[SOLVED] Multiple Displays

Mar 20, 2020
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I am very confused and my brain is fried after my 5 hour exam this morning. I ended up buying an HDMI Switch, it has 3 female ports in one adapter, that has one going out to the HDMI on the GPU and two going to my two monitors. But, it definitely did not do what I thought it would. I can only switch between which monitor gets signal while the other gets nothing.

I am running a GTX 970, and hopefully three monitors soon. All 1080p. My main gaming monitor is using the DVI port on my GPU, so I only have a HDMI, VGA, and DisplayPort left. The two monitors I am trying to hook up are the HP 27 ES and HP 27 ER (one has a black back and one has a white back). The two HP's only have two HDMI ports on the back. I currently am running my gaming monitor through the DVI and one of the HP's through the HDMI port. I am trying to figure out how to get a third monitor running without a duplicated picture.

Should I:
  1. Buy a HDMI (male) to DisplayPort (male) cord
  2. Buy a HDMI (female) to DisplayPort (male) adapter
  3. Buy a DisplayPort splitter with the male going to the GPU and two female HDMI ends to run the two HP monitors off of. Would this allow the two monitors to run with separate pictures?
I know some of these adapters are directional, and before I buy one, I want to ask someone who has knowledge with doing this before I waste more time. This is the first time I will be running triple monitors.

What would be the easiest and best solution to fix this issue. I want to keep the cords to a minimum behind my computer.
 

k1114

Titan
Moderator
As you have experienced a switch...switches like an on/off switch, it's one or the other. I understand wanting less cables but it really just complicates things. You still end up with a separate cable to each monitor. Just tie them together and any slack in one bundle.

A splitter typically duplicates although dp is an exception as it can send multiple signals through 1 cable; it depends on the splitter and those cost a lot more than an adapter or cable. They should be labeled as a mst hub not simply a splitter but with cheaper chinese knockoffs, they typically will still say splitter.

I would suggest an adapter because if you get an hdmi cable, you can use it as hdmi to hdmi if you need to or with the adapter for dp to hdmi. If you have the dp to hdmi cable, then that is it's only use. You may also want to get an active adapter to avoid other possible issues. Cables tend to be passive.

The video signal goes out the gpu to the monitor so it's dp to hdmi. Do not get hdmi to dp. They are almost always directional unless they are the more expensive ones that specifically state it's bidirectional.
 
Reactions: ClemsonFanKyle

k1114

Titan
Moderator
As you have experienced a switch...switches like an on/off switch, it's one or the other. I understand wanting less cables but it really just complicates things. You still end up with a separate cable to each monitor. Just tie them together and any slack in one bundle.

A splitter typically duplicates although dp is an exception as it can send multiple signals through 1 cable; it depends on the splitter and those cost a lot more than an adapter or cable. They should be labeled as a mst hub not simply a splitter but with cheaper chinese knockoffs, they typically will still say splitter.

I would suggest an adapter because if you get an hdmi cable, you can use it as hdmi to hdmi if you need to or with the adapter for dp to hdmi. If you have the dp to hdmi cable, then that is it's only use. You may also want to get an active adapter to avoid other possible issues. Cables tend to be passive.

The video signal goes out the gpu to the monitor so it's dp to hdmi. Do not get hdmi to dp. They are almost always directional unless they are the more expensive ones that specifically state it's bidirectional.
 
Reactions: ClemsonFanKyle
Mar 20, 2020
3
0
10
0
As you have experienced a switch...switches like an on/off switch, it's one or the other. I understand wanting less cables but it really just complicates things. You still end up with a separate cable to each monitor. Just tie them together and any slack in one bundle.

A splitter typically duplicates although dp is an exception as it can send multiple signals through 1 cable; it depends on the splitter and those cost a lot more than an adapter or cable. They should be labeled as a mst hub not simply a splitter but with cheaper chinese knockoffs, they typically will still say splitter.

I would suggest an adapter because if you get an hdmi cable, you can use it as hdmi to hdmi if you need to or with the adapter for dp to hdmi. If you have the dp to hdmi cable, then that is it's only use. You may also want to get an active adapter to avoid other possible issues. Cables tend to be passive.

The video signal goes out the gpu to the monitor so it's dp to hdmi. Do not get hdmi to dp. They are almost always directional unless they are the more expensive ones that specifically state it's bidirectional.
Out of these two options, which one would you chose? I have a white pc case, but I have no idea which brand is more reliable. My guess would the the Insignia. Although the price difference is $10, they both only support 1080p.

https://www.bestbuy.com/site/insignia-displayport-to-hdmi-adapter-black/5812034.p?skuId=5812034

https://www.walmart.com/ip/onn-DisplayPort-to-HDMI-Adapter-Cable-White/133945844
 

k1114

Titan
Moderator
It simply changes the position of the wires to go from dp to hdmi. Passive adapters should be closer to $5. An active adapter will be converting the signal. That should be around $20. There are sometimes issues when the gpu needs an active adapter when running multiple monitors because it needs to be a dp output rather than dp running in hdmi mode. There have been instances with setups like yours where you are already using dvi and hdmi so it won't output another hdmi signal.
 

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