[SOLVED] Moving components to new case

gamersunite23

Honorable
Aug 12, 2015
27
1
10,535
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I recently acquired a new case for my pc and wanted to purchase an anti static mat for when I move the components from the old one to it. My question is what would y'all recommend? What type, brand etc. grounded of course but I cant seem to find one i'd be happy with on amazon or newegg. Any and all help would be appreciated. thanks in advance.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
I would recommend..............none.

In 30+ years of building and repairing systems, I've NEVER used an anti-static mat or strap, and have never had any issues whatsoever. It's completely overblown and is totally NOT necessary. In fact, I don't personally know of anybody who works on systems that uses them. I know there are a few around who do, but realistically, it's not essential. So long as you are sure to not work on it in your socks after walking across the carpet, or simply remember to ground yourself on something after walking across the room, like a metal lamp or anything really, you are not going to have a problem.

It's a waste of money and time. If you want ANY videos of any of the most popular, or least popular, builders or reviewers, you won't see any of them wearing a ground strap and most of them won't be working on any kind of anti-static mat. Get a cardboard box and cut it until it lays flat if you're particularly worried about it. Personally, I have always found any hard surface desk, counter top, table, etc. to work fine. Using cardboard will help to ensure you don't scratch or break anything from working on a hard surface though.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
I would recommend..............none.

In 30+ years of building and repairing systems, I've NEVER used an anti-static mat or strap, and have never had any issues whatsoever. It's completely overblown and is totally NOT necessary. In fact, I don't personally know of anybody who works on systems that uses them. I know there are a few around who do, but realistically, it's not essential. So long as you are sure to not work on it in your socks after walking across the carpet, or simply remember to ground yourself on something after walking across the room, like a metal lamp or anything really, you are not going to have a problem.

It's a waste of money and time. If you want ANY videos of any of the most popular, or least popular, builders or reviewers, you won't see any of them wearing a ground strap and most of them won't be working on any kind of anti-static mat. Get a cardboard box and cut it until it lays flat if you're particularly worried about it. Personally, I have always found any hard surface desk, counter top, table, etc. to work fine. Using cardboard will help to ensure you don't scratch or break anything from working on a hard surface though.
 
Jul 14, 2020
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I didn't take any precautions on my current build other than grounding myself before I touched each new component and it's running just fine so you really don't need one. Just only touch the motherboard in places where your finger oils won't get on the board itself, like your cooler or the rear io shroud/cover if your mobo has one and you should be fine there. Same thing with gpu, just don't touch the gold finger pcb.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
I don't take any special precautions as far as not touching any specific parts of the hardware, at all, aside from the obvious common sense guidance of not trying to pick up or handle parts of things that might be especially brittle, or weak, or liable to break off easily. Other than that, modern motherboards are somewhat protected by special coatings, as are the PCBs on graphics cards etc.

I've built hundreds of systems through the years, and repaired or upgraded hundreds more, literally, and I have only ever seen one system that actually expressed any problems due to static electricity and that was an already built, functional system, where the guy was walking across carpet and holding that static charge and then passing it to the system every time he plugged in or unplugged a USB device. Putting down one of those heavy plastic floor mats meant for office chairs solved that problem.

Other than that, simply discharging yourself on any metal object OTHER than the case (Unless no hardware is yet installed in it) or the hardware itself first is really all you need to do. Also, as I said, don't built your system in area where you are likely to walk across thick carpet wearing socks, or at least be sure to discharge yourself first if you do. Don't wear heavy sweaters made from material that is likely to generate a static charge from you moving around while wearing it. Simple common sense things like that.

If you REALLY feel like you need to get an anti-static mat, how much are you willing to pay for one, because most of the cheap ones won't really do much of anything anyhow.
 

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