Question Move Windows 10 to a different partition same SSD

AlexS

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Jun 16, 2011
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Hi

I want to reorganise the partition on my new laptop after I replace the SSD with a larger one. At present Windows is taking up the whole hard drive in one partition (50 GB or so), although there is a UEFI partition though at the beginning. That's it.

I'm gonna organise it thus.

UEFI (restored from backup)
Hackintosh (to be installed).
Linux (to be installed).
Linux Swap (to be created).
Windows (restored from backup).

Now I've backed up everything using Acronis True image 2020 and I'm going to restore the UEFI partition to the new hard drive (same position). However Windows will be restored to the 5th partition which probably means it won't boot anymore.

Can you point me on how to recover the GPT way? Note I am not (nor will I be) using MBR.

Thx.
 

popatim

Titan
Moderator
Image the drive with Macrium Reflect (its free) and when you restore it you can resize the partition. Leave the rest empty and then you can create new partitions when you install the other stuff.
[uefi] [win10] [large unpartitioned space]
 

AlexS

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Image the drive with Macrium Reflect (its free) and when you restore it you can resize the partition. Leave the rest empty and then you can create new partitions when you install the other stuff.
[uefi] [win10] [large unpartitioned space]
With respect please read my original post for the specifics of what I am doing and what I need to do. I'm using True image 2020, moving the Windows partition to an entirely different partition on the same SSD, and need to know how to restore the bootloader afterwards (GPT/UEFI) which is likely to be broken after I do so.

Thx.
 

popatim

Titan
Moderator
With respect please read my original post for the specifics of what I am doing and what I need to do. I'm using True image 2020, moving the Windows partition to an entirely different partition on the same SSD, and need to know how to restore the bootloader afterwards (GPT/UEFI) which is likely to be broken after I do so.

Thx.
With Respect, you're making it way harder then it needs to be. SSD's do not suffer performance issues with data being at the end of the drive like an HDD does. It makes no difference where data is in an SSD. The only thing you need to do is not use ALL the space, you need to leave 10-20% unallocated so the drive has room to do it's internal 'housekeeping' functions.

My way, 20 minutes tops and the outcome is the same.
You're way, hours turn into days.
How much time have you already spent fruitlessly researching this?

I looked at Acronis, haven't used it in a decade myself, and it is capable or resizing partitions during the restore process as well and save making another backup/image.

So after you get windows working, is the plan to use Grub as the final bootloader?
 

AlexS

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With Respect, you're making it way harder then it needs to be. SSD's do not suffer performance issues with data being at the end of the drive like an HDD does. It makes no difference where data is in an SSD. The only thing you need to do is not use ALL the space, you need to leave 10-20% unallocated so the drive has room to do it's internal 'housekeeping' functions.

My way, 20 minutes tops and the outcome is the same.
You're way, hours turn into days.
How much time have you already spent fruitlessly researching this?

I looked at Acronis, haven't used it in a decade myself, and it is capable or resizing partitions during the restore process as well and save making another backup/image.

So after you get windows working, is the plan to use Grub as the final bootloader?
Wrong, the hackintosh partition needs to be on the next partition after UEFI in order to work with the Clover bootloader in the UEFI partition, hence I must move the Windows partition. I have no choice.

I didn't want to debate this, I've already done my research, I know what I want, if you don't know the answer to my specific question then please don't hijack my thread with an irrelevant discussion. You're not helping me when I know exactly what I need to do here, I just need to find out how I can repair Windows after moving a partition governed by UEFI.

For the third time I'm using True image 2020, moving the Windows partition to an entirely different partition on the same SSD, and need to know how to restore the bootloader afterwards (GPT/UEFI) which is likely to be broken after I do so.

I repeat again, I simply what to know how I can get Windows to boot again after moving the partition via GPT/UEFI on the same drive. That's all. Anything else is off topic, please don't debate with me on why I need to do anything it's a waste of your time and mine.

Back to being Mr Nice Guy again. If anybody could give me a specific answer to my specific question I would really appreciate it.
 
Last edited:

USAFRet

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NOTE: I've never done this, but possibly this might work:
Minitool Parition Wizard to 'move' the partitions as desired.
https://www.partitionwizard.com/free-partition-manager.html

EasyBCD to manipulate the boot loader to talk to whatever partition the Windows OS ends up in.
 

lolnole

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EasyBCD could work with their bootable USB.

You can also do this manually via the command prompt. You will need to repair the boot record and rebuild the BCD store.

You will open up the command prompt via Windows Repair Your Computer. If you do not know how to do this, then please answer the following questions. Do you have access to Windows installation media? What version of Windows are you using?
 

AlexS

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Thx for your reply.

I've tried EasyBCD before, it was great with MBR but with UEFI I haven't had favourable results.


I'm happy with moving the partitions with True Image, it's just getting Windows to boot afterwards.

 
Last edited:

lolnole

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Here are the instructions on how to do it via command prompt. Create a UEFI partition (~128 MB FAT32) beforehand.

Assign a drive letter to EFI partition

1. Run the commands:

diskpart
sel disk 0
list vol


If you have multiple disks, you can use the command list disk to find the appropriate disk number.

sel vol [VOLUME_NUM]
assign letter=[DRIVE_LETTER]:


VOLUME_NUM refers to the EFI partition's volume number listed in list vol.
DRIVE_LETTER refers to any letter you choose not already assigned.

For example:
sel vol 4
assign letter=V:


2. Run the command:

bcdboot C:\windows /s DRIVE_LETTER: /f UEFI

Replace C:\windows with the path to the Windows directory in the new partition.

For example:

bcdboot C:\windows /s V: /f UEFI
 
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