I mean overclocking). I'm worried about that. I look at this from this perspective as well. If the new 8j Ryzeny were followed in order to upgrade. What would you recommend? Thank you very much.
 


If you are concerned about overclocking performance avoid the ASUS Tuf. The B450M Mortar and the Asrock B450m Pro4 are both very good overclockers (for mATX boards) because they have strong VRM's that have large, well finned heatsinks and so will run cool and keep voltage stable for the CPU.

It's not just the end frequency as you may get any of the boards (including the TUF) to overclock to your CPU's potential, say, 4.1Ghz for a 2600. But the TUF's VRM's will overheat under heavy loads and start throttling the CPU to cool off. The Mortar and Pro4, with more FET's and bigger heatsinks, are unlikely to because they run so much cooler.

There are some negatives though: the Mortar doesn't have offset voltage adjustment for instance. That's really only important if you're overclocking a 2600X CPU using PBO. A 2600 CPU is better to overclock conventionally since it doesn't have XFR-2.

If super-quiet, low noise floor, audio is important it may over-rule overclocking potential. That's something that depends on how you use your system.

 
Nov 3, 2018
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Thank you very much for your answer. I ordered a report, but I chose Mortar board instead of Asrock. Well, so I read differently from foreign forums and I have more questions than answers and worries. I just took Mortar because of the big cooler and the better quality of the used MOSFETs (so according to what I heard) because I thought that what the clocking of the CPU and the future is better, but then I worked on this forum where they are just criticizing this the shape of the cooler and call it a piece of sheet metal that does not deliver heat well than a cooler with high-quality ribbing, and in more detail it argues with different views and most of them are staying (which made me nervous) ... Here: https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/951209-msi-claims-larger-heatsinks-are-better. Well, before that, I read this article, where they are testing the overclocking of Ryzen 7 2700X on this board and they are very praise its cooling. Here it is: https://bit-tech.net/reviews/tech/motherboards/msi-b450m- mortar-review (8). Well ... the question now sounds. Who is right? Who do I trust? I just have to take that Asrock, what did you recommend to me? Is a better efficient smaller radiator and larger ribbing that Asrock definitely has? Is Asrock better than other B450m? I do not want to buy a board (MSI) just because of the brand. Thank you very much for your answer.
 
If they've left you any doubts about the Mortar go take a look at this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zSqhVlpgw3U

The heatsink is truly massive, nicely finned. And the FET's are quite capable. If you wonder, Buildzoid (the guy in the video) is a competitive overclocker and he picks his boards intending to see how far he can go with it. He's very critical and considers anything that isn't good enough for his purposes 'crap'. His VRM walkthrough is quite exhaustive compared to anything else you'll see, even if it is mostly theoretical.

The Asrock B450m Pro4 has had a lot of praise about it's VRM and overclocking potential, I wouldn't want to say either one is exactly 'better'. And besides, for most common purposes you might just consider them pretty much equals if your concern is a 24/7 overclock since your CPU will be the most likely limiter for that. Their differences might only come out if you're trying for some benchmark records or something like that.

What appealed to me are the Mortar's features, in particular the BIOS FlashBack button on back and the 2nd NVME socket. The 2nd NVME is very nice as you can much more easily upgrade your NVME system drive by cloning it to the new one instead of having to reinstall everything from scratch. I also really liked the MSI BIOS, which is intuitive and really easy to navigate. Asrock's BIOS is clunky with some important adjustments deep in nested menus.

 
Nov 3, 2018
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What i first saw on link what you posted from youtube are critic comments about mortar, but i will look at it. Thank you. :(
 


The SOC isn't heavily loaded for any but APU processors, a 2200g and a 2400g. For any other Ryzen processors the SOC isn't going to get hot at all so heatsinking on the FET's are irrelevant. The SOC powers the GPU part of those processors.

So you have a 2600 processor coming, which won't be helped at all with heatsinking on the SOC no matter how much you overclock CPU or memory. Just keep that in mind.
 
Nov 3, 2018
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I ask question on forum linustechtips.com about their negative reaction about the VRM of Mortar and they gave me this answer:
We only said it's bad because back then we havent seen the sides of the MSI new heatsink, and MSI's past record on this is terrible. However it turns out that there are fins hidden behind the big flat plate on the top, which means it does work.
I´m calmer.
 


Check out that video i linked before. He shows you the heatsink about 1:10 or so
 

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