Question Motherboard stays stuck in BIOS menu and cannot find boot device. What to do ?

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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
There should be instructions on updating the BIOS on the product page.

Usually, you would need to use a different computer to download the new BIOS firmware image, then put it on a flash drive, then insert the flash drive in one of the USB ports on the back of the motherboard and then go into the BIOS and update using the built in BIOS update utility in the BIOS.

You want to be sure to read the BIOS update instructions on the product page so you know what you are doing and don't brick the motherboard because you tried doing something different or because you tried to stop it while it was updating.
 
Feb 19, 2020
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There should be instructions on updating the BIOS on the product page.

Usually, you would need to use a different computer to download the new BIOS firmware image, then put it on a flash drive, then insert the flash drive in one of the USB ports on the back of the motherboard and then go into the BIOS and update using the built in BIOS update utility in the BIOS.

You want to be sure to read the BIOS update instructions on the product page so you know what you are doing and don't brick the motherboard because you tried doing something different or because you tried to stop it while it was updating.
I have updated the BIOS then insert the the flash drive contain Windows Installation to the back panel, select the only unpartitioned Drive in the Windows Installation BUT it still showing the same problem saying :"We couldn't install Windows in the location you chose. Please check your media drive . Here info about what happened: 0x80300002".
Is this the problem caused by my SSD which i'm going to install Windows on ?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Try creating new installation media. That error is generally due to bad installation files or bad installation media. It could be you need a different flash drive or that you just need to run the media creation tool again and create a new installer.
 
Feb 19, 2020
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Try creating new installation media. That error is generally due to bad installation files or bad installation media. It could be you need a different flash drive or that you just need to run the media creation tool again and create a new installer.
So i have managed to get a new flash drive and install Windows the same way as you instructed, but that also didn't work. I installed it on the same SSD that i had Windows on before, could it be that my SSD having problem and should i try my other drives to install Windows on ?
 
Feb 19, 2020
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Yes, I'd disconnect the SSD and try installing on a different drive if possible. At least to see if it's just the drive that's to blame.
i have disconnected the SSD and install Windows on my HDD but it said :"Windows cannot be installed to this disk.The selected disk has an MBR partition table. On EFI system, Windows can only be installed to GPT disk."
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
IDK what is going on, but it seems to me you are missing a step or a setting in the BIOS somewhere, because there shouldn't BE any existing partition, at all, on any drive, by the time you get to the point where Windows could give you that message. ALL existing partitions, ALL, should be deleted from the drive prior to reaching the point where Windows begins it's installation process and so by that point there should not be any partitions for it to tell you that it is the wrong type.

If you follow the guide I linked you to, step by exact step, you will see that the step to remove all existing partitions is in there and in hundreds of Windows installations I have never seen a message saying anything like what you are indicating before you could get to the point where you are able to delete ALL of the existing partitions on that drive (Which WILL permanently lose all the data on that drive so copy it elsewhere first if there is data on the drive that is important to you, before proceeding) and then click the "Next" button.


 
Feb 19, 2020
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IDK what is going on, but it seems to me you are missing a step or a setting in the BIOS somewhere, because there shouldn't BE any existing partition, at all, on any drive, by the time you get to the point where Windows could give you that message. ALL existing partitions, ALL, should be deleted from the drive prior to reaching the point where Windows begins it's installation process and so by that point there should not be any partitions for it to tell you that it is the wrong type.

If you follow the guide I linked you to, step by exact step, you will see that the step to remove all existing partitions is in there and in hundreds of Windows installations I have never seen a message saying anything like what you are indicating before you could get to the point where you are able to delete ALL of the existing partitions on that drive (Which WILL permanently lose all the data on that drive so copy it elsewhere first if there is data on the drive that is important to you, before proceeding) and then click the "Next" button.


i have successfully clean installed my Windows, it was true that my SSD is dead. Is there a way to repair it, if i can will there be an option to transfer Windows file from my current drive to my SSD ?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Ok, so here's the bad news.

The Kingston A400 is a low end piece of crap. Sorry, that's just the way it is. Kingston does not have a very good track record when it comes to either the legitimacy of their SSD products OR the quality and reliability.

For example:



Kingston drives just tend towards the cheap, low priced end of things. Two years seems awfully short, but the fact is even the best drive can die prematurely. I'm not sure there even needs to be a reason for it aside from just a manufacturing defect. Obviously, things like power failures, surges, short circuits and impacts can definitely contribute to the probability of an early failure.

My advice on trying to use it is, if the drive is bad, it's bad. Verify that it's bad if possible using a drive health utility like hard disk sentinel or even more basic software like Kingston SSD manager, Seatools for Windows or WD lifeguard tools. Run the short and the extended tests.

If there is any indication of a problem with reallocated sectors or other issues, toss the drive in the trash and move on with life. You do not want to make any effort to use a drive that has shown itself to have problems because anything you put on there stands a good chance of being lost when the drive completely fails, if it hasn't already.

The good news is, it SHOULD still be under warranty if you bought it two years ago and have proof of purchase like a reciept or purchase invoice somewhere, since it has a three year warranty.

https://www.kingston.com/us/ssd/a400-solid-state-drive
 
Feb 19, 2020
20
0
10
0
Ok, so here's the bad news.

The Kingston A400 is a low end piece of crap. Sorry, that's just the way it is. Kingston does not have a very good track record when it comes to either the legitimacy of their SSD products OR the quality and reliability.

For example:



Kingston drives just tend towards the cheap, low priced end of things. Two years seems awfully short, but the fact is even the best drive can die prematurely. I'm not sure there even needs to be a reason for it aside from just a manufacturing defect. Obviously, things like power failures, surges, short circuits and impacts can definitely contribute to the probability of an early failure.

My advice on trying to use it is, if the drive is bad, it's bad. Verify that it's bad if possible using a drive health utility like hard disk sentinel or even more basic software like Kingston SSD manager, Seatools for Windows or WD lifeguard tools. Run the short and the extended tests.

If there is any indication of a problem with reallocated sectors or other issues, toss the drive in the trash and move on with life. You do not want to make any effort to use a drive that has shown itself to have problems because anything you put on there stands a good chance of being lost when the drive completely fails, if it hasn't already.

The good news is, it SHOULD still be under warranty if you bought it two years ago and have proof of purchase like a reciept or purchase invoice somewhere, since it has a three year warranty.

https://www.kingston.com/us/ssd/a400-solid-state-drive
I have run the hard disk sentinel and showing that the SSD health is at 0%, so you suggest that i should get rid of it. Do you know any good SSD card to recommend ?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I would suggest that you RMA it for warranty replacement from the manufacturer, if you have the original purchase information. A receipt, or invoice, or any documentation showing you bought it from an authorized seller would be fine. Or if you registered it with Kingston when you purchased it, then they should have a record of it.

What is your budget for an SSD if you have to pay out of pocket for it and what size are you looking to get?
 

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