Question Must memory not on a QVL be avoided?

Pimpom

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I've been tasked with building a budget desktop for someone (not myself) for architectural CAD work with occasional 3D rendering. Due to budget constraints, the system will initially operate without a graphics card. I have my eye on a Ryzen 7 5700G, an Asus Prime B450M-A II motherboard and 2x16GB of 3200 MHz DDR4.

The cheapest RAM that meets my specification is Corsair Vengeance LPX (16-20-20-38) which is currently available in my country for the equivalent of US$63 for each 16GB stick (CMK16GX4M1E3200C16). However, it's not on Asus' QVL for the Prime B450M-A II. In fact, the vast majority of RAM models on that one-year-old list are paired kits.

Does this mean that this RAM model should be avoided?

Request: I'm sure many experienced members will have alternative suggestions for the components I mentioned - CPU/APU, mobo and RAM and such suggestions will be welcome later. But please stick to the question for the time being.
 

punkncat

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In my own experience with Ryzen in general, I would attempt to search out either G Skill or A-Data (XPG/Hynix).

The QVL is the 'nod' that the mobo manufacturer has tested that specific set with the mobo. As time goes on they don't typically test more and often the models listed will be surpassed and replaced with something faster. So, it not being there isn't always an indication it won't work, but rather that it just hasn't been tested.

There seem to be a LOT of threads concerning Ryzen builds with Corsair RAM having issue. That isn't a reflection on Corsair, as it is a quality type just seems to turn up way more often in relation to having issue. It may well be due to good pricing and popularity more than anything else.

If you are going to use a "G" skew Ryzen, get the absolute fastest RAM you can as it helps the APU a lot.

edit of note- Make SURE that you triple check the mobo and CPU compatibility such that you know you won't need (for instance) a 3xxx series Ryzen CPU to update BIOS for the 5xxx compatibility. Some motherboards allow for BIOS changes to be made simply though powering (only) the mobo. I did not look to see that your selection offers said feature. The quagmire that AMD has created in relation to BIOS compatibility is a bit of a bother.

With all that said, check with the software that will be used and see if they specify a preference for AMD/Intel.
 

kanewolf

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I've been tasked with building a budget desktop for someone (not myself) for architectural CAD work with occasional 3D rendering. Due to budget constraints, the system will initially operate without a graphics card. I have my eye on a Ryzen 7 5700G, an Asus Prime B450M-A II motherboard and 2x16GB of 3200 MHz DDR4.

The cheapest RAM that meets my specification is Corsair Vengeance LPX (16-20-20-38) which is currently available in my country for the equivalent of US$63 for each 16GB stick (CMK16GX4M1E3200C16). However, it's not on Asus' QVL for the Prime B450M-A II. In fact, the vast majority of RAM models on that one-year-old list are paired kits.

Does this mean that this RAM model should be avoided?

Request: I'm sure many experienced members will have alternative suggestions for the components I mentioned - CPU/APU, mobo and RAM and such suggestions will be welcome later. But please stick to the question for the time being.
RAM not on the QVL runs the risk of having a compatibility issue. It has not been verified by the motherboard manufacturer. How much are you willing to gamble? Only you can answer that.
The risk is low, but not zero. QVL has zero risk, because the motherboard manufacturer took the risk and did the testing.
As @USAFRet said, you should buy RAM in matched sets. Why? Again it is a risk reduction. The RAM manufacturer has tested the sticks in a set together and guarantees they work together. Without that, you are doing that testing and taking the risk that two random sticks will work or not.
 

Pimpom

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OK. I guess I'll go back to searching for a compatible kit. Thanks for all the replies.

Now, this is not an argument or a retort: I've assembled some 200 desktops since the early 2000s except for the past 5 years or so. Some of those were with unlisted, unmatched pairs of memory. Never had an issue. I suppose things get more critical as technology advances. Just musing.
 

kanewolf

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OK. I guess I'll go back to searching for a compatible kit. Thanks for all the replies.

Now, this is not an argument or a retort: I've assembled some 200 desktops since the early 2000s except for the past 5 years or so. Some of those were with unlisted, unmatched pairs of memory. Never had an issue. I suppose things get more critical as technology advances. Just musing.
It is a question of risk. Is a failure (won't boot, or has memory errors) an acceptable risk? If so, go for it.
 
I've been tasked with building a budget desktop for someone (not myself) for architectural CAD work with occasional 3D rendering. Due to budget constraints, the system will initially operate without a graphics card. I have my eye on a Ryzen 7 5700G, an Asus Prime B450M-A II motherboard and 2x16GB of 3200 MHz DDR4.

The cheapest RAM that meets my specification is Corsair Vengeance LPX (16-20-20-38) which is currently available in my country for the equivalent of US$63 for each 16GB stick (CMK16GX4M1E3200C16). However, it's not on Asus' QVL for the Prime B450M-A II. In fact, the vast majority of RAM models on that one-year-old list are paired kits.

Does this mean that this RAM model should be avoided?

Request: I'm sure many experienced members will have alternative suggestions for the components I mentioned - CPU/APU, mobo and RAM and such suggestions will be welcome later. But please stick to the question for the time being.
See if something here fits.
https://www.crucial.com/compatible-upgrade-for/asus/prime-b450m-a-ii?speed(-)DDR4-3200(--)kit-qty(-)2

Filter by 3200 speed and kit of 2.
 

punkncat

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OK. I guess I'll go back to searching for a compatible kit. Thanks for all the replies.

Now, this is not an argument or a retort: I've assembled some 200 desktops since the early 2000s except for the past 5 years or so. Some of those were with unlisted, unmatched pairs of memory. Never had an issue. I suppose things get more critical as technology advances. Just musing.

I would be willing to bet that all of those system with unmatched RAM were Intel.
 

Math Geek

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ddr3 days and before, ram was much more adaptable. i mismatched sticks all the time with rarely any issue.

however, with ddr4 this seems to not be true anymore. i feel you for sure, but at these faster speeds, the matched sets are the way to go. it may or may not work otherwise but you get a much bigger chance of success with the matched sets. multiple single sticks can mean hours of headaches then you end up returning the ram anyway.
 

Lafong

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What is the ratio (worldwide) of pre-builts (larger OEMs) to self-built?

I have no idea, but I'd guess it is strongly in favor of pre-builts (90 plus percent?).....and I'd suppose virtually all of those were assembled with known compatible RAM, due to considerable testing by the OEM.

Now I'm wondering about self-builts only.

What percentage of the self-builts within a 10 mile radius of your home were built with RAM known to be on the QVL list by the builder?

Under half?
 

Math Geek

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since i built many of the custom systems near my house i can say that it is less than 10% around me :)

not saying the qvl list is a bad thing, just saying i don't usually pay attention to it nor have i had any major problems.

think maybe 2 times i have had a ram compatibility issue. and yes they were ryzen systems which does seem to be a lot more picky than current intel ones.
 

Pimpom

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I would be willing to bet that all of those system with unmatched RAM were Intel.
Nope. 90% were AMD. I didn't open a shop selling computers or anything like that. I'm in electronics, always worked at home, and people asked me to decide on the best configuration for their budget and usage. Those people included hospitals, individuals, government departments, educational institutions and such.

I'm in a state capital but the state is one of the most isolated in the country. I had a regular supplier in the nearest major city then. Once I'd decided on the components (I always took that part of the job very seriously), I call my suppliers and they ship the same or next day by air cargo. No internet banking in the early part of those days, so I sent a bank draft when I receive the shipment.
 

geofelt

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I did search for a 2x16GB kit earlier but couldn't find any at a price that's reasonably close to that of the Corsair single.
Corsair and other makers will have an app to select compatible ram.
You enter the make/model of your motherboard(and cpu in the case of ryzen) and you will get a list of supported kits.
Pick the exact part number supported.
Such ram will have a lifetime warranty in case it does not seem to work.
Corsair ram customer support is good if you run into problems.
Here is a link to the Corsair app:
 

Pimpom

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Corsair and other makers will have an app to select compatible ram.
You enter the make/model of your motherboard(and cpu in the case of ryzen) and you will get a list of supported kits.
Pick the exact part number supported.
Such ram will have a lifetime warranty in case it does not seem to work.
Corsair ram customer support is good if you run into problems.
Here is a link to the Corsair app:
There's no Prime B450M-A II there. The Prime B450M-A (not II) page you linked to does not have Ryzen 7 5700G in the drop-down CPU list.

I have found some other promising candidates but so far none that's available in my country.
 

Pimpom

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The biggest problem with QVL lists is that they are rarely updated. The motherboard manufacturer moves on to the next generation products and the QVL list becomes a dead document.
Too true. The problem with trying out a RAM model not included in the QVL - as suggested by some - is that most online shops here accept returns only for defective products.
 

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