[SOLVED] Motherboard, little upsie on a few transitors/resitors

Apr 11, 2019
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Hi,
I just tried to unseat my GPU in a very small Case and used a screwdriver (very bad idea), as I forced the screwdriver down, I lost focus and it ran over a part of my motherboard
Roughly 3 Transistors/Resitors got loose, thrashed
My Motherboard is MPG Z390m Gaming Edge Ac from MSI
Any idea of what is broken?
My PC still runs fine without problems however I'm worried nonetheless
 
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So I guess I just got pretty lucky with what I scratched since it doesn't seem to affect anything.
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That happens very often if the scratch doesn't cut traces to memory or PCIe slots. Resistors and cap's are often used in circuits for functions based more on principle than actual need.

But there is some things you should be aware of: they are also often used to make the active components in the circuit function within safe operating range. What that means is the circuit will continue to function but possibly not with as long a life as originally designed. So it may fail early...maybe in the next few weeks, maybe in the next few years, so maybe 5 year life instead of 20 or 30 years. It's just too hard to say.

And one last thing to note is OnSemi (the ON inside a circle is their trademark) makes a lot of components for DC to DC converters, circuits used all over modern motherboards. I'm not sure that's what that other IC is but if it is, for instance, a custom buck convertor and some of those resistors are in the circuit how it affects it's voltage output is unknown at this point. So just be aware of what I said earlier: you might have a bit of a 'time bomb', that could go at anytime. Not trying to scare you, just keep you informed.
 
Being you aren't having any problems at the moment, I would continue to run and see what happens.

Those components may be part of a circuit you don't ever use.

If they are, you may never see an issue.

If they aren't....you might find out what circuit they're for.

I think that repairing it is going to be pretty tough (not knowing the values of the components) as well as the solder job itself.
 
Reactions: Lozrantekh
Apr 11, 2019
15
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Thanks for the answer, I know I currently should do nothing and I probably will.
However there may be someone that can tell me what this circuit may be for so that I don't do a stupid and exactly use this circuit at some point damaging something else in the process.
However thanks or the consideration

PS. I added a picture to show where exactly the damaged parts are
 
Thanks for the answer, I know I currently should do nothing and I probably will.
However there may be someone that can tell me what this circuit may be for so that I don't do a stupid and exactly use this circuit at some point damaging something else in the process.
However thanks or the consideration

PS. I added a picture to show where exactly the damaged parts are
One of those IC's is a PCIe switch...probably used to switch PCIe lanes between PCIe slots and other functions as you install or remove devices.

But the chip resistor that's hanging out on the leads of that IC (should take it off of there if you haven't yet, BTW), and the one down lower, may be associated with something else. The picture really isn't that clear to see what.
 
Reactions: Lozrantekh
Apr 11, 2019
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Will remove these then, though it wouldn't hurt to just leave them be for now.
Also does that mean I shouldn't switch hardware that often anymore or at all?
And thanks btw.
It's between JUSBC1 and the bottom of the 4th RAM slot I highlighted and I realized the thing seems to still seems to be somewhat connected, very roughly though.

PS I added a clearer Picture of the second chip.
 
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Also does that mean I shouldn't switch hardware that often anymore or at all?
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I got the numbers...just can't find what they cross to on the ONSemi web site anywhere; it may be a custom IC. The curious thing though is I got a hit for a WiFi circuit for a Gigabyte WiFi motherboard even though the numbers didn't match that well... does your WiFi work?

I wouldn't say you SHOULDN'T switch around hardware... but if you do you may find a slot, or SATA port, or USB port (or whatever else works off PCIe on your motherboard) that doesn't work, or worse works erratically.

But if all the devices you use work that's great, I'd just not wait around getting those parts either removed or lifted up so they can't short to anything else. That one resistor laying across the IC leads just seems to me another accident waiting to happen.
 
Reactions: Lozrantekh
Apr 11, 2019
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I'd just not wait around getting those parts either removed or lifted up so they can't short to anything else. That one resistor laying across the IC leads just seems to me another accident waiting to happen.
I removed the small part on the IC, the other I left where it was since it seems to somewhat stick to the board, so it doesn't seem to be completely shredded.

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The curious thing though is I got a hit for a WiFi circuit for a Gigabyte WiFi motherboard even though the numbers didn't match that well... does your WiFi work?
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I just tried it and yeah, it is a bit up and down slope like always but it doesn't abruptly stop or crash at a heavy load like downloading a game through steam (70mb/s downpour), pretty similar to my lan connection, just that it wiggles a little bit more.
So I doubt that it directly affects my Wifi-Card, interesting though.

Also would you recommend using my Motherboards USB-ports, the backports, since they are further from the damaged parts?
 
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Also would you recommend using my Motherboards USB-ports, the backports, since they are further from the damaged parts?
You can give 'em a try if just to see if they work; probably better to know now than later when it frustrates you when you go to use one after forgetting about this. If you can move your GPU to another slot try that too if curious enough.

Or just use it as it is and consider yourself lucky.
 
Reactions: Lozrantekh
Apr 11, 2019
15
1
15
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Both USB front ports as well as the backports work.
The second slot can't be used or at least probably never will be.
The Motherboard is microATX and my Case is microATX with a Power Supply tray, while my GPU is a 3 Slot card.
So I guess I just got pretty lucky with what I scratched since it doesn't seem to affect anything.

However if anyone recognizes the second Chip that I somewhat damaged I would like it if you could tell me for what it is.
(The "ON N87N 1004 GAA1836G")
 
Last edited:
...
So I guess I just got pretty lucky with what I scratched since it doesn't seem to affect anything.
...
That happens very often if the scratch doesn't cut traces to memory or PCIe slots. Resistors and cap's are often used in circuits for functions based more on principle than actual need.

But there is some things you should be aware of: they are also often used to make the active components in the circuit function within safe operating range. What that means is the circuit will continue to function but possibly not with as long a life as originally designed. So it may fail early...maybe in the next few weeks, maybe in the next few years, so maybe 5 year life instead of 20 or 30 years. It's just too hard to say.

And one last thing to note is OnSemi (the ON inside a circle is their trademark) makes a lot of components for DC to DC converters, circuits used all over modern motherboards. I'm not sure that's what that other IC is but if it is, for instance, a custom buck convertor and some of those resistors are in the circuit how it affects it's voltage output is unknown at this point. So just be aware of what I said earlier: you might have a bit of a 'time bomb', that could go at anytime. Not trying to scare you, just keep you informed.
 
Apr 11, 2019
15
1
15
0
Yeah, I will just hope that it at least lasts 2 years or so.
Though I believe, or at least hope that I haven't hit something tremendously important.
 

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