[SOLVED] Motherboards VRM for no OCing setup ?

Nov 13, 2020
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So i want so start building my first PC next year, im currently gathering the parts one by one. Im planning to build my system in b450 motherboard, if im not going to overclock my CPU should i choose the MSI B450 A-Pro MAX or MSI B450m Pro-VDH will be enough??. I know that the A-Pro MAX has slightly better VRM than Pro-VDH, i just wanna know if better VRM also give you a better longevity for no overclocking intention? The CPU im going to pair it with is Ryzen 5 3600.
 
thanks for the reply, and yeah this actually also determine which case im gonna choose. So for the conclusion,
The higher motherboard vrm is = The higher overclocking performance you will get. but has no or minimal effect for no overclocking at all?? something like this right?
Somewhat true...but I'd change it to read "....The higher motherboard vrm is = The higher overclocking performance you can get...". A better VRM means it should run cooler and deliver a more stable voltage so you can get a higher overclock as a result. But there's more at play than just the VRM so what you can get isn't assured.

Also, that seems to imply a higher grade VRM is needed ONLY for overclocking. I wouldn't want to put a 16 core 3950X on one of these boards and then use it as it's intended to be used. That's processing long duration (like several hours long) AVX heavy workloads on all 16 cores/32 threads. Even when not overclocked it would doubtless work well enough but the VRM will also run extremely hot. That could lead to early FET failures with possible disaster for CPU and PSU in addition to motherboard.

If you HAD to do that I'd be sure to put a fan on the VRM area and monitor temperatures. And still don't do it very often.
 
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For a 3600 either will be fine, and actually even a 3700X/3800X would be fine with no overclocking.

A couple things: be aware that the B450 A-Pro MAX is an ATX board and won't fit an mATX case if that's why you're looking at the Pro-VDH.

Also, the MAX board will guaranteed work out of the box with a 3000 series processor but the other one may not if the BIOS hasn't been updated to make it 'Ryzen 3000 Ready'. This long after it's launch it should have been, but there's always 'new-old stock' hanging around you could be getting hold of. It's also questionable whether MSI would want to release updated non-MAX boards since the reason they made the MAX boards was for better Ryzen 3000 support without using an ugly BIOS interface and locking out many older CPU/APU's.
 
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Nov 13, 2020
11
0
10
0
For a 3600 either will be fine, and actually even a 3700X/3800X would be fine with no overclocking.

A couple things: be aware that the B450 A-Pro MAX is an ATX board and won't fit an mATX case if that's why you're looking at the Pro-VDH.

Also, the MAX board will guaranteed work out of the box with a 3000 series processor but the other one may not if the BIOS hasn't been updated to make it 'Ryzen 3000 Ready'. This long after it's launch it should have been, but there's always 'new-old stock' hanging around you could be getting hold of. It's also questionable whether MSI would want to release updated non-MAX boards since the reason they made the MAX boards was for better Ryzen 3000 support without using an ugly BIOS interface and locking out many older CPU/APU's.
thanks for the reply, and yeah this actually also determine which case im gonna choose. So for the conclusion,
The higher motherboard vrm is = The higher overclocking performance you will get. but has no or minimal effect for no overclocking at all?? something like this right?
 
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thanks for the reply, and yeah this actually also determine which case im gonna choose. So for the conclusion,
The higher motherboard vrm is = The higher overclocking performance you will get. but has no or minimal effect for no overclocking at all?? something like this right?
Somewhat true...but I'd change it to read "....The higher motherboard vrm is = The higher overclocking performance you can get...". A better VRM means it should run cooler and deliver a more stable voltage so you can get a higher overclock as a result. But there's more at play than just the VRM so what you can get isn't assured.

Also, that seems to imply a higher grade VRM is needed ONLY for overclocking. I wouldn't want to put a 16 core 3950X on one of these boards and then use it as it's intended to be used. That's processing long duration (like several hours long) AVX heavy workloads on all 16 cores/32 threads. Even when not overclocked it would doubtless work well enough but the VRM will also run extremely hot. That could lead to early FET failures with possible disaster for CPU and PSU in addition to motherboard.

If you HAD to do that I'd be sure to put a fan on the VRM area and monitor temperatures. And still don't do it very often.
 
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