Question MSI b450m Mortar Max - can I upgrade 3700x to 3950x?

Nov 30, 2019
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Hi guys

My rig is a 3700x with MSI B450m Mortar Max. I'm using some software for work with is maxing out all the cores so I'm considering switching in a 3950x.

I know that theoretically it will work but are there any problems that I should be aware of before I go for it? The board works fine, but it is a lower end board so I'm just wondering if there will be problems running it with a 3950x CPU. I'll not be overclocking. I just need more cores to cope with the multi-core software I'm using in the daytime.

Cheers, Andrew
 
I am not sure but I believe that board has the same VRM design as the Tomahawk Max. I’ve seen reviews of the B450 Tomahawk Max running a 3950x just as well as a good X570 board at stock settings. I think it really depends if the VRM’s are up to it and I’m not sure if it is the same as the Tomahawk Max
 
Hi guys

My rig is a 3700x with MSI B450m Mortar Max. I'm using some software for work with is maxing out all the cores so I'm considering switching in a 3950x.

I know that theoretically it will work but are there any problems that I should be aware of before I go for it? The board works fine, but it is a lower end board so I'm just wondering if there will be problems running it with a 3950x CPU. I'll not be overclocking. I just need more cores to cope with the multi-core software I'm using in the daytime.

Cheers, Andrew
For B450 boards the Mortar has a robust and well-cooled VRM that uses the same design as the Tomahawk's. it's about the only B450M board you can safely run a 3950X on, in fact. It will kick out a lot of heat though, and being mATX it's frequently found in smaller and less well ventilated cases which limits the airflow across the heatsink. Being massive isn't enough, you have to have airflow to keep it cool so plan for that too.

Oh yeah, and I wouldn't plan on overclocking it with anything other than PBO. I'd definitely give it a try with the upgrade before looking at any of the B550M's, especialy the B550m Mortar which has a massively robust VRM design that can easily handle a 3950X.
 
Nov 30, 2019
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For B450 boards the Mortar has a robust and well-cooled VRM that uses the same design as the Tomahawk's. it's about the only B450M board you can safely run a 3950X on, in fact. It will kick out a lot of heat though, and being mATX it's frequently found in smaller and less well ventilated cases which limits the airflow across the heatsink. Being massive isn't enough, you have to have airflow to keep it cool so plan for that too.

Oh yeah, and I wouldn't plan on overclocking it with anything other than PBO. I'd definitely give it a try with the upgrade before looking at any of the B550M's, especialy the B550m Mortar which has a massively robust VRM design that can easily handle a 3950X.
thanks drea.drechsler. If it has a similar spec VRM as the Tomahawk does that mean it can supply the same amount of volts to the CPU as the Tomahawk?

Regards, Andrew
 
thanks drea.drechsler. If it has a similar spec VRM as the Tomahawk does that mean it can supply the same amount of volts to the CPU as the Tomahawk?

Regards, Andrew
Any motherboard will deliver the voltage as a minimum, some more steady than others maybe. Where they fall short is delivering the required current the CPU needs while dissipating the waste heat that the FET's inevitably create. The Mortar and Tomahawk have the similar, if not identical, capabilities for that.
 
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Nov 30, 2019
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Any motherboard will deliver the voltage as a minimum, some more steady than others maybe. Where they fall short is delivering the required current the CPU needs while dissipating the waste heat that the FET's inevitably create. The Mortar and Tomahawk have the similar, if not identical, capabilities for that.
thanks drea.drechsler, it looks right on the edge of what this MB is capable of. I'd definitely upgrade my case to a front mesh style.

As this PC is for work I don't want to stretch the components to the point of them becoming unreliable. What the worst that could happen? Thermal throttling?

Regards, Andrew
 
The most likely is that VRM components (especially the capacitors) will degrade over time to the point it can't deliver steady voltage, leaving the CPU unstable. The worst is catastrophic failure with a part shorting out which would only be likely to happen if there's a defective component somewhere in the circuit.

What software do you plan on running and at what duty cycle? Most normal work loads, such as rendering out a video every day for 1 or 2 hours, would not be any sort of issue. You should expect the motherboard and CPU to provide reliable service at least for as long as they are technologically relevant (4-5 years). But if you plan on doing something that involves 24/7 processing of AVX heavy, all-core workloads you might consider robust cooling for both motherboard and processor to keep it reliable.

Also don't overclock conventionally. It doesn't result in significant performance gains and definitely generates massive more heat and stress on VRM, PSU and CPU. Even on a massively more powerful motherboard, overclocking will result in seriously shortened CPU life.
 
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The most likely is that VRM components (especially the capacitors) will degrade over time to the point it can't deliver steady voltage, leaving the CPU unstable. The worst is catastrophic failure with a part shorting out which would only be likely to happen if there's a defective component somewhere in the circuit.

What software do you plan on running and at what duty cycle? Most normal work loads, such as rendering out a video every day for 1 or 2 hours, would not be any sort of issue. You should expect the motherboard and CPU to provide reliable service at least for as long as they are technologically relevant (4-5 years). But if you plan on doing something that involves 24/7 processing of AVX heavy, all-core workloads you might consider robust cooling for both motherboard and processor to keep it reliable.

Also don't overclock conventionally. It doesn't result in significant performance gains and definitely generates massive more heat and stress on VRM, PSU and CPU. Even on a massively more powerful motherboard, overclocking will result in seriously shortened CPU life.
I use point cloud registering software. It will use as many cores as you have. I use it full-on 1 day a week. I guess the CPU maxes out for 15 mins every hour on that day.

I have no intention of overclocking and if I do upgrade I'd get a mesh style case. I think it a case of monitoring the VRM and CPU temps and see how it goes.

Many thanks for all your help, it's very much appreciated.

Kind regards, Andrew
 
I use point cloud registering software. It will use as many cores as you have. I use it full-on 1 day a week. I guess the CPU maxes out for 15 mins every hour on that day.
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One day (or even several) a week won't be overly stressful on the system. Especially so if only 15 minutes of every hour of that day does it fully load the processor even should that mean running optimized code heavy on AVX operations.

Being run in stock configuration, sitting in a good mesh case with fans set up for proper ventilation I'd have to think it will be just fine.
 
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