Mouse and keyboard not working at W7 login screen

sanders3

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Oct 11, 2012
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Hey, I've searched for hours looking for solutions to my problems, here they are.

Whenever I start my computer and it gets to the Windows 7 login screen, my mouse and keyboard won't respond.

They work in BIOS but once Windows 7 starts to boot up...nothing!

My PC doesn't have any PS/2 ports on it, only USB so I can't even access my Desktop to see if the driver are enabled or if the Power Management options are right.

I can't do a "Last Known System Configuration" because F8 won't work.

My information:

Alienware X-51
Windows 7 Home
Intel Core 3.40
6GB RAM
NVidia Graphics Geforce GT545
Logitech Keyboard
Alienware Mouse

I can provide any other info that is needed

 

sanders3

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I have tried another Mouse and Keyboard-they won't work
I only have Windows 7

I'll try unplugging and plugging it back in and post back here in a bit
When I looked through BIOS, I didn't see a "Legacy USB Support" option, can you show me how to find it? Is it possible that it has another name on my system?

There is a "USB Controller" option and that's enabled by default.


 

sanders3

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So I tried what Jtt suggested(Unplugging and plugging back in the keyboard)but it didn't work.

I still don't know how to get to the "Legacy USB Support" Option in BIOS
 

sanders3

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I accidentally forgot to click reply, my bad!

I tried unplugging and plugging the Keyboard back in(Mouse Also)and that didn't work.

Could you explain how to get to that option in BIOS because I didn't see it.

I did however, see an option that said "USB Controller" which is enabled by default.
 

sanders3

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The closest thing I have to that is "Advanced BIOS Features" and in there my only options are:

Bootup Num-Lock [On]
OptionRom Display Screen [Display]

My tabs are:

Main
Advanced
-Standard CMOS Features
-Advanced BIOS Features
-CPU Configuration
-Integrated Devices
-Power Management Setup
Security
Boot
-Hard Disk Drive BBS Priorities
Exit

If that helps
 

sanders3

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Under Advanced BIOS Features the only two options I have are:

Bootup Num-Lock [On]
OptionRom Display Screen [Display]

Under Integrated Devices my options are:

USB Controller [Enabled]
HD Audio [Enabled]
Onboard LAN Controller [Disabled]
Primary Display [Discrete]

PCH SATA Configuration
SATA Mode [AHCI Mode]

(It won't allow me to change the SATA Mode because it's grayed out)

Which one is it?
 

sanders3

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Is there a way I can do that without losing all my files?

'Cause I have really important stuff on there. (pictures and movies of family outings, notes to self, game save files,etc) :(
 

Onus

Titan
Moderator
You could replace your original hard drive, use the repair disk to restore to a new drive, then install your old drive as a secondary drive in order to get the data off of it. If the new drive does not come with one, you will also need to get a SATA cable to reconnect it.
 

profkefah

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THATS RIGHT
 

sanders3

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Is there...a guide or walkthrough or something for that?

I don't even know where I could get another Hard Drive or what a SATA Cable is or is for.

How could I get the data off it without being able to access it?



I don't know nothing 'bout fixin' no computers.
 

Onus

Titan
Moderator
There are videos on YouTube of people installing or replacing hard drives. Many of them show an IDE (PATA) drive being replaced; the only differences are the cables, and there are no jumpers to set on SATA drives. An IDE drive uses a 4-pin Molex power connection and a 40 (or 80) pin ribbon cable (there are thick round ones available too, but the wide ends are the same); a SATA drive usually uses 15-pin flat connector (there may be only 4-5 wires going into it) for power, and a thin 7-pin data cable. You would remove your original drive and install the new one, then restore your system to the new drive. Assuming it is now working, you then re-install the original drive as an ADDITIONAL drive, not replacing the new one. It will appear as another drive letter (usually D: or E:, depending on if there is an optical drive in your system). Your system should have a spare power connector in it, but if the new drive does not come with a data cable, you may need to buy one. SATA cables are usually pretty cheap (<$5). If the drive is IDE, let us know as there are a few additional details like jumper settings on the drives.
 

sanders3

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OK. :eek:

I'd prefer to expend all other options before I perform rocket surgery.

I hope you'll understand. :D

 

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